Middle East
4:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Egypt's Military Clashes With Coptic Christians

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 12:22 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Violence in Cairo over the weekend reminds us that Egypt is mostly Muslim but not entirely so. Several million Egyptians are Coptic Christians. And it was members of that minority group who clashed with Egypt's military or the weekend. At least two dozen people are dead, hundreds wounded, the worst violence since Hosni Mubarak was driven from power in February.

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Race
4:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Young Hispanics To Continue Shaping U.S. Landscape

Renee Montagne talks to sociologist Ruben Rumbaut, co-author of a landmark longitudinal study of children of immigrants, about whether young Latinos are truly bicultural.

Economy
4:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Nobel Prize For Economics To Be Announced

Thomas Sargent of New York University and Christopher A. Sims of Princeton University have won the Nobel Prize in economics. They won for their research on macroeconomics.

Analysis
4:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

This Week In Politics

President Obama has been going around the country trying to rev up crowds demanding Congress pass his jobs bill. But besides Republicans, some Democrats also oppose Obama's plan.

Business
4:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

Art & Design
4:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Ancient Roman Sculpture Rejoined At Turkish Museum

Two halves of an ancient Greek statue have been reunited and are on display in a Turkish museum. The top half spent the last two decades in the Boston Fine Arts Museum. Turkish officials said it was illegally removed from an archaeological site in southwestern Turkey and they spent years trying to get it back.

Middle East
4:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Assassination Galvanizes Syria's Kurdish Minority

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 12:22 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

An eruption of anger inside Syria at the assassination of a leading Kurdish politician is reverberating along the Turkish-Syria border. More than 7,500 Syrians are already sheltering in camps in Turkey. Now that Turkey is about to announce new sanctions against Syria, it's worried about a fresh wave of migration if violence continues to escalate.

NPR's Peter Kenyon has this report from Turkey's Hatay Province near the Syrian border.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHILDREN PLAYING)

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David Schaper is a NPR National Desk reporter based in Chicago.

In this role, he covers news in Chicago and around the Midwest. Additionally he reports on a broad range of important social, cultural, political, and business issues in the region.

The range of Schaper's reporting has included profiles of service members killed in Iraq, and members of a reserve unit returning home to Wisconsin. He produced reports on the important political issues in key Midwest battleground states, education issues related to "No Child Left Behind," the bankruptcy of United Airlines as well as other aviation and transportation issues, and the devastation left by tornadoes, storms, blizzards, and floods in the Midwest.

2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.
12:01 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Interactive: How Latinos Are Reshaping Communities

NPR

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 1:21 pm

Over the past decade, the story of population growth in the United States was defined largely by the story of Latinos emerging as the nation's largest minority.

They surpassed African-Americans for that distinction, by accounting for 56 percent of America's growth from 2000 to 2010. They now number more than 50 million. Put another way, 1 in every 6 U.S. residents is Latino.

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Your Health
12:01 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Mental First Aid: How To Help In An Emotional Crisis

Nikki Perez wanted to learn how to help others in crisis after recovering from her own mental health disorder.

Kelley Weiss for NPR

When Nikki Perez was in her 20s, she had a job as a lab tech at a hospital in Sacramento, Calif. She said everything was going well until one day, when something changed.

"I worked in a very sterile environment, and so part of the procedure was to wash your hands," she said. "I found myself washing my hands more and more, to the point where they were raw, and sometimes they would bleed."

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