The Two-Way
6:25 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Report: Fukushima Released More Radioactive Material Than Japan Estimated

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 7:18 am

An unpublished study by European scientists has found that the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant may have released much more radioactive active material than the Japanese government estimated.

NPR's Richard Harris filed this report for the Newscast unit:

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The Salt
6:03 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Crop Insurance: A Pricey 'Safety Net' For Farmers

Illinois farmers harvest corn crops near Monticello, Ill. An unseasonably hot summer likely damaged much of this year's corn crop, which means farmers may seek support through their crop insurance.

Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 2:36 pm

Farming nowadays is risky business — it's not uncommon for a farmer to invest $500,000 in 1,000 acres of corn or soybeans, and run the risk of losing a chunk of their income to pests or fickle weather events like droughts and floods.

That's why farmers say crop insurance is "the most important safety net program" for them, says Joe Glauber, chief economist of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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The Two-Way
5:55 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Saudi King Names 78-Year-Old Nayef Bin Abdulaziz As His Successor

Prince Nayef bin Abdul Aziz al-Saud waving before delivering a speech at the Shura (consultative) Council in Riyadh in 2007.

Hassa Ammar AFP/Getty Images

As expected, King Abdullah of Egypt has appointed his half-brother, 78-year-old Nayef bin Abdulaziz, crown prince. The news comes, after the heir to the throne, Crown Prince Sultan bin Abdel Aziz Al Saud died on Saturday.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:03 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Hormones And Metabolism Conspire Against Dieters

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 8:24 pm

There are some fresh insights from Australia that help explain why it's so difficult for dieters to keep off the weight they lose.

Willpower will only take you so far, in case you haven't run that experiment yourself. Turns out our bodies have a fuel gauge, not entirely unlike the gas gauge on our cars, that tell us when it's time to tank up on food.

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The Two-Way
4:56 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Markets Rally After Europe Cements Debt Deal

Originally published on Thu October 27, 2011 4:57 pm

With European debt deal worked out, world markets rallied. The U.S. markets' rally managed to get them into positive territory for the year.

Here's how The New York Times frames the story:

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The Two-Way
4:27 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Nintendo Predicts Its First Annual Loss In 30 Years

Originally published on Thu October 27, 2011 4:28 pm

Based on a strong Yen and lower-than-expected sales of its 3DS system, Nintendo predicted it would post a yearly loss for the first time in its 30-year history.

Bloomberg reports:

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Music Interviews
4:25 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Chris Isaak Pays Tribute To Sun Studio's Golden Years

For Beyond the Sun, Chris Isaak picked classic songs that he'd been singing his whole life.

Courtesy of the artist

What if you could time-travel back to Memphis' Sun Studios in the 1950s? Behind the console would be none other than producer Sam Phillips. You might hear such classic songs as "My Happiness," "Crazy Arms" or "Walk the Line," originally recorded at Sun Studio by Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and Johnny Cash, respectively.

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Politics
4:16 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Muslim Activist Challenges Fla. Republican's Views

There's no member of the Republican freshman class in Congress more outspoken than Florida Rep. Allen West.

Since he was elected last year, West has become a strong voice on Capitol Hill for fiscal restraint, socially conservative values — and responding to the threat posed by Islamic extremists.

On the topic of Islam, West has been particularly controversial. He calls it not a religion but a "theocratic political ideology" that's a threat to America.

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Opinion
4:01 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Intelligent Design: McCarthy, Myself And AI

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel shakes hands with "SpaceJustin," a humanoid space robot, at last year's International Aerospace Exhibition (ILA) at the Schoenefeld airport in Berlin.

Johannes Eisele AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 8:24 pm

Adam Frank is an astrophysicist at the University of Rochester. He is a regular contributor to the NPR blog 13.7: Cosmos and Culture.

What is going to happen when our machines wake up? What will happen when all these computers that run our lives suddenly become intelligent and self-aware? It's a question that makes sense to ask today, as the world marks the recent passage of John McCarthy.

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Living Large: Obesity In America
3:50 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Workplaces Feel The Impact of Obesity

This office chair was custom-built by a company called ErgoGenesis for a client who exceeded the 600-pound limit of its other chairs. It cost $1,800.

Courtesy of ErgoGenesis

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 7:03 pm

Part of an ongoing series on obesity in America

From cubicle farms to auto factories, accommodating larger and heavier employees has become a fact of life. One in three U.S. adults is obese, and researchers say the impact on business can be boiled down to a number: $1,000 to $6,000 in added cost per year for each obese employee, the figure rising along with a worker's body mass index.

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