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Business
12:24 pm
Fri October 14, 2011

A Twitter Push To Keep Chiquita From Splitting Town

Cincinnati and Charlotte, N.C., are similar in size and culture, and now they are going head to head in an effort to gain the favor of Chiquita. The fruit company is considering moving its Cincinnati headquarters, taking more than 300 jobs with it.

Residents of both cities refuse to sit idly by. They have taken to Twitter to communicate directly with the company's chief executive officer, Fernando Aguirre.

Aguirre spends a lot of time tweeting, from talking about his job to complimenting people to commenting on baseball.

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The Two-Way
11:17 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Listen Up: Here's How Some Piranhas Bark Before They Bite

A red-bellied piranha. You don't want to hear one.

Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

We're not recommending you dive in to some South American stream to see if you can hear them do this, but this is just too interesting not to pass along.

National Geographic writes that:

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Asia
11:01 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Judge Resigns, Casting Doubt Over Khmer Rouge Trials

In this undated photo, a man cleans a skull near a mass grave at the Choeung Ek camp outside Phnom Penh, Cambodia — the best known of the killing fields run by the Khmer Rouge in the middle and late 1970s. Now, Cambodians are skeptical that a U.N.-backed tribunal will be able to deliver justice in the case of four remaining high-level Khmer Rouge officials.

Jeff Widener AP

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 12:05 pm

Long running and frequently delayed, the legal cases against former leaders of the Khmer Rouge are now in danger of being terminated before many of their victims get the justice they've sought.

A German judge resigned this month from the U.N.-backed Khmer Rouge tribunal. The judge, Siegfried Blunk, felt Cambodian officials were obstructing efforts to investigate the crimes of the Khmer Rouge, which is believed to have killed as many as 2 million of its own citizens between 1975 and 1979.

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The Two-Way
10:26 am
Fri October 14, 2011

If You're So Inclined, Don A Black Turtleneck For 'Steve Jobs Day'

Here's the look, and the website.

stevejobsday2011.com

Most fans of the late co-founder of Apple probably already know, but just in case:

Some folks have declared this to be "Steve Jobs Day," and are encouraging others to "Sport your black turtleneck, jeans, tennis shoes, and glasses and snap a pic!" They're also making it easy to donate money to cancer research in Jobs' memory.

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The Salt
10:25 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Scientists Seek A Break In Aquaculture's Fish-Eat-Fish Chain

Fish feed contains fishmeal and fish oil

Kristofor Husted NPR

Aquaculture, one of the fastest growing sectors of agriculture in the U.S., combats the global dilemma of depleting wild fish populations. But a new report from the group Food & Water Watch says factory fish farms risk the health of other, stable species swimming in the sea. One of the biggest problems? The fish food.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:05 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Early Deadline For Medicare Enrollment This Year

Medicare beneficiaries who want to switch drug plans will have to make a decision earlier than usual this year.

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri October 14, 2011 10:29 am

The holiday shopping season seems to start earlier every year. And this year, Medicare's open enrollment season also begins — and ends — earlier than ever.

The annual enrollment period for privately run Medicare Advantage plans and prescription drug benefits starts Saturday, rather than in mid-November as in past years. The deadline for enrollment has also been pushed up — to Dec. 7 from Dec. 31. But the enrollment season is now a week longer, so it's not all bad news.

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The Two-Way
9:47 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Death Toll In Syria Exceeds 3,000, UN Says

Saying that the government's uses of "excessive force to crush peaceful protests" has led to a "devastatingly remorseless toll of human lives," the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights reported today that more than 3,000 people have now died because of the violence in Syria in recent months.

And at least 187 of the fatalities were children, Commissioner Navi Pillay added.

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Retail Sales Rose 1.1 Percent In September

Originally published on Fri October 14, 2011 8:53 am

Driven by gains at car dealers, U.S. retail sales rose 1.1 percent in September from August, the Census Bureau just reported.

It's the strongest one-month gain since February's 1.3 percent increase.

And sales were up 7.9 percent from September 2010, Census adds.

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The Two-Way
8:38 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Berlusconi Survives Confidence Vote

Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi sat in the lower chamber during today's confidence vote.

Gregorio Borgia AP

Originally published on Fri October 14, 2011 8:52 am

Breaking news from The Associated Press:

"Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi survives confidence vote in Parliament."

The BBC says "Berlusconi won the vote by 316 to 301, the bare minimum he needed." That, it adds, "presages trouble ahead. ... If Mr Berlusconi has to get a vote of confidence on every issue, he will find it very difficult to govern."

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The Two-Way
8:09 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Bartender Who Famously Shamed A Nasty Non-Tipper Got Wrong Guy

The receipt that started it all.

Victoria Liss seattlepi.com

Don't "drunk dial" an old lover.

Double check the "To" address before sending an email about your incompetent boss.

And if someone really ticks you off, sleep on it before posting about what happened. You might decide in the morning that it's best left unsaid.

That last bit of advice comes to mind with the story of a Seattle bartender who exposed a "nasty non-tipper" on her Facebook page and mistakenly identified the wrong guy — causing headaches not only for him but for her as well.

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Europe
7:34 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Touring In Scotland, Bob Dylan Buys Bagpipes

Scotland's National Piping Center reports that Bob Dylan doesn't know how to play the bagpipes. But a spokesperson says "he's always wanted to learn."

Around the Nation
7:25 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Police Chase Down Toll Cheating Trucker

Port Authority police say Nelson Vaquiz tried an ingenious way to avoid the toll for trucks crossing the George Washington Bridge into New York. They say as Vaquiz drove through a gateless toll lane, he pulled on a cable that flipped up his license plate so cameras couldn't read it.

The Two-Way
7:15 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Occupy Wall Street Park Cleanup Postponed

The scene at Zuccotti Park on Thursday as Occupy Wall Street protesters started their own cleanup.Â

Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Today's planned cleanup of Zuccotti Park in lower Manhattan, where Occupy Wall Street protesters have been camped out for a month, has been postponed — bringing cheers and relief to those in the park, who thought the move might have been a ruse designed to evict or arrest them.

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Movies
6:55 am
Fri October 14, 2011

The Dancing Is Hotter In 'Footloose' 2011

As long as daughters pout when fathers proclaim, "I don't want you to see that boy," Footloose will endure. As long as kids want to dance and Hollywood wants to profit from that passion, it will do more than endure. It will be remade.

Fine Art
6:50 am
Fri October 14, 2011

'A Fisherman's Daughter' Returned To Rightful Owner

During World War One, German troops stole a painting from a French museum. Nearly a century later, "A Fisherman's Daughter" by French artist Jules Breton has been returned to the government of France.

Photography
6:45 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Debts Resolved, Annie Leibovitz Opens New Exhibit

Annie Leibovitz has shot some of the world's most famous portraits — from John Lennon to President Obama. And yet she risked losing ownership of her works to pay off a loan. That was 2009. Leibovitz says she's learned her lesson and is on better financial footing. She's opened a new exhibit in Russia.

Business
4:00 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Romney Pledges To Take On Unfair Business Practices

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney took on U.S. trade policy during a speech yesterday at the Microsoft campus in Redmond, Washington. From member station KUOW in Seattle, Amy Radil reports.

Business
4:00 am
Fri October 14, 2011

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

Business
4:00 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Ala. Immigration Law Has Potential Workers Leaving The State

Alabama business owners are furious about the state's new immigration law. They say it is costing them business. Some wonder if the state will ultimately change the law, which is leading legal and illegal immigrants to flee the state.

Election 2012
4:00 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Scott Simon To Interview Herman Cain

Steve Inskeep has a preview of Scott Simon's upcoming interview with Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain.

Business
4:00 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

National Security
12:14 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Defending Defense Contracts: Programs Turn To PR

In southern Arizona, troops take part in a large-scale search-and-rescue exercise called Operation Angel Thunder.

Ted Robbins NPR

Originally published on Fri October 14, 2011 5:45 pm

Five Air Force Pave Hawk helicopters are parked or landing in the high desert east of Tucson, Ariz. They are transporting victims of a mock earthquake as part of a training exercise called Operation Angel Thunder.

"We were always known for staying really quiet and not really saying much," says Brett Hartnett, who started Operation Angel Thunder five years ago.

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Around the Nation
12:01 am
Fri October 14, 2011

A New Muesli Maker's Quest For The Cereal Aisle

Muesli Fusion for sale at the Rochester Public Market in Rochester, N.Y. Being a local brand has served owner Ian Szalinski well, but he has bigger plans for his cereal business.

Zack Seward for NPR

Originally published on Fri October 14, 2011 12:46 pm

Small businesses are often called the backbone of the U.S. economy; they employ about half of the nation's private sector employees. But in many cases, small companies start out with a workforce of just one — like cereal entrepreneur Ian Szalinski in Rochester, N.Y., who's trying to stake a claim to the breakfast market.

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Humans
12:01 am
Fri October 14, 2011

In African Cave, An Early Human Paint Shop

This abalone shell was found with ocher and a grinding stone. The iron oxide was used as a pigment to paint bodies and walls, as well as to thicken glue.

Science/AAAS

Apparently one of the earliest human instincts was to paint things, including bodies and cave walls. That's the conclusion from scientists who have discovered something remarkable in a South African cave — a tool kit for making paint. It looks to be the oldest evidence of paint-making.

Over in southern Africa 100,000 years ago, Homo sapiens was pretty new on the scene. A favorite hangout was a cave named Blombos near the Southern ocean.

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