The Two-Way
8:11 am
Tue October 25, 2011

VIDEO: 2-Week Old Girl Rescued From Rubble In Turkey

Though the death toll (more than 360) continues to climb and the chances of finding more survivors are dimming, there is this bit of good news about what's happening in eastern Turkey, where a 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck on Sunday:

A 2-week-old baby girl, Azra Karaduman, was rescued today from the rubble of an apartment building.

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The Two-Way
7:45 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Mundane Mixup Helps Rangers Take 3-2 Lead In World Series

A little too late: Pitcher Marc Rzepczynski of the St. Louis Cardinals is removed by manager Tony La Russa in the eighth inning during Game Five of the MLB World Series against the Texas Rangers. Earlier in the inning, Rzepczynski was mistakenly left in the game because of a miscommunication between LaRussa and his bullpen. And the pitcher gave up the game-winning hit.

Tom Pennington Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 6:01 pm

If anyone asks you why the Texas Rangers beat the St. Louis Cardinals 4-2 last night to take a 3-2 lead in the World Series, tell them it was a missed call.

But it wasn't, as NPR's Mike Pesca said on Morning Edition, a mistake made by an umpire.

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Opinion
7:18 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Occupy Wall Street's Most Unlikely Ally: The Pope

Pope Benedict XVI rides in his popemobile through Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany, last month. The Vatican has released a document on world economics, condemning "idolatry of the market."

Thomas Niedermueller Getty Images

Thomas J. Reese is a senior fellow at the Woodstock Theological Center at Georgetown University, and a former editor of America, the national Catholic weekly magazine.

The Vatican released a document on the world economy on Monday that will cause heartburn in the Tea Party, but will be cheered by the folks occupying Wall Street.

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Opinion
7:00 am
Tue October 25, 2011

My Accidental Masterpiece: The Phantom Tollbooth

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 7:32 pm

Norton Juster is the author of The Phantom Tollbooth.

"There was once a boy named Milo who didn't know what to do with himself — not just sometimes but always. When he was in school he longed to be out, and when he was out he longed to be in ... Nothing really interested him — least of all the things that should have."

It was, of course, the doldrums — his own special version of them.

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Gadhafi Buried, Location Kept Secret

Former Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

Abdel Magid Al Fergany AP

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 9:17 am

The bodies of former Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi and his son Muatassim were buried this morning in a secret location, according to officials of the local military council in Misrata, Libya.

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Strange News
6:42 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Savory Cotton Candy Wins Caesar Salad Award

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 6:50 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with news of an unusual winning entry in Houston's annual Caesar salad competition. Best Presentation went to a Caesar salad cotton candy. As the Houston Press reports, the cotton candy was spun onto a cone made of romaine lettuce. Shredded parmesan cheese and black pepper were woven into the candy's pink fibers. It's not the most surprising entry. Last year's event included Caesar salad cupcakes and Caesar sorbet. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Strange News
6:35 am
Tue October 25, 2011

How To Get Rid Of Invasive Snakehead? Eat It

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: Good morning. I'm Ari Shapiro.

Here's one way to get rid of an invasive species - eat it. The snakehead fish arrived in Washington almost a decade ago. It's a scary looking marine predator that can even slither over land. In Asia, snakeheads are a delicacy, so tonight in Maryland a group of celebrity chefs will prepare the fish to appeal to American palates. One chef deep fries snakehead nuggets for a dish he calls frankenfish tacos. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Author Interviews
5:14 am
Tue October 25, 2011

'El Narco': The Trade Driving Mexico's Drug War

Bloomsbury Press

Over the last five years, the Mexican drug war has claimed the lives of an estimated 40,000 civilians and drug traffickers. British journalist Ioan Grillo describes it as "a bloodbath that has shocked the world."

In his new book, El Narco, Grillo takes a close look at the Mexican drug trade, starting with the term el narco, which has come to represent the vast, often faceless criminal network of drug smugglers who cast a murderous shadow over the entire country.

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Former elementary and middle school teacher Claudio Sanchez is an Education Correspondent for NPR. He focuses on the "three p's" of education reform: politics, policy and pedagogy. Sanchez's reports air regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Sanchez joined NPR in 1989, after serving for a year as executive producer for the El Paso, Texas, based Latin American News Service, a daily national radio news service covering Latin America and the U.S.- Mexico border.

From 1984 to 1988, Sanchez was news and public affairs director at KXCR-FM in El Paso. During this time, he contributed reports and features to NPR's news programs.

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