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Goats and Soda
3:41 am
Wed October 15, 2014

Should You Stock Up On Chocolate Bars Because Of Ebola?

Farmer Issiaka Ouedraogo lays cocoa beans out to dry on reed mats, on a farm outside the village of Fangolo, Ivory Coast.
Rebecca Blackwell AP

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 10:16 am

Jack Scoville was buying himself a chocolate bar a few weeks ago — Hershey's, milk — at a corner store in Chicago. And he noticed the price was just a bit higher than he's used to paying: 5 or 10 cents more. His first thought was not to blame a greedy store owner or the executives in Hershey, Pa.

He blamed Ebola.

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U.S.
3:40 am
Wed October 15, 2014

'Culture Of Violence' Pervades Rikers' Juvenile Facilities

An inmate at Rikers Island juvenile detention facility carries a plastic fork behind his back as he walks with other inmates. A recent report found that juvenile detainees are subjected to routine violence, both by other inmates and by correction officers.
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 4:19 pm

For most of New York, Rikers Island is out of sight and out of mind. It's in the middle of the East River between Queens and the Bronx. There's only one unmarked bridge that leads on and off. But a recent report on violence by correction officers, or COs, was no surprise to those who've spent time there.

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Sweetness And Light
3:39 am
Wed October 15, 2014

Nonprofit NFL Seeks Super Bowl Volunteers, Again

Super Bowl volunteer Ben Schreiber distributes fan guides for Super Bowl XLVI festivities in 2012.
Chad Ryan CSM/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 2:18 pm

That familiar old preface we so often hear — usually from long-winded people — is: "To make a long story short." I've noticed lately that that expression has become more common, but, to make a long story short, it's been shortened to just "long story short." I'll even bet it's gotten initialed in the text universe to LSS.

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The Two-Way
12:33 am
Wed October 15, 2014

Australian Novelist Richard Flanagan Awarded Booker Prize

Australian author Richard Flanagan, 2014's Man Booker Prize winner, holds his book The Narrow Road to the Deep North at the Royal Festival Hall in London on Monday.
Alastair Grant AP

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 10:26 am

On Tuesday in London, the judging panel for Britain's 2014 Man Booker Prize for literature announced this year's winner: The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Australian Richard Flanagan.

The novel, Flanagan's sixth, tells the story of POWs in World War II who were forced by their captors to work on the Thailand-Burma Railway, also known as the "Death Railway" for the more than 100,000 who died in the process of building it.

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The Two-Way
12:28 am
Wed October 15, 2014

Supreme Court Blocks Abortion Rules That Closed Most Texas Clinics

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 12:39 pm

The Supreme Court has placed a hold on a 2013 Texas law that was threatening to close most of the state's clinics that perform abortions.

NPR's Nina Totenberg reports that the law was already responsible for the closing of nearly 40 clinics across Texas. Nina filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
7:55 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

IN PICTURES: A Chaotic, Violent Day In Hong Kong, As Police Clear Streets

Pro-democracy protesters shout at police forces outside the central government offices in Hong Kong.
Philippe Lopez AFP/Getty Images

Over the past day, police in Hong Kong have been trying to clear the streets blocked by demonstrators engaged in acts civil disobedience.

As NPR's Frank Langfitt described it, police played a game of whack-a-mole with protesters. They cleared streets only to have protesters erect roadblocks elsewhere.

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Shots - Health News
6:33 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Embryonic Stem Cells Restore Vision In Preliminary Human Test

Isabella Beukes, of Santa Rosa, Calif., has been legally blind for more than 40 years. An experimental treatment derived from embryonic stem cells seems to have enabled her now to see not just color but also some shapes.
Tim Hussin for NPR

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 11:39 am

Scientists are reporting the first strong evidence that human embryonic stem cells may be helping patients.

The cells appear to have improved the vision in more than half of the 18 patients who had become legally blind because of two progressive, currently incurable eye diseases.

The researchers stress that the findings must be considered preliminary because the number of patients treated was relatively small and they have only been followed for an average of less than two years.

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Goats and Soda
6:30 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Ebola Volunteers Are Needed — But Signing On Isn't Easy

A licensed clinician is decontaminated before disrobing at the end of a simulated training session by CDC in Anniston, Ala. Training can take a several weeks, making some employers reluctant to encourage their medical workers to volunteer in the Ebola outbreak.
Brynn Anderson AP

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 7:28 pm

As soon as the Ebola outbreak started to spiral out of control in West Africa, Kwan Kew Lai felt obligated to help.

She's a physician who specializes in infectious disease. And for the last decade, she's dedicated herself to volunteering for international health emergencies. She works part-time at one of Harvard's teaching hospital just to have that flexibility.

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All Tech Considered
6:30 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Microsoft Windows Flaw Let Russian Hackers Spy On NATO, Report Says

Microsoft says it's patching a Windows security flaw cited in a report on alleged spying by Russian hackers.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 6:41 pm

A group of hackers, allegedly from Russia, found a fundamental flaw in Microsoft Windows and exploited it to spy on Western governments, NATO, European energy companies and an academic organization in the United States.

That's according to new research from iSight Partners, a Dallas-based cybersecurity firm.

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The Two-Way
6:29 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Benghazi Suspect, Ahmed Abu Khattala, Is Indicted On 17 New Charges

This undated image obtained from Facebook shows Ahmed Abu Khattala, an alleged leader of the deadly 2012 attacks on Americans in Benghazi, Libya.
Uncredited AP

Ahmed Abu Khattala, the suspected leader of the 2012 attack against the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, has been indicted on 17 new charges by a federal grand jury in Washington, D.C.

If you remember, Khattala was captured by special forces in Libya back in June. He appeared in court later that month and pleaded not guilty to a single count of conspiring to provide material support and resources to terrorists.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
6:11 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Debate: Does Mass Phone Data Collection Violate The 4th Amendment?

John Yoo, a former lawyer with the U.S. Department of Justice, argues that the NSA's phone records surveillance program is constitutional.
Jeff Fusco Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 11:25 am

The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees that "the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated."

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The Two-Way
5:20 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

At 113, Woman Lies About Her Age So She Can Join Facebook

Facebook's log-in page currently doesn't allow a date earlier than Jan. 1, 1905, to be selected.
Facebook

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 1:21 pm

Since her birth in 1900, Anna Stoehr has seen dramatic shifts in technology. But when the Minnesota woman tried recently to create a Facebook account, she hit a snag. The service's software couldn't handle her advanced age of 113 years old. So she fudged it a bit, and said she was 99.

To put Stoehr's age in context, we'll remind you: She was born three years before the Wright brothers conducted their historic first flight of an airplane in North Carolina.

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Shots - Health News
5:11 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

California Ballot Measure Pits Doctors Against Lawyers

Alana and Troy Pack died in 2003 when a woman abusing pain pills hit the children with her car. The accident has led to a ballot measure that, among other things, would put new constraints on physicians.
Courtesy of the Pack family

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 6:41 pm

Troy and Alana Pack had spent the day at their neighborhood Halloween party in Danville, a suburb of San Francisco. Ten-year-old Troy went as a baseball player, and 7-year-old Alana was a good witch. In the afternoon, they changed out of their costumes and set out for a walk with their mother. Destination: Baskin-Robbins.

"Alana, she liked anything with chocolate," says their father, Bob Pack. "Troy, for sure, bubble gum ice cream, because he liked counting the bubble gums that he would get."

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Politics
4:52 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Pizza Man Delivers Third-Party Option

North Carolina Libertarian Senate candidate Sean Haugh (center), Sen. Kay Hagan and Republican candidate Thom Tillis attend a debate on Oct. 9. Haugh's tie features a cartoon cat. He says his mom gave it to him.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 6:15 pm

He delivers pizza by night and runs for U.S. Senate by day. Sean Haugh, the Libertarian running for Senate in North Carolina, is among a dozen independent and third-party candidates nationwide who could shake up tight races for Senate and governor.

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Goats and Soda
4:42 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Live Airport Tweets: An NPR Producer's Irregular Ebola Screenings

The sign NPR producer Rebecca Hersher saw as she left Liberia to return to the United States.
Rebecca Hersher For NPR

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 10:33 am

NPR producer Rebecca Hersher has reported on Ebola from Liberia for the past two weeks. She just returned to the U.S. via Brussels and into Washington Dulles International Airport — the same route flown by Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian national who went on to Dallas, where he was diagnosed with the virus and later died. As Hersher's tweets reveal, she was screened. Sort of.

The Two-Way
4:41 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

CDC Says It's Monitoring 77 People Who Had Contact With Ebola Patients

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 5:13 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it is monitoring 77 people who had contact with patients diagnosed with Ebola.

Seventy-six of those, CDC Director Tom Frieden said in a press conference, were health care workers who cared for Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States.

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The Salt
4:35 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

What's Really In A Big Mac? McDonald's Says It's Ready To Tell All

McDonald's still won't reveal the recipe for its secret sauce, but it will show you how that Big Mac patty gets made.
Keith Srakocic AP

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 10:59 am

Did you hear the one about the McDonald's hamburger that still hadn't decomposed after 14 years?

And "pink slime" — how much goes into McDonald's beef?

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Shots - Health News
4:22 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Nurses Want To Know How Safe Is Safe Enough With Ebola

Nurses were worried about Ebola long before nurse Nina Pham became the first person to become infected with the deadly virus in the United States.Now they're worried and mad. And they've got lots of questions about how to care for future Ebola patients safely.

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Goats and Soda
4:03 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Back On Its Feet, A Liberian Hospital Aims To Keep Ebola Out

Dr. Wvennie MacDonald, the administrator of the JFK Memorial Hospital, has helped put new procedures in place to keep Ebola out, including a triage station to identify possible Ebola patients at the front gate.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 7:13 pm

John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital is the largest public hospital in Liberia. It has a trauma unit, a maternity ward and an outpatient clinic that serves hundreds a day.

But there's one illness that the facility won't treat: Ebola. JFK is not equipped to treat or contain it if it gets inside their wards. A new triage unit in the driveway detects patients with the virus and sends them to a dedicated Ebola center.

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The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Survey: Latin America Ranks Last In Respect For Women

Demonstrators call for more protection for women in Colombia last spring. Only 20 percent of respondents in the country said they feel women are respected there. One protester holds a sign reading "Woman, neither submissive, nor devout. I want you free, pretty and crazy."
Raul Arboleda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 5:09 pm

For the second consecutive year, a wide survey found people in Latin America are the least likely to say they live in countries where women are treated with respect and dignity, ranking below the Middle East and North Africa.

The Gallup survey found a wide range of opinions within Latin America: while 63 percent of respondents in Ecuador said women get respect, only 20 percent said the same in Peru and Colombia.

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Shots - Health News
2:05 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Can Changing How You Sound Help You Find Your Voice?

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 2:05 pm

Just having a feminine voice means you're probably not as capable at your job.

At least, studies suggest, that's what many people in the United States think. There's a gender bias in how Americans perceive feminine voices: as insecure, less competent and less trustworthy.

This can be a problem — especially for women jockeying for power in male-dominated fields, like law.

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NPR Ed
2:03 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Identifying The Worst Colleges In America

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 3:22 pm

For years,Washington Monthly has been rating and ranking the nation's colleges.

But for its 2014 edition, the magazine has done something new. It has put out a list of what it says are the nation's worst colleges. That is, schools with high tuition, low graduation rates and high student debt rates.

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All Tech Considered
1:34 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Snapchat And Dropbox Breaches Are Really Third-Party-App Breaches

Snapchat's logo.
Carl Raether Flickr

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 5:33 pm

What can get lost in a flurry of news about Dropbox and Snapchat getting hacked is that the companies themselves deny they were hacked at all.

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The Two-Way
12:52 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Secret U.S. Space Plane To Land After 22 Months In Orbit

This photo released by Vandenberg Air Force Base on Monday shows the X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle, the Air Force's unmanned, reusable space plane, after it landed at Vandenberg from a previous orbital mission.
Paul Pinner AP

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 8:59 pm

This much we know: It's not a bird and it's not exactly a plane.

Beyond that, the U.S. Air Force holds all the answers. The mission of the unmanned X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle, which is scheduled to touch down at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California Tuesday after 22 months in orbit, has been described only vaguely as "to gather more test data."

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The Salt
12:18 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Bike Like A Pro Athlete, Eat Like A Pig

This serving of Texas barbecue brisket, sausage and beans was a mere snack on our epic movable feast.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 10:59 am

Last month, a friend and I rode bicycles 738 miles up the spine of Texas from the Rio Grande to the Red River, dodging oilfield trucks and yipping Chihuahua dogs.

All that pedaling had us burning about 5,000 to 5,500 calories every day. And so the 10-day journey — eight days of it riding into a headwind — became a movable feast.

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