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Business
4:00 am
Thu October 6, 2011

Business News

Originally published on Thu October 6, 2011 7:33 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the big loss for the tech world.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Steve Jobs died yesterday. The co-founder of Apple was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer seven years ago. From the time a young Steve Jobs introduced the Apple I, his products changed consumer behavior.

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Business
4:00 am
Thu October 6, 2011

The Last Word In Business

Lynn Neary has the Last Word in business.

Conflict In Libya
12:01 am
Thu October 6, 2011

Gadhafi May Be Hard To Find, But Not His Supporters

A revolutionary fighter watches over two suspected Gadhafi loyalists in Sirte, Libya, last month. By some estimates, up to 30 to 40 percent of Libyans are sympathetic to former dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

Manu Brabo AP

In Libya, anti-government fighters are facing fierce resistance in Moammar Gadhafi's hometown of Sirte. It's one of the last areas that has not fallen to rebel forces. But it's hardly the last bastion of support for the deposed leader.

On a busy afternoon in the market in the southern Tripoli neighborhood of Abu Salim, it doesn't take long for a man to approach a visiting reporter and say under his breath, "You know, we all support Gadhafi here."

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Politics
12:01 am
Thu October 6, 2011

Bipartisan Support For China Tariffs Ahead Of Vote

Originally published on Thu October 6, 2011 8:48 am

The debate on trade sanctions against China that has roiled the Senate all week comes to a head in a make-or-break vote Thursday. Earlier this week, 79 senators voted to take up the bill, which could slap punitive tariffs on imports from China, the largest U.S. trading partner.

The legislation has strong backing from Democrats and Republicans alike; they say it could boost American jobs by punishing China's efforts to keep its currency undervalued and its exports underpriced. Opponents warn that should the bill become law, it could touch off a devastating trade war.

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Election 2012
7:50 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Palin Says She Won't Run For President

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 9:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Sarah Palin says she will not run for the 2012 GOP nomination for president. The former vice presidential nominee made the announcement on the syndicated Mark Levin radio show. For more, I'm joined by NPR's Don Gonyea. And, Don, what reasons did Palin give?

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The Two-Way
7:49 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Tributes Pour Forth For Steve Jobs; Apple Co-Founder Was 56

A screengrab shows the Boing Boing website, restyled to resemble one of an early Mac operating system in honor of late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs.

NPR

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 10:07 pm

Tributes are pouring forth in honor of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, who died Wednesday at age 56. He is being remembered as a visionary who co-founded Apple, left the company, and then returned to build it into a global powerhouse.

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Remembrances
7:44 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Apple Visionary Steve Jobs Dies At 56

Steve Jobs holds up an iPhone at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco in June 2010.

Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 2:01 pm

Steve Jobs — the man who brought us the iPhone, the iPod and the iMac — has died. The co-founder of Apple was 56 years old. Jobs had been battling a rare form of pancreatic cancer for years.

"It boggles the mind to think of all the things that Steve Jobs did," says Silicon Valley venture capitalist Roger McNamee, who worked with Jobs.

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Shots - Health Blog
7:00 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Women Exposed To Hormone In Utero Face Lifelong Health Problems

A still from A Healthy Baby Girl, a 1996 documentary in which filmmaker Judith Helfand chronicles the health consequences of her own in utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES).

Courtesy of Women Make Movies

Originally published on Thu October 6, 2011 10:51 am

Back in the 1940s, '50s and '60s, doctors prescribed a hormone called diethylstilbestrol, or DES, to millions of pregnant women in the unfounded belief it would prevent miscarriages.

Smack in the middle of this period, the deformed thalidomide babies demonstrated the terrible things that can happen when drugs are casually prescribed during pregnancy.

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The Two-Way
6:33 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Sarah Palin Says She Will Not Run For President In 2012 Election

Former Alaska governor Sarah Palin says she will not seek the Republican nomination for the 2012 presidential election. Here, she speaks at a Tea Party Express rally in New Hampshire, Sept. 5, as part of the Reclaiming America bus tour.

Darren McCollester Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 7:16 pm

Former Alaska governor Sarah Palin will not be adding her name to the pool of candidates running for U.S. president in 2012, according to reports. In a statement provided to the Mark Levin radio show, Palin said, "I have decided that I will not be seeking the 2012 GOP nomination for president of the United States."

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It's All Politics
6:30 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Millionaire Surtax A 'Desperate' Act To Conservatives, 'Sensible' To Liberals

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid unveils his surtax proposal flanked by Sens. Richard Durbin (l) and Charles Schumer, Oct. 5, 2011.

Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 6:57 pm

Senate Democrats haven't exactly been moving as one to embrace President Obama's $447 billion jobs bill.

The disagreement in their ranks arises partly from how the president proposes to pay for his plan, an approach seen by some senators as potentially making their already difficult path to re-election even more so.

The president envisions increasing taxes on couples who, after deductions, have at least $250,000 in taxable income.

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The Two-Way
5:45 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Currying Danger: Restaurant's Spice Contest Puts Two In Hospital

The curry contest that put several participants in the hospital in Scotland likely used a relative of these 'Dorset Naga' chillies, one of the hottest varieties of chilli in the world.

Oli Scarff Getty Images

A Scottish restaurant's competition to see who could eat the spiciest curry — and raise money for charity in the process — has ended in painful trips to the emergency room for at least two participants.

The Kismot restaurant of Edinburgh, which serves Indian and Bangladeshi food, challenged competitors to eat its hottest curry. At least 20 people answered the bell. But problems became evident almost as soon as participants began eating the curry.

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Around the Nation
5:08 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

A Business Incubator Gives Funding And Jobs To Vets

Illumatek makes windshields that are engraved and lit with fiber optics so motorcycles are more visible on the road. Its founder worked with VETransfer, a nonprofit that connects veteran entrepreneurs with funding and business skills.

Courtesy of John Miller

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 5:08 am

As the U.S. winds down military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and troops come home, many are eager to start work in the civilian sector. But it's been tough: The federal government reports the unemployment rate for young veterans has hovered around 30 percent this year.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:56 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Penalties For 'Worst' Hospitals Could Hurt Minorities

Rating the best hospitals has become commonplace, with U.S. News & World Report, various research firms and lots of websites routinely issuing rankings.

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The Two-Way
4:18 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Occupy Wall Street Gets Union Backing; Approval Rating Tops Congress

Occupy Wall Street protesters join a labor union rally in New York's Foley Square on Wednesday.

Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Thu October 6, 2011 4:02 am

Occupy Wall Street is getting a shot in the arm, as some of America's largest unions have announced that they're now supporting the movement. The gain in momentum comes as off-shoots of the original Manhattan group plan marches and protests around the nation.

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National Security
4:09 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Gap Grows Between Military, Civilians On War

A new poll by the Pew Research Center shows a significant divergence on attitudes toward war and military service between members of the military and civilians.

David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 4:42 pm

As the U.S. marks the 10th anniversary of its involvement in the Afghan war this week, a Pew Research Center report shows some wide differences between the way military members and the general public view the fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Pew researchers talked to nearly 4,000 people, split almost evenly between military veterans and civilians. Paul Taylor, the editor of the study, said he wanted to explore this unique moment in American history.

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The Salt
4:08 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Undercover School Lunch Blogger 'Mrs. Q' Reveals Herself

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 4:13 pm

School lunch is a topic of endless fascination here at The Salt and, really, wherever parents of school age children compare notes. If we don't have time to pack their lunch, what exactly are the 32 million kids, including ours, eating?

Well, the secret of what's on the lunch tray has been out for some time in Chicago Public Schools, thanks to a blog called Fed Up With Lunch, and now the whole world knows who's been behind it.

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Monkey See
4:06 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Long Literary Shadows On Nobel Shortlist

Adonis, born Ali Ahmad Said Esber, is one of the contenders for the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Mario Vedder AP

Originally published on Thu October 6, 2011 5:05 pm

They are the Nobel literature bridesmaids. Every year, they appear on Ladbrokes' betting site alongside their odds of winning. Les Murray: 16/1. Cees Nooteboom: 33/1. Claudio Magris: 40/1.

Perennial names probably more familiar to American readers include Haruki Murakami (7/1), Chinua Achebe and Amos Oz. The latter two aren't even ranked by Ladbrokes this time around. If recent history is any indicator, that means they've got a decent shot of winning. The Ladbrokes lads, after all, did not bother to place odds for such recent winners as Herta Muller or Elfriede Jelinek.

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The Two-Way
3:45 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Ron Paul Asks: Will The Government Assassinate Journalists Next?

Republican presidential candidate Rep. Ron Paul of Texas at the National Press Club in Washington today.

Patrick Smith Getty Images

Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) was quick last Friday to condemn the killing of American-born al-Qaida cleric Anwar al-Awlaki by a U.S. drone strike in Yemen.

"If the American people accept this blindly and casually that we now have an accepted practice of the president assassinating people who he thinks are bad guys, I think it's sad," Paul said.

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Monkey See
3:26 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Do Rising Costs Have 'The Simpsons' On The Ropes?

The Simpsons is confronted with pressures that may require the voice cast to accept large pay cuts or face the possibility that the show won't continue at all.

FOX

The future of the The Simpsons hangs in the balance as negotiations continue between 20th Century Fox Television, which makes the animated series, and the actors who supply the characters voices. How does a TV classic that's been on the air a record 23 seasons find itself at death's door?

Well, the cartoon Simpsons aren't rich, but the real people who bring them to life sure are. Six main actors are responsible for everyone from Homer to Lisa to bartender Moe, and you won't believe how much each makes to do voices for these characters. Try $8 million a season.

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It's All Politics
3:19 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Rubio's Veep Prospects Could Be Fueling Boycott Of GOP Debate

A dispute involving Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and the nation's largest Spanish-language TV network, Univision, has spilled over into the presidential primary. At least five Republican presidential candidates say they will not take part in a debate planned by Univision in January, before the Florida primary.

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The Two-Way
3:14 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Senate Democrats Pitch 5 Percent Surtax On Millionaires

Left to right: Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) at a news conference on Capitol Hill today.

Alex Wong Getty Images

Making the case that some of the tax increases that would partly pay for President Obama's $447 billion jobs bill are aimed at Americans who are not that rich, the Senate's Democratic leaders are proposing a 5 percent tax on annual incomes above $1 million instead.

According to The Associated Press:

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Research News
3:13 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Nobel-Winning Chemist Fought Hard For Acceptance

Daniel Schectman, left, discusses the quasicrystal's structure with collaborators in 1985, just months after shaking the foundations of materials science. Schectman was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize for chemistry.

H. Mark Helfer NIST

If you or your mate shaved this morning with one of those thin-foil electric shavers, that face probably brushed up against a strange form of matter called a quasicrystal. Norelco is unlikely to get a Nobel Prize for that invention, but the man who discovered quasicrystals, Daniel Shechtman, will get this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry. And it didn't come easy.

Crystals, like diamonds and quartz, hold their sparkly allure because of the way the atoms inside those rocks line up so neatly.

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The Salt
3:06 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

East Coast Pumpkin Shortage Won't Dent The Canned Kind

Melissa Forsyth NPR

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 9:45 pm

With Halloween rapidly approaching, you've probably heard about the shortage of pumpkins along the East Coast caused by the flooding rains of Hurricane Irene.

But while you may have troubling finding just the right shape or the right price for your jack o'lantern this year, there's good news for those looking ahead to the pies and cakes of Thanksgiving and Christmas.

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Research News
3:06 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

Researchers Advance Cloning Of Human Embryos

Nature

Researchers in New York are reporting an advance in creating cloned human embryos. The embryos would not be used for reproduction, but rather the creation of embryonic stem cells. Many scientists believe that human embryonic stem cells made this way could revolutionize medicine.

The advantage of stem cells made this way is that they could be personalized to an individual.

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Election 2012
2:45 pm
Wed October 5, 2011

In Texas, Perry Has Little Say In 'Ultimate Justice'

In 2005, death penalty opponents protest the impending execution of condemned inmate Frances Newton in Huntsville, Texas. Newton was convicted of killing her husband and two children in their Houston apartment. She was put to death by lethal injection on Sept. 14, 2005.

David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Thu October 6, 2011 1:54 pm

As the longest-serving governor of Texas, Rick Perry has overseen the application of the death penalty more than any other U.S. governor — 236 executions, and counting.

While Perry is unquestionably a steadfast supporter of capital punishment, his overall record on criminal justice is more complicated than that.

'The Train Runs On Its Own'

Inside the Texas Prison Museum, off Interstate 45 in the city of Huntsville, sits a stout oak chair, its varnish dull with age, fitted with thick leather straps.

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