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6:16 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Spain's Olympic Basketball Team Takes Aim At U.S.

Spanish star Pau Gasol shoots over France's Ronny Turiaf during a pre-Olympic game earlier this month. Gasol, who regularly plays for the Los Angeles Lakers, was Spain's leading scorer in the 2008 Olympics, when the team won a silver medal. The Spaniards may have the best chance of upsetting the favored U.S. team at the London Olympics.
Kenzo Tribouillard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 2:43 pm

Spain is a country that partied for days after winning the European Soccer Championships earlier this month.

Soccer dominates the sports scene, and the Spanish side is favored to win Olympic gold in London this summer. But Spain is also a basketball powerhouse and is currently ranked No. 2 in the world behind the U.S.

At a school gym, you'll find Spaniards who actually know that. Basketball is growing in popularity among kids, especially girls.

"Basketball is a sport that's beautiful for me," says 13-year-old Lucia Gutierrez.

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AIDS: A Turning Point
6:09 am
Sun July 22, 2012

After Years Lost, South Africa Rejuvenates HIV Plan

Anti-AIDS posters hang in the Eshowe public health clinic in South Africa's Kwazulu-Natal province. Clinicians there are hoping to slow the spread of HIV by getting more people treatment.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 7:11 pm

With the largest HIV epidemic in the world, no nation has been more affected by HIV and AIDS than South Africa, but the country has also had one of the most conflicted responses to the epidemic.

A decade ago, as the virus was spreading rapidly, then-President Thabo Mbeki was questioning the link between HIV and AIDS. His health minister was advocating the use of beetroot, garlic and lemon juice to treat it.

Now, years later, South Africa is trying to make up for lost time. The nation is attempting to put in place a cutting-edge HIV treatment and prevention program.

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The Aurora Theater Shootings
6:08 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Suspect's Web Of Traps Part Of Calculated Plan

Police surround the apartment of James Holmes, the suspect in the Colorado theater shooting, on Friday in Aurora, Colo.
Chris Schneider Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 2:43 pm

Authorities in Aurora, Colo., on Saturday cleared scores of explosive devices from the apartment of the man suspected of killing 12 people and injuring more than 50 at a local movie theater.

Experts spent hours dismantling the labyrinth of trip wires and incendiary devices that filled the home of the suspect, 24-year-old James Holmes.

Yellow police tape stretched for blocks surrounding the apartment complex where Holmes lived. Ambulances, fire engines and police cars filled parking lots and streets.

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The Two-Way
6:59 pm
Sat July 21, 2012

Coroner Identifies Victims Of Aurora Shooting Spree

Jessica Ghawi.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 27, 2012 9:54 am

The Arapahoe County Coroner's Office has released the names of 11 of those killed in Friday's mass shooting in Aurora, Colo., during a midnight screening of The Dark Knight Rises. An additional victim was identified in a statement released by the family. Officials notified the families of all of the victims before publicly releasing the names.

This list will be updated as we learn more about each of those killed in the shooting.

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The Aurora Theater Shootings
5:05 pm
Sat July 21, 2012

Residents Struggle With Tragedy's 'Stain' On Aurora

Pastor Mary Lu Saddoris (left) prays with Isaac Pacheo (center) and Courtney McGregor near a photo of their friend Alex Sullivan on Saturday at a memorial near the movie theater in Aurora, Colo.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Sat July 21, 2012 5:24 pm

As investigators dig deeper into Friday's mass shootings at a movie theater in the Denver suburb of Aurora, residents also are trying to piece together what happened and what it means for their city.

Aurora is Colorado's third-largest city, but it's probably not one many people had heard of before now.

Sitting in a cafe, life-long resident Joseph Nguyen says it's unfair his city will now be associated with the tragic attack that left 12 people dead and dozens more injured.

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Around the Nation
5:05 pm
Sat July 21, 2012

Search Continues For Clues In Shooting Aftermath

Originally published on Sat July 21, 2012 5:24 pm

Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz speaks with NPR's Carrie Kahn about the latest on the investigation into the shooting in Aurora, Colo., which occurred early Friday morning during a midnight screening of the new Batman film, The Dark Knight Rises.

Why Music Matters
5:05 pm
Sat July 21, 2012

Fleeing Iran After A Fateful Gig

Aria Saadi is an Iranian-born musician and actor, who fled the country several years ago and is currently based in Canada.
KEXP

Originally published on Sat July 21, 2012 5:24 pm

Weekends on All Things Considered continues its "Why Music Matters" series with Aria Saadi, an actor and musician originally from Iran. Saadi now lives and works in Vancouver, Canada, where he escaped after running afoul of the Iranian government.

Saadi says he remembers well one of his first encounters with Iranian authorities. A self-taught keyboard player, he was performing at what most Americans would call a normal party.

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Author Interviews
4:57 pm
Sat July 21, 2012

From Juvie To J.D.: The Story Of A 'Runaway Girl'

Originally published on Sat July 21, 2012 5:24 pm

When Carissa Phelps was 12, she dropped out of seventh grade in the small town of Coalinga, Calif. Her homelife was dysfunctional and soon, she ran away.

Her life on the streets took its toll, and before long the unthinkable happened: she was kidnapped by a pimp and forced into prostitution.

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Health
4:32 pm
Sat July 21, 2012

Say 'Ahhh': A Simpler Way To Detect Parkinson's

Mathematician Max Little has come up with an algorithm that can detect Parkinson's just using a person's voice.
Courtesy of Max Little

Originally published on Sat July 21, 2012 8:45 pm

There's currently no cure for Parkinson's, a debilitating neurological disease. There's also no blood test that can detect it, meaning early intervention is almost impossible.

But soon there might be a shockingly easy way to screen for Parkinson's disease. It would be as simple as picking up the telephone and saying "ahhh."

"There's some evidence, admittedly weak, that voice disturbances may well be one of the first or early indicator of the disease," mathematician Max Little tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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History
4:24 pm
Sat July 21, 2012

Immigration, The Gold Mountain And A Wedding Photo

Wedding photograph of Wong Lan Fong and Yee Shew Ning, 1926.
U.S. National Archives and Records

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 7:50 pm

Deep inside the National Archives in Washington, D.C., old case files tell the stories of hundreds of thousands of hopeful immigrants to the U.S. between 1880 and the end of World War II.

These stories are in the form of original documents and photographs that were often attached to immigrant case files. Many of them are part of a new exhibit at the Archives, called "Attachments."

For University of Minnesota history professor Erika Lee, one of these attachments turned out to be very special.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:02 pm
Sat July 21, 2012

A Musician And The Audition Of His Life

To audition for the BSO, percussionist Mike Tetreault was required to prepare musical excerpts from 50 pieces on nine different instruments, including timpani.
Sean Hagwell Mike Tetreault

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:18 pm

Earlier this year, classical percussionist Mike Tetreault walked onstage at Symphony Hall in Boston for the audition of a lifetime: The Boston Symphony Orchestra was looking for not just one but two new percussionists.

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The Two-Way
11:04 am
Sat July 21, 2012

Other Top Stories: Ferry Accident In Tanzania; More Fighting In Syria

Originally published on Sat July 21, 2012 12:22 pm

While the shooting rampage in Aurora, Colo., is dominating the news today, there are other headlines:

-- "146 Presumed Dead In Tanzania Ferry Accident." (The Associated Press)

-- "Syrian Forces Battle Rebels In Aleppo." (Reuters)

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The Two-Way
9:23 am
Sat July 21, 2012

Aurora Rampage Joins Grim List Of Worst Mass Shootings

A memorial outside the movie theater in Aurora, Co., where 12 people died and about 58 were wounded by a gunman early Friday.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

When tragedies happen, comparisons are always made to past events. It's become part of the news coverage of the Aurora, Colo., theater rampage to refer to it as "one of the deadliest mass shootings in recent U.S. history," as The Associated Press says.

The wire service has a list — "Some of the world's worst mass shootings" — that includes many that happened in the U.S.:

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The Two-Way
8:18 am
Sat July 21, 2012

Aurora Suspect: A 'Smart And Quiet Man' Who Allegedly Hid A 'Deadly Plan'

A photo of James Holmes released by the University of Colorado Denver.
University of Colorado Denver

Originally published on Sat July 21, 2012 1:35 pm

The Denver Post continues to dig into the life of James Eagan Holmes, the 24-year-old suspect in the shooting rampage Friday in Aurora, Colo., that left at least 12 people dead and about 58 wounded.

Friday, as Eyder wrote, an image emerged of Holmes as something of a recluse.

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NPR Story
7:35 am
Sat July 21, 2012

'Our Kind': Unpacking Misconceptions About AIDS

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A new book about global attitudes to the AIDS epidemic in Africa, lays some of the blame at the door of Joseph Conrad. Conrad's novel "Heart of Darkness," says the author - who's Uzodinma Iweala - connected inferiority and disease with Africa and Africans, in way which is still evident today. Uzodinma Iweala was himself was born in Washington D.C., the city with the worst incidence of AIDS in the United States. His first book, a novel called "Beasts of No Nation," told the harrowing story of child soldiers in Africa.

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NPR Story
7:35 am
Sat July 21, 2012

Tragedy In Colo. Hits Movie Audiences Nationwide

The phrase "theater number 9" may soon be one of those added to our collective memory. That is where the shootings in Aurora, Colo., took place. It has some movie goers wondering about their safety in cities across the country.

NPR Story
7:35 am
Sat July 21, 2012

What's Coming Over The Olympic Horizon

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. And it's time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPORTS THEME MUSIC)

SIMON: OK, maybe that should be the (hums Olympic theme) because in just a few days, all the pomp and patriotism, the grit and athleticism, the sweat and pomposity of the 2010 Olympic Summer Games begins. Here with a preview NPR's Tom Goldman joins us. Tom, thanks so much for being with us.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Did I just hear doves released in the studio there, Scott?

(LAUGHTER)

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Mental Health
7:35 am
Sat July 21, 2012

Treating Mental Trauma: Lessons From Tragedy

Host Scott Simon talks with Tom Olbrich of the Jefferson Center for Mental Health in Denver about some of the lessons learned about treating patients post-Columbine shooting.

Around the Nation
7:35 am
Sat July 21, 2012

Aurora Businesses Pull Resources To Help Victims

Businesses in Aurora, Colo., sprang into action Friday to assist victims and their families. Kevin Hougen, president of the Aurora Chamber of Commerce, worked with businesses to help provide necessities to victims of the shooting. Host Scott Simon spoke with Hougen Friday from his office, which overlooks the movie theater.

Around the Nation
7:35 am
Sat July 21, 2012

Deadly Shootings Put Politics In Suspense

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

American flags are flying at half-staff today over the White House, and elsewhere in the country. The shootings in Aurora have silenced politics as usual - at least, for the moment. The Romney and Obama campaigns have both pulled their TV ads from the air in Colorado, a state that had three top political advertising markets in the country this week. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports on a somber day on the campaign trail.

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Middle East
7:35 am
Sat July 21, 2012

Stream Of Refugees Leave Syria With Heavy Violence

Opposition activists in Syria report that there's been another day of heavy shelling in a number of cities, as rebel fighters continue their guerrilla war to topple President Bashar Assad. Host Scott Simon talks with NPR's Peter Kenyon in Beirut, which has seen a huge increase in refugees in recent days.

Middle East
7:35 am
Sat July 21, 2012

In Syria, An Urgent Effort To Organize Rebels

Members of the group Hamza Abdualmuttalib trained this week near the Syrian city of Aleppo.
Bulent Kilic AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 21, 2012 9:47 pm

The battle for Syria appears to have reached a decisive stage. Tanks are on the streets of Damascus as civilians flee the city, and rebels have seized outposts on the borders with Turkey and Iraq.

The opposition has shown a surprising military capability over the past few days. As fighting intensifies in the Syrian capital, there's an urgent push under way to organize the rebel force.

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Economy
7:35 am
Sat July 21, 2012

LIBOR Spotlight Shifts To U.S. Regulators

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

There's another dimension to that unfolding LIBOR scandal which cost Barclays, the British bank, its CEO and $450 million in fines after it was revealed that the bank had been manipulating international lending rates. Attention has shifted to why U.S. financial regulators, who knew about the rate rigging, didn't move to stop it more swiftly.

We're going to put that question to Robert Smith, correspondent for NPR's Planet Money. He joins us from New York. Robert, thanks for being with us.

ROBERT SMITH, BYLINE: My pleasure.

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Around the Nation
7:35 am
Sat July 21, 2012

How Columbine Shaped Police Response To Shootings

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Around the Nation
7:35 am
Sat July 21, 2012

Man-Volvo Love Story May Hit 3 Million-Mile Mark

Host Scott Simon talks with 72-year-old Irv Gordon. His 1966 Volvo P1800S needs about 30,000 more miles to reach the 3 million-mile mark. His license plate reads, "MILNMILER."

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