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Photos of Air Force moms breast-feeding in uniform recently went viral and sparked debate. The photos were meant to support military moms in breast-feeding. But some critics say the photos are disrespectful to the uniform. Host Michel Martin discusses the issue with active and retired military moms, including one who was featured in the photos.

Do Plastic Bags Bans Help The Environment?

Jun 5, 2012

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, during his long and varied career, Oscar winner Morgan Freeman has played everyone from soldiers to servants, from cowboys to criminals - not to mention the almighty. In a moment, he'll tell us what music he plays for inspiration. That's our feature we call In Your Ear, and it's just ahead.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, a picture of military moms breastfeeding their children has gone viral and it's raising questions about what's appropriate for women in uniform. We'll speak with one of the women in the picture about why she did it and the reaction to it. That's in just a few minutes. But first, voters are casting ballots in several states today and many political observers will look to the results for clues about the battle for the White House.

(Did you read our headline? Think twice before clicking "play.")

Dutch artist Bart Jansen says he loved his cat, Orville.

Wisconsin votes on recalling its governor Tuesday, and much has already been made of that vote's potential implications beyond the state.

But for now, this historic moment belongs to the 3 million-plus Wisconsinites registered to vote. Most of them are expected to turn out, and those who do will be thinking about the implications for Wisconsin more than the prospects for fallout elsewhere.

Cancer prevention guidelines recommend that men and women get screened for colorectal cancer every 10 years between the ages of 50 and 75.

Four days of celebrating Queen Elizabeth II's 60th year on the throne are coming to an end as the U.K. wraps up the Diamond Jubilee festivities in London.

(NPR's Larry Abramson is among the correspondents traveling with Defense Secretary Leon Panetta in Asia this week. Monday, he told us about a poignant exchange of artifacts. Today, he gives us a glimpse of what it's like to be in the secretary's motorcade.)

Calling them "persona non grata," Syria today told 17 diplomats — including the U.S. ambassador — that they are no longer welcome in the country.

Jury selection starts today in the trial of former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, who faces allegations that he sexually abused at least 10 boys over 15 years, sometimes on the school's campus. Sandusky has pleaded innocent.

"A torrential downpour and strong winds prevented emergency crews from returning Tuesday morning to a devastated neighborhood where a commercial airliner crashed, killing all 153 people aboard the plane and an undetermined number of people on the ground," The Associated Press reports from Lagos.

The wire service adds that:

Polls open at 7 a.m. local time (8 a.m. ET) in Wisconsin, where the bitter battle over whether to recall Republican Gov. Scott Walker is finally coming to a conclusion.

Artist Takes Taxidermy To New Heights

Jun 5, 2012

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Castle In Phoenix Sells For $1.5 Million

Jun 5, 2012

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The man described as al-Qaida's "leading propagandist" and the No. 2 leader in that terrorist organization was killed by a U.S. drone strike in Pakistan on Monday, NPR, CNN and The Associated Press say they've been told by "a U.S. official."

That word came around 1:40 p.m. ET.

Our original post. Reports: Drone Strike Targeted Al-Qaida's 'Leading Propagandist'

Part of the Family Matters series

Some financial problems have obvious solutions.

For example, colleges aren't graduating enough engineers. But as more students become wary of fat loans and slim job prospects, many may shift majors. Change is possible.

But that's not the case with this problem: The number of elderly Americans in need of expensive care is about to surge, and there's no stopping the calendar.

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And the Senate votes today on legislation aimed at shrinking the pay gap between men and women. It's called the Paycheck Fairness Act.

NPR's Ari Shapiro reports President Obama is using the bill as a tool in the 2012 campaign.

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You might say there's a tectonic shift going on in morning television. TV critic Eric Deggans says that ABC's "Good Morning America" is doing something that seemed unthinkable for more than a decade: it is rocking NBC'S "Today Show" off its ratings pedestal.

ERIC DEGGANS: Even "Today" show co-host Matt Lauer admits it.

MATT LAUER: The show is not where I want it to be right now. The ratings are not where I want them to be right now.

DONNY DEUTSCH: Where do you want to be right now?

Hollywood studios are dealing with big budget flops and the release of G.I. Joe: Retaliation has been postponed until March. Kim Masters, host of The Business, and editor at large for The Hollywood Reporter, talks to Renee Montagne about the summer woes at movie studios.

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Disney To Restrict Junk Food Ads

Jun 5, 2012
Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR's business news starts with Disney delving into nutrition.

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This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

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And I'm David Greene.

The Last Word In Business

Jun 5, 2012

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And our last word in business this morning is: Jubilation.

Hundreds of thousands of Britons gathered outside Buckingham Palace last night for the Diamond Jubilee concert, celebrating the queen's 60-year reign. The evening offered a break from Britain's bad economic news and another opportunity to rebrand positively the Royal Family.

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The massacre in the place known as Houla has kept worldwide attention on the relentless violence in Syria. Western countries and the United Nations blame Syrian government troops and pro-government thugs for killing more than a hundred people, nearly half of them children. NPR's Kelly McEvers made a closer examination of those events and found that's only part of the picture.

Republican Gov. Scott Walker faces Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett in a recall election Tuesday that has attracted a lot of outside money. The attempt to remove Walker came after he successfully pushed to limit collective bargaining rights for public sector unions.

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