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Education
8:00 am
Sun October 9, 2011

Undercover Student Tests A For-Profit College

Lately, for-profit colleges like DeVry, Kaplan and the University of Phoenix have been subject to scrutiny and new regulations for allegedly deceptive recruiting tactics and the high number of federal loan defaults among their students. Host Audie Cornish talks to Christopher Beha, who discreetly enrolled as a student at the University of Phoenix, and wrote about it in a piece in this month's issue of Harper's Magazine.

Politics
7:46 am
Sun October 9, 2011

Values Voters Lukewarm, But Romney Presses On

Originally published on Sun October 16, 2011 10:50 am

Social conservatives have wrapped up a two-day Values Voter Summit in Washington. Their goal is to keep the focus on issues such as abortion and gay marriage, even as the economy tops the list of concerns for most voters.

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Around the Nation
2:25 am
Sun October 9, 2011

Frightened Families On Front Line Of Ala. Immigration Battle

Roughly 80 people, most of them Spanish-speaking women and children, packed the media center of Tarrant Elementary School, just north of Birmingham, Ala., recently. Considering the number of kids in the room and spilling out into the hallways, there was surprisingly little noise.

It was a "Know Your Rights" meeting, meant to calm fears and familiarize families with their legal rights in light of Alabama's tough new immigration law.

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Law
12:58 am
Sun October 9, 2011

A Matter Of Interpretation: Justices Open Up

Supreme Court Justices Stephen Breyer (left) and Antonin Scalia testify during a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee Wednesday. The justices showed that while they are legal opposites, they are by no means opponents.

Alex Wong Getty Images

In a rare moment, two Supreme Court justices appeared before a Senate committee on Wednesday for a hearing about the role of judges under the U.S. Constitution. Among the topics of discussion was the granddaddy of all legal debates: how to interpret the Constitution.

Justice Antonin Scalia is a staunch conservative, what he calls an "originalist." He believes judges should determine the framers' original intent in the words of the constitution, and hew strictly to it.

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Around the Nation
4:44 pm
Sat October 8, 2011

It's A Bloody Business, Being A Demon

A closer look and you'll be dinner.

Courtesy of Blood Manor

It's October, which means the country's supply of fake cobwebs is getting dangerously low.

The reason, of course, are the commercial haunted houses opening for business, filling the night with the screams of terrified teenage girls.

Wait. That's actually me — at Blood Manor in New York City. From the name, you would never guess it's on the second floor of a downtown office building. It probably used to be a hedge fund.

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U.S.
4:37 pm
Sat October 8, 2011

Can The U.S. Economy Really Function Without Undocumented Workers?

We often speak about the immigration debate in terms of justice, rights and the protection of our borders, but there's a business story to be told as well. The question is: can the U.S. economy really function without undocumented workers?

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Author Interviews
3:30 pm
Sat October 8, 2011

Modern Horror Defined By Edgy Realism Of The 1970s

Jason Zinoman is a critic and reporter for The New York Times.

Earl Wilson

By the late 1960s, classic horror movies pioneered by Vincent Price and Boris Karloff had run out of steam. What took their place in the period after that was something different, edgier and altogether more terrifying.

"To some extent you could say that modern horror started with the Universal classics, but I do think there is this significant turning point starting in 1968," says Jason Zinoman, author of the new book Shock Value: How a Few Eccentric Outsiders Gave Us Nightmares, Conquered Hollywood, and Invented Modern Horror.

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Politics
3:00 pm
Sat October 8, 2011

Ron Paul Wins Straw Poll At Values Voter Summit

It's day two of the Values Voters Summit in Washington, D.C. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Robert Smith talks with NPR's Don Gonyea about the surprising results of a straw poll there today: Ron Paul won big, Herman Cain was a strong second, and Michele Bachmann, Rick Perry and Mitt Romney trailed badly.

Sports
3:00 pm
Sat October 8, 2011

Oakland Raiders Hall Of Famer Al Davis Dies

Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis died today at age 82. Davis was a legend in the football world and was largely responsible for building the Raiders into a three-time Super Bowl champion. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Robert Smith Robert Smith talks to sportswriter Peter Richmond, author of the book "Badasses: The Legend of Snake, Foo, Dr. Death, and John Madden's Oakland Raiders."

U.S.
3:00 pm
Sat October 8, 2011

Week In News: Visionary Steve Jobs Dies

The world lost a titan of industry this week with the passing of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Robert Smith speaks with James Fallows, national correspondent for The Atlantic, about the Jobs legacy and other stories from this past week.

Presidential Race
1:25 pm
Sat October 8, 2011

Ron Paul Wins Straw Poll At Values Voter Summit

Rep. Ron Paul of Texas pushed aside GOP presidential front-runners Mitt Romney and Texas Gov. Rick Perry in a straw poll at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C., on Saturday.

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Monkey See
8:46 am
Sat October 8, 2011

Sports From 'The Onion': A New Book Explores 'The Ecstasy Of Defeat'

Brett Favre, seen here looking bummed in 2010, is one of the many sports figures taking a drubbing in the new sports book from the editors of The Onion.

Jamie Squire Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 8, 2011 5:04 pm

I'm going to make a confession. I have enjoyed many of the same Onion headlines as everyone else over the years, from the exploits of presidents and Congress to the activities of store clerks and sad dads. But their sports coverage, while it's passed around somewhat less often and is a bit less well-known, is generally my favorite stuff they do.

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Politics
8:18 am
Sat October 8, 2011

Values Voters Given Choice: Perry Or Romney's 'Cult'

Originally published on Sat October 8, 2011 12:55 pm

Five presidential candidates appeared at the opening day of the Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C., on Friday, but the speech getting the most attention was one by a pastor from Dallas who introduced Texas Gov. Rick Perry.

Every year in Washington, social conservatives from across the country gather for the summit, an event sponsored by the Family Research Council. In presidential years, the summit is a must-stop for GOP candidates.

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NPR Story
8:00 am
Sat October 8, 2011

Romney Focuses On Security; Voters Weigh His Faith

While people were talking about the religion of former Gov. Mitt Romney at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, Romney was wrapping up a two-day swing through South Carolina. Romney finished fourth in this state's primary in 2008, and his Mormonism was one of the issues seen as holding him back. This time around, there's been less talk about religion and more about policy, but Romney still has a tough row to hoe in this early-voting state. NPR's Ari Shapiro explains why.

Animals
8:00 am
Sat October 8, 2011

A Bird Flies Into A Hurricane. Does It Fly Out?

Many migratory birds travel thousands of miles every year, over land and sea and, sometimes, through hurricanes. Host Scott Simon talks to Dr. Bryan Watts from the College of William and Mary, who used satellite transmitters to track shorebirds as they flew through Hurricane Irene.

Middle East
8:00 am
Sat October 8, 2011

Mubarak's Trial No Longer A Symbol Of Justice

Egyptians were glued to their television screens when the trial of ousted leader Hosni Mubarak began late this summer. The trial has lost much of its appeal since then, and not just because it's no longer televised. Merritt Kennedy reports from Cairo.

Economy
8:00 am
Sat October 8, 2011

Hiring's Up, So Will Obama Keep His Job?

New jobs numbers came out Friday, reporting employers added more than 100,000 workers to their payrolls. That's better than many forecasters were expecting, but not good enough for the 14 million Americans who are still out of work. NPR's Scott Horsley reports on what the numbers tell us about the economy and what they mean for President Obama.

Politics
8:00 am
Sat October 8, 2011

Canada-Gulf Pipeline Pits Jobs Against Environment

The State Department is considering whether to issue a permit for a controversial oil pipeline from Canada to the Gulf Coast. Environmentalists oppose the project, but defenders say jobs are at stake. NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

Columns
8:00 am
Sat October 8, 2011

Steve Jobs, Whose Imagination Invited Us To Play

In this week's essay, host Scott Simon reflects on the life of Apple co-founder, Steve Jobs who died this week.

Around the Nation
8:00 am
Sat October 8, 2011

Marathon Gets Tornado-Hit Town Back On Its Feet

Originally published on Sat October 8, 2011 12:09 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

In Joplin, Missouri, runners are gearing up for the city's marathon tomorrow. Some local runners say they have a goal to help them carry on, after they lost everything in last May's devastating tornado.

From member station KBIA, reporter Jacob Fenston joined a few runners training for the race.

JACOB FENSTON, BYLINE: Its 5:30 in morning, pitch-black out as a dozen members of the Joplin Road Runners head down Main Street. It's actually the first week the street lights are back on since the tornado struck four months ago.

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Author Interviews
8:00 am
Sat October 8, 2011

'Turquoise Palace' A True Political Murder Mystery

On Sept. 17, 1992, a group of Iranian and Kurdish opposition leaders were assassinated in a Greek restaurant in Berlin. Despite pressures to keep the investigation at the lowest possible level, a German prosecutor unraveled a tangle of threads that led to Iran's Supreme Leader himself. Host Scott Simon speaks with Roya Hakakian, author of the new book, Assassins of the Turquoise Palace.

The Impact of War
7:53 am
Sat October 8, 2011

Now Serving In Uniform, Teacher Seeks To Inspire

Darryl St. George was a high school teacher on Long Island before becoming a Navy corpsman. In June, he was serving in southern Afghanistan. He's back in the U.S. for the time being and has visited his former school.

David Gilkey NPR

Darryl St. George has served his country both in and out of uniform. He left his high school teaching job on Long Island in 2010 to become a U.S. Navy corpsman, a medic for the U.S. Marines.

"I loved teaching. It was a great job, but I felt like something was missing. I kind of — I felt compelled to serve," he told NPR's Tom Bowman in July.

At the time, he was at a dusty combat outpost in southern Afghanistan. St. George had one month left in his deployment to Afghanistan, and said that when he came home, he planned to visit the school where he had taught.

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Theater
5:00 am
Sat October 8, 2011

Frank Langella On Acting, Aging And Being Very Bad

'Man' Of Some Importance: Actor Frank Langella (left, with Adam Driver) anchors the Roundabout Theatre Company's Man and Boy, about a highflying financier whose empire hangs by a thread.

Joan Marcus

Nobody glowers like Frank Langella. The man who brought Richard Nixon to life in his Tony Award-winning turn in Frost/Nixon and who was a true lizard in Seascape is now playing Gregor Antonescu, an acclaimed international financier who was exposed as a flagrant and successful fraud.

He's starring in a revival of Terrence Rattigan's 1963 play Man and Boy, which has its opening night Oct. 9. The play centers on the sudden reunion of the father (Langella) and the son he'd thought was dead. (Actually, the son's just living in Greenwich Village.)

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Author Interviews
4:53 am
Sat October 8, 2011

The 'Blue Horse' That Inspired A Children's Book

Eric Carle Penguin Young Readers Group

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 3:44 pm

Even if you don't know the name Eric Carle, his work has probably made you smile. He's the author and illustrator of more than 70 children's books, including The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? His books brim with bold and unique collages, bursting with color and clever words.

Carle has a new children's book about an artist who — like the author — enjoys stepping out of the box. It's called The Artist Who Painted A Blue Horse.

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Africa
4:22 am
Sat October 8, 2011

Dalai Lama's Absence Looms Large At Tutu's Birthday

Children help retired Archbishop Desmond Tutu blow out candles on a cake during a celebration of his 80th birthday in Stellenbosch, South Africa, on Friday.

Rodger Bosch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 8, 2011 10:20 pm

In downtown Cape Town, worshippers gathered Friday for a morning Mass at St. George's Cathedral. During apartheid, the massive stone church was an epicenter of resistance against the South African government. On Friday, a service was held to honor the man who led that resistance, Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu.

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