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4:06 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Deal In Detroit Could Signal Cuts To Pensions Elsewhere

Retirees Mike Shane (left) and William Davis protest near the federal courthouse in Detroit on July 3. Workers and retirees approved pension cuts in Detroit's bankruptcy by a landslide, the city reported Monday.
Paul Sancya AP

It used to be that if you were a public employee, you knew your pension benefits could not be touched.

That's no longer the case.

Pensions have been under political attack in recent years, with some politicians arguing they can't afford to fund generous retirements at the same time they're cutting services. Numerous states and cities have trimmed the type of pension plans they're offering employees — mostly new employees.

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Goats and Soda
3:31 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Don't Pop That Bubble Wrap! Scientists Turn Trash Into Test Tubes

Clear and clean, bubble wrap is well-suited to serve as an array of tiny test tubes. Here a dye solution is injected into the bubbles to measure the hemoglobin concentration in blood.
American Chemical Society

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 5:47 pm

Hate to burst your bubble, glass lab gear. But plastic bubble wrap also works pretty well at running science experiments.

Scientists at Harvard University have figured out a way to use these petite pouches as an inexpensive alternate to glass test tubes and culture dishes. They even ran glucose tests on artificial urine and anemia tests on blood, all with the samples sitting inside bubble wrap.

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Shots - Health News
3:19 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

As High School Lacrosse Surges In Popularity, So Does Injury Focus

Walt Whitman High School's Caroline Schweitzer runs through a host of Severna Park High School defenders during a semifinal game in Maryland's Class 4A/3A lacrosse tournament in May.
Toni L. Sandys The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:02 pm

Sometimes called the fastest game on two feet, lacrosse is also one of the fastest-growing sports in the U.S.

Between 2008 and 2012, kids' participation in lacrosse climbed 158 percent to a little more than three-quarters of a million, according to a survey conducted by the Sports & Fitness Industry Association/Physical Activity Council. At the same time participation in baseball, basketball, football and soccer has either stagnated or declined.

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Goats and Soda
3:17 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Rumor Patrol: No, A Snake In A Bag Did Not Cause Ebola

Eerie protective suits and shiny body bags have fueled rumors about the origins of Ebola. Here, a burial team removes the body of a person suspected to have died from the virus in the village of Pendembu, Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:17 pm

"A lady had a snake in a bag. When somebody opened the bag, that made the lady die."

That's the beginning of a story that Temba Morris often hears about the origins of Ebola. Morris runs a government health clinic in a remote village near Sierra Leone's border with Guinea. According to the story, somebody else then looked inside the bag.

"And the one who opened the bag also died," is what Morris hears next. The snake escaped into the Sierra Leone bush.

So there you have it: Ebola is an evil snake that will kill you if you look at it.

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The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Montana Judge Is Publicly Censured Over 30-Day Sentence For Rape

Montana District Judge G. Todd Baugh was publicly censured by the state Supreme Court on Tuesday. The judge apologized for remarks he made about a rape victim last year.
Matt Brown AP

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:00 pm

Less than a year after his lenient jail sentence for an admitted rapist stirred outrage, a Montana judge was publicly reprimanded today. In giving a former high school teacher only a 30-day jail sentence, District Judge G. Todd Baugh said the man's victim, a student, seemed older than her age, 14.

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Shots - Health News
2:05 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

How A Tiny Fly's Ears Could Help You Hear Better

If you were a cricket, this little fly would make you very nervous.
Courtesy of Louisiana State Arthropod Museum

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 8:32 am

Ormia ochracea is not a very likeable creature, even by fly standards.

This parasitic fly likes to leave its larvae on the backs of crickets. The larvae burrow inside the cricket and then proceed to eat the cricket alive.

But humans who have struggled with hearing loss might soon be thankful for at least one small part of this fly — its ears.

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Krulwich Wonders...
1:55 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

What's Better Than A Total Eclipse Of The Sun? Check This

NASA/JPL-Caltech

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 2:54 pm

Any eclipse is worth seeing. A total eclipse — where the moon completely blots out the sun, where day turns to night, where solar flares ring the moon's shadow like a crown of flame — that's the eclipse everybody wants to see, the alpha eclipse that eclipses all the other eclipses. Everybody knows this (me included), until I saw this ...

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Health Care
1:13 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Federal Court Throws Out Health Care Subsidies In 36 States

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:38 pm

Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News explains a federal appeals court ruling Tuesday that overturns subsidies provided to low- and middle-income people in states that use the federal health exchanges.

The Two-Way
12:54 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

FAA Prohibits U.S. Airlines From Flying To Tel Aviv

A woman passes by a departure board at Philadelphia International Airport showing that US Airways Flight 796 to Tel Aviv has been canceled Tuesday.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 9:00 pm

The Federal Aviation Administration has issued a 24-hour ban on flights to and from the Tel Aviv airport.

"The notice was issued in response to a rocket strike which landed approximately one mile from Ben Gurion International Airport on the morning of July 22, 2014," the FAA said in a statement.

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Shots - Health News
12:31 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Appeals Court Strikes Down Subsidies In Federal Health Exchange

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:37 pm

A three-judge panel at the U.S. Appeals Court for the D.C. Circuit threw the fate of an important part of the Affordable Care Act into doubt Tuesday.

In a 2-1 decision, the court ruled that the Internal Revenue Service lacked the authority to allow subsidies to be provided in exchanges not run by the states. The ruling could put at immediate risk the millions of people who bought insurance in the 36 states where these online insurance marketplaces are run by the federal government.

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Technology
12:07 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Tweeting From A Conflict Zone: Does It Help Or Hurt News Reporting?

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 2:03 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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News
12:07 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

For Pregnant Women, New Guidelines Aim To Reduce Workplace Discrimination

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 2:03 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
10:49 am
Tue July 22, 2014

U.S. Appeals Courts Issue Conflicting Decisions On Obamacare Subsidies

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 2:03 pm

A U.S. appeals court on Tuesday dealt a significant blow to the Affordable Care Act, when it threw out an IRS regulation that governs subsidies. But before the ink dried on that decision, another three-judge panel hearing a similar case issued a decision that was completely opposite.

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The Two-Way
10:22 am
Tue July 22, 2014

U.K. Orders New Inquiry Into Ex-KGB Spy Litvinenko's Death

Marina Litvinenko, the widow of former Russian intelligence officer Alexander Litvinenko, says she is "relieved and delighted" with the U.K. government's decision to open a public inquiry into the former KGB agent's death in 2006 by radiation poisoning.
Matt Dunham AP

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:12 pm

Britain has ordered a public inquiry into the death in 2006 of former KGB spy Alexander Litvinenko by radiation poisoning.

In a statement to Parliament today, Home Secretary Theresa May said the independent Home Office inquiry will be headed by Robert Owen, a senior judge who is the coroner in the inquest into Litvinenko's death. She said the inquiry would, among other things, identify "where responsibility for the death lies."

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Goats and Soda
10:03 am
Tue July 22, 2014

The Immigrant Kids Have Health Issues — But Not The Ones You'd Think

Two young girls, part of the wave of unaccompanied children who've illegally entered the U.S., watch a soccer match at the Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Arizona.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 2:43 pm

Close to 60,000 children have crossed illegally into the U.S. since last October. They've sparked a crisis. But is it a humanitarian crisis or a public health one?

The children carry "swine flu, dengue fever, Ebola virus, and tuberculosis," and can spread the diseases to the U.S., wrote Rep. Phil Gingrey, R-Ga., a retired obstetrician-gynecologist, in a July 7 letter to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Shots - Health News
9:43 am
Tue July 22, 2014

States Experiment With Health Savings Accounts For Medicaid

Topp Yimgrimm/iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 10:19 am

If all goes according to plan, next year many Arkansas Medicaid beneficiaries will be required to make monthly contributions to so-called Health Independence Accounts. Those who don't may have to pay more of the cost of their medical services, and in some cases may be refused services.

Supporters say it will help nudge Medicaid beneficiaries toward becoming more cost-conscious health care consumers. Patient advocates are skeptical, pointing to studies showing that such financial "skin-in-the-game" requirements discourage low-income people from getting care that they need.

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The Two-Way
9:27 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Detroit Pensioners Approve City's Bankruptcy Plan

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 10:19 am

Detroit moved one step closer toward bankruptcy after crossing a major hurdle on Monday.

With a large margin, retired police and firefighters approved modest cuts in their pensions that are part of the city's bankruptcy plans.

The Detroit News reports:

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Gaza Conflict Day 15: Here's What You Need To Know

A relative bursts into tears in front of the bodies of seven members of the Kelani family, killed overnight by an Israeli strike in Gaza City.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:33 pm

As Israel's offensive against Hamas entered its 15th day, Secretary of State John Kerry was in Cairo pressing for a truce modeled after the 2012 cease-fire.

Still, the violence continued unabated with the death toll on both sides rising: More than 500 Palestinians and 25 Israeli soldiers and two Israeli civilians have been killed.

With that here's what you need to know:

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Tue July 22, 2014

In This School, Class Is A Workshop And Experiments Are Mandatory

Haziz Self says that he's learned "what it means to live up to your principles."
Kimberly Paynter WHYY

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:33 pm

Imagine a school where classes are organized not by subject but by project — a school created not by administrators, but by teachers fed up with the status quo. A school where kids from a city's toughest neighborhoods are given the opportunity to experiment and the freedom to fail.

In West Philadelphia, that school is a reality. It's called The Workshop School.

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The Two-Way
7:57 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Jakarta Gov. Widodo Wins Indonesian Presidency, Tally Shows

Indonesian presidential candidate Joko Widodo talks to the media during his visit at a reservoir development project in Jakarta on Tuesday.
Dita Alangkara AP

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 2:13 pm

Jakarta Gov. Joko Widodo won 53 percent of the vote in Indonesia's presidential election, according to a final tally released Tuesday by the country's Election Commission.

Widodo, a former furniture maker who entered national politics only two years ago, received 70,997,859 votes of the nearly 133 million valid ballots cast; his rival former Gen. Prabowo Subianto, received 46.85 percent of the votes. Turnout was high — nearly 71 percent.

The figures were reported by The Associated Press.

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The Two-Way
6:56 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Train Carrying MH17 Victims' Remains Arrives In Government-Controlled City

Police officers secure a refrigerated train loaded with bodies of the passengers of Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 as it arrives in a Kharkiv factory on Tuesday.
Olga Ivashchenko AP

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 9:03 am

A refrigerated train carrying the remains of the people who died aboard the downed Malaysia Airlines plane arrived in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Tuesday. That's a city controlled by the central government in Kiev and 17 hours away from the chaos of Hrabove, the eastern city controlled by pro-Russian separatists, where the debris and remains were scattered.

The New York Times sets the scene:

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Strange News
6:27 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Sheriff Puts Inmates Back In Stripes As Orange Jumpsuits Gain Fame

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A sheriff in Michigan is concerned that the popular series "Orange Is The New Black" has turned orange prison jumpsuits into a fashion statement, like it's cool to be in jail. So concerned, he's requiring inmates to wear old-fashioned black-and-white-striped jumpsuits in place of the orange ones. Sheriff Will Federspiel told The Saginaw News that a lot of inmates don't like the new jumpsuits. His response - too bad, don't come to jail. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Sports
5:25 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Woman Will Officiate Big 12 Football Game For The First Time

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with congratulations to Catherine Conti. Cat Conti will be the first woman to officiate a football game in the Big 12 Conference. She'll be part of the crew when Kansas plays Southeast Missouri State. The officiating supervisor says she got that job because she's, quote, "darned good." Kansas coach Charlie Weis says because of Ms. Conti, he will try not to swear as much.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Actually, Coach Weis, equality means curse away.

Space
4:45 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Rosetta Spacecraft Readies For Rendezvous With Comet

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:45 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Telecommuting Didn't Work Out For One Transplanted Worker

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This summer, we're also focusing on the high rate of youth unemployment and hearing what some out-of-work younger adults are doing to make ends meet. Christina Gastlelum is 32. She recently moved to Maine from New York City. She tried to keep doing her job as vice president of a nonprofit remotely which did not work out.

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