Politics
4:00 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Refinancing A Focus Of Obama's Economic Plan

Speaking in Las Vegas on Monday, President Obama announced a plan for homeowners to refinance mortgages at low interest rates, if they met certain conditions.

Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 12:59 pm

President Obama's home refinancing plan seeks to let a million or more American homeowners save money on their mortgages, even if those loans are underwater. But the plan announced Monday is not a new idea: A pair of economists at Columbia University — Chris Mayer and Glenn Hubbard — have been proposing a similar measure for years.

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NPR Story
4:00 am
Tue October 25, 2011

In Britain, A New Push To Leave EU

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 9:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

And I'm Ari Shapiro.

The European Union created a huge single market and stability for a continent that was ravaged by terrible wars during the 20th century. Now, in the 21st century, the European debt crisis has some eurozone members pushing to get out of the club. This all came to a head in Britain yesterday, where Parliament voted on whether to hold a public referendum on leaving the union.

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NPR Story
4:00 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Last Word In Business

Ari Shapiro has today's Last Word in business.

The Two-Way
6:26 pm
Mon October 24, 2011

Interim Leader Says Sharia Law Will Guide Libya

In a press conference, yesterday, Libya's transitional leader Mustafa Abdul-Jalil said that Sharia law will become the "main source" of legislation in a post-Gadhafi era.

The AP reports on the news:

Islamic law, or Sharia, is enshrined as the basis of the constitution in a number of Middle Eastern countries with Muslim majorities. Most Gulf nations' constitutions state that Sharia is a main source of legislation, while Egypt says it is "the source.

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Business
5:34 pm
Mon October 24, 2011

Netflix Loses 800,000 Customers In Third Quarter

Netflix said it expects its DVD subscribers to fall from 13.9 million as of Sept. 30 to as low as 10.3 million at the end of December.

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Netflix's video subscription service lost 800,000 customers in the third quarter the biggest exodus in its history even as its earnings rose 65 percent.

The losses were larger than management had previously warned. The unwelcome surprise, contained in financial results released Monday, was compounded by a forecast calling for millions of Netflix Inc.'s DVD-by-mail subscribers to cancel the service in reaction to dramatic price increase that took effect last month.

The bad news bruised already battered stock as the shares plunged by more than 26 percent.

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Africa
5:18 pm
Mon October 24, 2011

Activists Support U.S. Move Against Uganda Rebels

Joseph Kony, leader of the Lord's Resistance Army, in a 2006 photo. The Obama administration has sent 100 troops to advise militaries in Uganda and neighboring countries that are battling Kony's forces.

STR AP

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 6:50 am

Human rights groups don't usually cheer military forays. But they have offered loud applause for the Obama administration's decision to send 100 military advisers to several countries in Africa to help those nations fight one of the continent's most notorious rebel groups, the Lord's Resistance Army.

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The Two-Way
4:59 pm
Mon October 24, 2011

Guinness Balks At Handing 100-Year-Old Marathoner His Record

Fauja Singh, 100, celebrates at the finish line after completing the Toronto Waterfront Marathon in Toronto on Sunday, Oct. 16, 2011.

Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon AP

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 1:33 pm

Fauja Singh, the 100-year-old man who completed the Toronto Marathon, is being denied his place in the Guinness World Records. Guinness says he has not been able to produce a birth certificate, which it requires to certify a record.

But Singh has a passport and a letter from the Queen of England herself congratulating him on his 100th birthday.

Here's the BBC, which broke the story, today:

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The Two-Way
4:28 pm
Mon October 24, 2011

Views On The Iraq Withdrawal: From About Time To 'Absolute Disaster'

A U.S. solider on patrol in the restive northern oil-rich city of Kirkuk, on July 27, 2011.

Ali Al-Saadi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 24, 2011 4:34 pm

President Obama's announcement that all U.S. troops will withdraw from Iraq by the end of the year has prompted significant debate over the prudence of the policy. From the the politics of the decision, to possible threats of sectarian violence and the influence of Iran, opinion is sharply divided. Ted Koppel, Ret. Gen. Jack Keane, Bob Woodward, Brian Katulis and Peter Van Buren joined NPR's Neal Conan on Talk of the Nation today and weighed in.

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Karen Grigsby Bates is the Los Angeles-based correspondent for NPR News. Bates contributed commentaries to All Things Considered for about 10 years before she joined NPR in 2002 as the first correspondent and alternate host for The Tavis Smiley Show. In addition to general reporting and substitute hosting, she increased the show's coverage of international issues and its cultural coverage, especially in the field of literature and the arts.

Around the Nation
3:51 pm
Mon October 24, 2011

Families Broken Up As Immigrants Flee Alabama

Migrant worker advocate Lourdes Villanueva shows off the most popular playhouse at the Redlands Christian Migrant Association preschool in Mulberry, Fla. Despite the early arrival of kids from Alabama, the school can't open yet because it doesn't have enough money.

Scott Finn for NPR

Some immigrant families say Alabama's tough new immigration law is forcing them to split up, at least temporarily.

Every fall, migrant workers follow the tomato harvest south from Alabama to the Redlands Christian Migrant Association campus in Mulberry, Fla. It's an oasis of shady oak trees amid acres and acres of tomato fields.

But this year, women and children are showing up several weeks ahead of their husbands, who have stayed behind in Alabama to finish the tomato harvest. Other families who aren't migrant workers are showing up for the first time.

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