89.1 WEMU

Join WEMU At The TRUEMU Tigers Game, July 21st

For a gift of just $400 you and a friend can take the limo bus to Comerica Park, suite tickets, and buffet. Plus, you'll receive a free TRUEMU souveniour, get your photo taken in the outfield - and see a great game as the Detroit Tigers take on the the Boston Red Sox on July 21.

Read More

Candidate Forum: Soapbox Summer

No reporter questions, no interruptions or interference. Your candidates unfiltered.

June 25, 2003 – Andy Cluley can't believe his idol is coming to town...

Getting to know the oddly informative Adam Felber, panelist of NPR's Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!, which will be featured as a part of this year's Ann Arbor Summer Festival.

89.1, WEMU, and Music Director Linda Yohn, pick up awards at JazzWeek summit in Rochester NY.

89.1, WEMU was named Station of the Year and Music Director, Linda Yohn, was named Music Director of the Year, in the small market category, at the 2003 JazzWeek Jazz Summit in Rochester NY, June 5-7.

Dexter – By a nearly four-to-one margin, voters in the Dexter School District approved a Headlee rollback. The final tally was 956-to-276. In the school board race, Incumbant Dick Lundy was re-elected to a four-year term. He'll be joined on the board by newcomer Julie Schumaker.

Chelsea – The Chelsea Board of Education will have a new member. Voters in the district Monday Elected Lorel McDevett to a four-year term. McDevett beat out incumbant Conrad Knutsen on a vote of 454-274.

Ypsilanti, Michigan – Incumbents Floyd Brumfield and Andy Fanta will keep their seats on the Ypsilanti Board of Education. The two incumbents easily defeated challengers Melodie Gable and Allen Thompson.
District voters also approved restoring the millage on non-homestead property that was exempted under the Headlee tax limitation amendment to the state's constitution. That will bring at least another 200-thousand dollars to the district in the coming school year.

Pages

NPR News

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

To an outsider, the fancy booths at a June health insurance industry gathering in San Diego, Calif., aren't very compelling: a handful of companies pitching "lifestyle" data and salespeople touting jargony phrases like "social determinants of health."

But dig deeper and the implications of what they're selling might give many patients pause: A future in which everything you do — the things you buy, the food you eat, the time you spend watching TV — may help determine how much you pay for health insurance.

More From NPR

Stay in touch

Newsletter

Stay informed with our weekly WEMU E-Update

Support 89.1 WEMU

Non-commercial, fact based reporting is made possible by your financial support.  Make your donation to WEMU today to keep your community NPR station thriving.