89.1 WEMU

Getting to know the oddly informative Adam Felber, panelist of NPR's Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!, which will be featured as a part of this year's Ann Arbor Summer Festival.

89.1, WEMU, and Music Director Linda Yohn, pick up awards at JazzWeek summit in Rochester NY.

89.1, WEMU was named Station of the Year and Music Director, Linda Yohn, was named Music Director of the Year, in the small market category, at the 2003 JazzWeek Jazz Summit in Rochester NY, June 5-7.

Dexter – By a nearly four-to-one margin, voters in the Dexter School District approved a Headlee rollback. The final tally was 956-to-276. In the school board race, Incumbant Dick Lundy was re-elected to a four-year term. He'll be joined on the board by newcomer Julie Schumaker.

Chelsea – The Chelsea Board of Education will have a new member. Voters in the district Monday Elected Lorel McDevett to a four-year term. McDevett beat out incumbant Conrad Knutsen on a vote of 454-274.

Ypsilanti, Michigan – Incumbents Floyd Brumfield and Andy Fanta will keep their seats on the Ypsilanti Board of Education. The two incumbents easily defeated challengers Melodie Gable and Allen Thompson.
District voters also approved restoring the millage on non-homestead property that was exempted under the Headlee tax limitation amendment to the state's constitution. That will bring at least another 200-thousand dollars to the district in the coming school year.

Lincoln-Consolidated Schools – Just over seven-hundred voters turned out for the school election in the Lincoln-Consolidated School District. 351-of them voted in favor of the Headlee rollback. 262-voted against. Jeffrey Stokes and Kimberly Samuelson won election to the school board.

Ypsilanti, Michigan – Voters in the Saline school district have returned Art Trapp and David Phillips to the district's board of education. Both were unopposed in yesterday's election.
In the Willow Run school district, incumbent Scott Wilson was unopposed for another four-year term. Newcomer Avery Hanningberg was unopposed for the remainder of a one-year term on the school board.

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NPR News

On a recent sunny afternoon at a solar farm outside Philadelphia, Pa., commercial drone pilots Tony Zimlich and Gunner Goldie are preparing for flight.

Dressed in hard hats and matching yellow vests, they run through a series of safety and equipment checks, and survey the surrounding terrain and airspace, before picking up what looks like a pair of oversized video game controllers. Then, with a streak of beeps and whirs, their drone — about the size of a milk crate — rises steadily into the sky above.

"There was a girl in my class who had on dirty clothes. The other kids laughed at her but I played with her during recess."

That's an everyday act of kindness toward a child who is being ostracized. It was reported by an elementary school student who took part in a new, nationally-representative survey of children ages 9 to 11. The purpose was to capture not only the bad, but also the good of how children treat each other, and even a little bit of the why.

Here are some of the key findings:

People who are diagnosed with pre-diabetes can delay or prevent the disease if they change their lifestyle and lose a significant amount of weight. But here's the challenge: How can people be motivated to eat healthier and move more? Increasingly, the answer might include digital medicine.

"Just telling people to do things doesn't work," says Sean Duffy, CEO of Omada Health. If it were easy, there wouldn't be more than 80 million adults in the U.S. with pre-diabetes.

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