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Africa
4:06 am
Fri May 25, 2012

How Crumbling U.S. Dollars Bailed Out Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe now uses the U.S. dollar as its main currency, though the bills are often extremely dirty and falling apart due to constant use. Here a cashier holds U.S. dollars in good condition at a supermarket in the capital Harare in 2009.
Kate Holt Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:17 pm

Four years ago, Zimbabwe experienced one of the worst cases of hyperinflation in history. The country abandoned its own currency and switched to the U.S. dollar — a move experts say prevented a complete economic collapse.

But using American dollars has created a host of bizarre issues. The bills are filthy, crumbling and often in short supply. There are no U.S. coins to make change, so chocolate is handed out instead. There is, oddly, an abundance of $2 bills.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:51 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Dispatchers' CPR Coaching Saves Lives When Every Minute Counts

Becky Cole was eight months pregnant with her son Ryan when she passed out. Her husband performed CPR for six minutes with the help of a dispatcher before medics arrived.
Courtesy of Medic One Foundation

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:09 am

Your chances of surviving a sudden heart attack may depend on where you live; some American cities have survival rates five times higher than others. One difference can be 911 dispatchers.

If they coach someone over the phone to give CPR, the chance of surviving goes up. There's now a push to make it universal, but some cities are slow to implement the necessary training.

Becky Cole was eight months pregnant with her fourth child when she collapsed against the bathroom door. It was January 2011 in the Seattle suburb of Woodinville.

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Around the Nation
3:50 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Walk This Way: Crossing The Golden Gate Bridge

More than 200,000 people crossed the bridge the day it opened in 1937. Many walked. Others ran, tap-danced, roller-skated, unicycled, or strode on stilts.
Courtesy of GoldenGateBridge.org

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 2:15 pm

On May 27, 1937, San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge opened, connecting bustling San Francisco to sleepy Marin County to the north. The Oakland-Bay Bridge had opened six months earlier — but the Golden Gate was an engineering triumph. It straddles the Golden Gate Strait, the passage from the Pacific Ocean into the San Francisco Bay, where rough currents prevail and winds can reach 70 mph.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:48 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Need A Nurse? You May Have To Wait

Some fear that with rising medical costs and an aging population, the country's nursing staff will be stretched too thin.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:15 pm

Nurses are the backbone of the hospital — just ask pretty much any doctor or patient. But a new poll conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health finds 34 percent of patients hospitalized for at least one night in the past year said "nurses weren't available when needed or didn't respond quickly to requests for help."

Since nurses provide most of the patient care in hospitals, we were surprised at the findings. We wanted to find out more. We wanted to know what was going on from nurses themselves. So we put a call-out on Facebook.

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Europe
3:33 am
Fri May 25, 2012

To Tap Arctic Oil, Russia Partners With Exxon Mobil

A Rosneft flag flies over the Russian oil giant's refinery near the city of Samara. Growth of Russia's oil and gas output has stalled, but Exxon Mobil and other foreign firms have signed deals to help exploit the Arctic.
Nikolay Korchekov Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:09 am

Russia is still the world's largest producer of oil and gas, but growth has stalled and to get to new supplies requires going to a very difficult place — the Arctic.

"If you want to be in this business in 2020, 2025, you must think about the Arctic," says Konstantin Simonov, head of the National Energy Security Fund in Moscow.

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Music News
3:30 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Eurovision 2012: The Babushkas Make It To The Final

Russia's singing group Buranovskiye Babushki hold their national flag as they celebrate making it through to the Eurovision final on May 22 with Moldova's entrant, Pasha Parfeny (left), and his dancers.
Vano Shlamov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:26 am

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StoryCorps
3:29 am
Fri May 25, 2012

The Day Taps Echoed Through Belgium's Hills

After Harrison Wright was drafted into the U.S. Army as a teenager in 1943, he became a bugler.
Courtesy of Harrison Wright

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 10:09 am

During World War II, Harrison Wright served with the Army in Europe. And as he recalls during a visit to StoryCorps with his grandson Sean Guess, he was sent on a very special assignment to mark the end of the war.

Wright was drafted in March 1943.

"I was an 18-year-old boy," he says. "I blew the bugle in our outfit," he adds, largely because he had played the trumpet in high school.

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Law
7:32 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Suspect Arrested In Etan Patz Kidnapping Case

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. In New York City, a decades old missing child case may have been solved. In 1979, a 6-year-old boy named Etan Patz disappeared as he was walking to school. Thirty-three years later, almost to the day, police say they have a suspect under arrest and his confession. That suspect is Pedro Hernandez, now 51 years old.

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Law
7:05 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

The Face That Changed The Search For Missing Kids

Etan Patz on the "lost child" poster issued after his 1979 disappearance.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 4:31 pm

Etan Patz's disappearance haunted his family for decades. The arrest Thursday of a man who reportedly confessed to killing the 6-year-old back in 1979 may finally end their uncertainty.

There's no doubt, though, about the impact his abduction had nationally: It changed the way society and the legal system respond to missing children.

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The Two-Way
6:55 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Co-Owner Of Pentagon Propaganda Contractor Admits Attacking Journalists

The Leonie Industries website.
Leonie Industries

The co-owner of a propaganda firm that received about $120 million in Pentagon contracts since 2009 has admitted to running a misinformation campaign against USA Today journalists.

Leonie Industries put out a statement today saying the campaign was run by Camille Chidiac, who owns 49 percent of the company, using "non-Leonie funds to participate in the online activity."

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The Two-Way
5:35 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Egyptian Activist: Even The Confusion Is A Success

On tonight's All Things Considered, Robert Siegel talks with three prominent Egyptians. One of them, Dalia Ziada, is an activist and founder of the Justice Party.

Robert asked how the last two days have felt, how it felt to see many of her fellow Egyptians cast their first ballot. She said:

"It feels like celebrating a festival or something everyone is very is very excited about the idea of having a new president but [everyone is] very confused as well.

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All Tech Considered
5:32 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Friend Your Students? New York City Schools Say No

New York City's Department of Education issued its first guidelines this spring for how teachers should navigate social media.
Facebook

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

English teacher Eleanor Terry started a Facebook page last fall for the High School for Telecommunication Arts and Technology in Brooklyn. She uses it for the school's college office to remind seniors about things like application deadlines. The seniors use it to stay in touch with each other.

"There was a student who got into the University of Chicago," she says, "and the way we found out about it was that they scanned their acceptance letter and then tagged us in it."

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Election 2012
5:25 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

N.C. Democrats Try To Dust Off Pre-Convention Blues

The audience listens as President Obama speaks about student loans at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill last month.
Larry Downing Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 10:14 am

The Democratic Party will hold its national convention in Charlotte this September. The choice of venue was a signal that North Carolina would be a key part of President Obama's re-election strategy.

But the state's Democrats have suffered a few blows lately.

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The Two-Way
5:12 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

New Revenue Deal Means Olympics Could Now Return To U.S.

The United States and International Olympic Committees have formally announced a revenue-sharing agreement that paves the way for the return of the Olympics to the U.S.

Details of the deal were not released but sources familiar with it say it guarantees the U.S. Olympic Committee (USOC) at least $110 million a year from international Olympic sponsorships and the American rights to televise the games.

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Election 2012
5:02 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

GOP Hopes Pennsylvania's Still Got That Swing

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney participates in a 6th-grade language arts class with Salina Beattie and other students at Universal Bluford Charter School on Thursday in Philadelphia.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney was talking about education policy Thursday in Philadelphia.

Pennsylvania, with its 20 electoral votes, is a frequent stop for presidential candidates. But, amid a campaign likely to focus on a handful of battleground states, some are starting to wonder if Pennsylvania is still a swing state.

At the Universal Bluford Charter School in a largely African-American neighborhood in West Philadelphia, Romney toured a computer lab, helped students with an assignment in language arts class and listened to the kids sing.

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The Two-Way
4:15 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Massive Solar Plane Tries For First Transcontinental Flight

The Swiss sun-powered aircraft Solar Impulse takes off on Thursday in Payerne on its first attempted intercontinental flight from Switzerland to Morocco.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 10:45 pm

The Solar Impulse, a solar-powered airplane with the wing-span of a jumbo jet, took off from Switzerland today on its first attempt to complete a transcontinental flight.

The AP reports:

"Fog on the runaway at its home base in Payerne, Switzerland, delayed the take off by two hours, demonstrating how susceptible the prototype single-seater aircraft is to adverse weather.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:05 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

What's Up, Doc? When Your Doctor Rushes Like The Road Runner

Patients continue to complain that physicians don't spend enough time examining and talking with them.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

To physician Larry Shore of My Health Medical Group in San Francisco, it's no surprise that patients give doctors low marks for time and attention.

"There's some data to suggest that the average patient gets to speak for between 12 and 15 seconds before the physician interrupts them," Shore says. "And that makes you feel like the person is not listening."

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It's All Politics
3:59 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Sequestered At The Edwards Trial, And I'm Not On The Jury

John Edwards arrives with his daughter, Cate Edwards, at U.S. District Court in Greensboro, N.C., on May 17 for closing arguments in his trial. The former Democratic presidential candidate has pleaded not guilty to six counts of campaign finance violations.
Sara D. Davis Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 4:24 pm

One day last week, I was entering the federal courthouse in Greensboro, N.C., where John Edwards is on trial, when a U.S. marshal took my local newspaper. A moment later, he told ABC News correspondent Bob Woodruff to hand over his morning paper.

"We can't have newspapers?" I asked.

"You guys know the rules," the smiling marshal said.

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The Salt
3:53 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

A Meat Mea Culpa: What Went Wrong With 'Pink Slime'

May cover of Meatingplace, the meat processing industry trade magazine
courtesy Meatingplace

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 4:47 pm

It came as no surprise to us when outrage over "pink slime," the catchy nickname given to lean finely textured beef (LFTB), went viral a couple of months ago.

Murky government rules, off-limits meatpacking floors, and a "gotcha" media mentality have created a fear and mistrust that's left the public highly opinionated but often woefully misinformed about where our food comes from.

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Music Interviews
3:04 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Regina Spektor Still Doesn't Write Anything Down

The songs on What We Saw From the Cheap Seats don't come just from the past year but from a span of "10 years or more," Regina Spektor says.
Shervin Lainez

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

In 2004, singer-songwriter Regina Spektor was a staple of the so-called anti-folk scene when she sat down for one of her first public-radio interviews with the now-defunct WNYC program The Next Big Thing. In the interview, she joked that she stayed up until 3:30 a.m. writing a song, trying not to wake the neighbors, but never wrote anything down.

She still doesn't.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Not What You Thought: Americans On Taxes; Blacks On Gay Marriage

Dr. Patrick Wooden, senior pastor of the Upper Room Church of God In Christ in North Carolina, celebrates early returns that show strong support for Amendment One, which bans gay marriage in the state.
Robert Willett Raleigh News

We like when conventional wisdom is challenged. And during the past couple of days, we stumbled on two stories that challenged assumptions both the news media and Americans seem to make.

First, Reuters compares Americans to anorexics when it comes to taxes. Essentially, they say when Americans respond to polls, they see themselves as "fat with taxes." It's the one thing both political parties agree on. But taking a look in the global mirror, Americans are actually quite skinny.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:53 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Doctors Look Likely To Resist Change On PSA Tests

Did they talk first?
iStockphoto.com

Forgive me, if you're suffering from PSA policy fatigue.

But there are a few more things I thought you might want to know about the new guideline from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that says men of all ages should forgo routine blood tests to detect prostate cancer.

Research from Johns Hopkins suggests the chances that doctors will listen aren't great.

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The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

In Annual Human Rights Report, U.S. Says China's Record Is Deteriorating

In its yearly report on Human Rights, the U.S. State Department noted that 2011 was tumultuous. Some countries — for example, Tunisia, which kicked off the Arab Spring — made strides while others fell back on their human rights records.

Here are a few highlights from the report:

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The Two-Way
1:59 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Kid Told Westboro Protesters 'God Hates No One' Because, 'That Is True'

Josef Miles, making his own statement.
Patty Akrouche Facebook.com/FeverDreams
  • From 'Tell Me More': Josef Miles and his mom

"I just don't like seeing those signs and I kind of wanted to put a stop to that."

That's 9-year-old Josef Miles' simple explanation for why he held up a notepad that said "GOD HATES NO ONE" as supporters of the tiny Westboro Baptist Church staged another small demonstration featuring their signs that say God hates homosexuals.

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It's All Politics
1:36 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Researchers Find Link Between Isolated State Capitals, Corruption

Despite the misspelling and grammar error, the tee-shirt message is clear on a protester at the Illinois capitol on May 16, 2012. It cites two former governors now in federal prison for corruption.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 1:56 pm

Do state capitals relatively distant from the major population centers have more corruption than those in more densely populated areas?

Researchers report that they have found an intriguing correlation between political corruption in state capitals and population density.

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