Planet Money
12:58 am
Wed September 28, 2011

The Dream Of Europe And The Bailout Of Greece

Peace symbol
Michael Probst AP

"We need Greece," Maurice Minot, a Frankfurt taxi driver, told me, swerving in excitement. "We need Spain, we need Italy. It's the dream for Europeans, for more than a hundred years."

For Minot, as for many Germans on both sides of the debate, the question of bailouts goes beyond narrow self interest. It gets at what it means to be German, and what it means to be European.

Klaus Frankenberger, an editor at the newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, points to the painful labor reforms Germany went through a few years ago.

Read more

Robert Krulwich works on radio, podcasts, video, the blogosphere. He has been called "the most inventive network reporter in television" by TV Guide.

Krulwich is a Science Correspondent for NPR. His NPR blog, "Krulwich Wonders" features drawings, cartoons and videos that illustrate hard-to-see concepts in science.

He is the co-host of Radiolab, a nationally distributed radio/podcast series that explores new developments in science for people who are curious but not usually drawn to science shows. "There's nothing like it on the radio," says Ira Glass of This American Life, "It's a act of crazy genius." Radiolab won a Peabody Award in 2011.

Krulwich Wonders...
12:01 am
Wed September 28, 2011

Wanna Live Forever? Become A Noun

Adam Cole NPR

Adam: When I say "Henry Shrapnel, Jules Leotard, Robert Bunsen," you think — what?
Me: That they're inventors?
Adam: No. Better than that. Each one has become immortal. They're nouns!
Me: Is that a good thing, becoming a noun? ...
Adam: Are you kidding? It's a wonderful thing. A thing to sing about.
Me: You're going to sing?
Adam: If I may ...

Read more
The Two-Way
8:08 pm
Tue September 27, 2011

Pakistan's Foreign Minister: 'Blame Game Is Counterproductive'

Hina Rabbani Khar, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Pakistan, addresses the United Nations' 66th General Assembly on Sept. 27.
Lou Rouse AFP/Getty Images

In an interview with Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep, Pakistan's foreign minister said her country and the United States "need each other" and "are fighting against the same people" but "Pakistan's dignity must not be compromised."

Read more
Around the Nation
6:30 pm
Tue September 27, 2011

Census: 131,729 Gay Couples Report They're Married

Originally published on Tue September 27, 2011 8:04 pm

The Census Bureau released a revised estimate Tuesday of the number of same-sex married couples living in the United States: More than 130,000 same-sex households recorded themselves as married. Another 500,000 same-sex households indentified themselves as unmarried.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:08 pm
Tue September 27, 2011

N.Y. Authorities Arrest Seven Accused Of Running SAT Cheating Ring

Sam Eshaghoff is accused of taking the SAT exam for six students in the span of two years.
Nassau County District Attorney

Seven former and current students from a prestigious New York high school have been arrested for allegedly running an SAT cheating ring.

The Nassau County district attorney announced today that Samuel Eshaghoff, a 19-year-old Emory University student, took the SAT exam for at least six John L. Miller Great Neck North High School students. Each one of those students paid Eshaghoff between $1,500 and $2,500. Eshagoff graduated from Great Neck in 2010.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:45 pm
Tue September 27, 2011

Israel Approves Building Of 1,100 Homes In East Jerusalem

A new construction site in the east Jerusalem Jewish settlement of Gilo.
Menahem Kahana AFP/Getty Images

In a move that's bound to stress Israeli-Palestinian relations further, Israel's Interior Ministry announced it would allow 1,100 Israeli homes to be built in East Jerusalem. Palestinians want that area as the capital of their future state.

Reporting from Jerusalem, NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro filed this report:

The homes will be built in Gilo, a huge east Jerusalem settlement. The United Nations and the European Union criticized the move today restating their position that settlement activity is illegal under international law.

Read more

Barbara Bradley Hagerty is the religion correspondent for NPR, reporting on the intersection of faith and politics, law, science and culture. Her New York Times best-selling book, "Fingerprints of God: The Search for the Science of Spirituality," was published by Riverhead/Penguin Group in May 2009. Among others, Barb has received the American Women in Radio and Television Award, the Headliners Award and the Religion Newswriters Association Award for radio reporting.

Shots - Health Blog
4:43 pm
Tue September 27, 2011

Problems Behind Drug Shortages Are Clear; Solutions Aren't

iStockphoto.com

A daylong session on drug shortages convened by the Food and Drug Administration documented lots of issues and no easy remedies.

Religion
4:39 pm
Tue September 27, 2011

The Hard Economics of High Holy Days

Over the next two weeks, some 5,000 people will fill the sanctuaries at Adas Israel Congregation in Washington, D.C., to pray, worship and remember their spiritual roots.

"Rosh Hashana is a time of renewal, and it's a time of reconnecting with what really matters for us as a Jewish people," Rabbi Gil Steinlauf says.

The Jewish New Year is a time of spiritual awe — and practical considerations. Unlike churches, most synagogues charge membership dues to keep the lights on and fund the programs, because they are autonomous and do not receive funding from a national body.

Read more

Pages