News From NPR

Pages

The Two-Way
3:46 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

In Sandy's Wake, New Yorkers Don't Sweat Small Stuff

People wait to charge cellphones and laptops Thursday at a generator set up in the West Village. Superstorm Sandy left large parts of New York City without power.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 4:05 pm

NPR's Margot Adler is covering the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy in New York.

I walked out of my apartment at 5 this morning in a part of Manhattan -– the Upper West Side — that never lost power. Still, I skirted around downed trees on my way to the subway. Across the street, a car was crushed by a tree. Almost no one was on the street.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:44 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Researchers Say Drug Subsidies Led To Overtreatment Of Malaria In Africa

Blood samples dry during malaria screening. Public health workers call for more malaria testing in Africa to stop costly drugs from being handed out to kids with pneumonia.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 1:23 pm

There's a hot debate in global health right now. And the stakes are high.

This month the Global Fund will vote to continue or scrap a $225 million project that subsidizes the cost of the most effective malaria drugs in seven African countries.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:41 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Mayor Bloomberg Endorses Obama, Citing Climate Change, Gay Marriage

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks to members of the media Oct. 28 in New York City.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

The independent mayor of New York City, Michael Bloomberg, has just endorsed President Barack Obama for president of United States.

Bloomberg opened his editorial in Bloomberg View by saying his decision was affected by the effect Superstorm Sandy had on New York City. The country, he said, needs a leader who will tackle these issues.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:19 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

University Of Alabama Names First Woman President

Judy Bonner, the University of Alabama's new president, when the school's championship football team visted the White House in April.
Mike Theiler UPI /Landov

For the first time in the school's 181-year history, the University of Alabama has named a woman to be its permanent president.

Read more
The Salt
3:09 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Sandy's Damage Under The Sea, Through The Eyes Of Oyster Farmers

What they pull up is discouraging. Normally, 30 seconds under water would bring up a cage full of mostly healthy oysters. This time, Jimmy Bloom pulls up a cage that is barely one-third full. And it's haul is a mix of broken, chipped, meatless oysters.
Jeff Cohen for NPR

Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy wrapped up a post Hurricane Sandy news briefing earlier this week by talking about sewage discharges into Long Island Sound. "Suffice to say in the immediate time being, no one should eat the clams or oysters," he said.

That's right. Because of water quality issues, the state put a temporary stop to oyster farming, but that's usually a short-term thing and it happens fairly regularly after a big storm.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:36 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

If Presidential Election Held Today, Clint Would Beat Oprah

A life-sized cardboard cutout of actor, director and politician Clint Eastwood stands next to an empty chair cutout north of Los Angeles, California. Eastwood's 12-minute conversation with an empty chair representing President Obama sparked much attention at the 2012 Republican National Convention.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 3:12 pm

File this under "I didn't really think there was anything else I could learn about or care about swing state voters, and then came this."

Swing state voters by 42-38 percent would prefer a President Clint Eastwood over a President Oprah Winfrey.

Republican swing state voters would prefer President Stephen Colbert over President Jon Stewart by a 3-to-1 margin. Flip that for swing state Democrats.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:31 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Obama Returns To The Post-Sandy Campaign Trail

President Obama campaigns Thursday in Green Bay, Wis.
Tom Lynn AP

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 2:49 pm

Just five days before Election Day, President Obama returned to the campaign trail after spending several days preoccupied with overseeing the federal response to the devastation in the Northeast in the wake of Superstorm Sandy.

Obama began his campaign re-emergence Thursday with a rally in Green Bay, Wis., a state where his once-substantial lead in polls over Republican Mitt Romney has narrowed to only a few points in a majority of the polls.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:28 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Pay Phones Are Suddenly Important Again Because Of Sandy

A woman uses a pay phone in the Lower East Village in Manhattan on Wednesday.
Carlo Allegri Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 2:24 pm

"After Sandy, Wired New Yorkers Get Reconnected With Pay Phones: Coin-Eating Retro Devices Baffle Some, Frustrate Many; Moment Merits a Tweet."

That Wall Street Journal story today, about folks in lower Manhattan who have been forced by the power outages and damages in the wake of Superstorm Sandy to seek out an old-fashioned way to make a call, has struck a chord.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:22 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Bloomberg Businessweek's Cover: 'It's Global Warming, Stupid'

Bloomberg Businessweek's latest cover.
Bloomberg

Climate change is one of those important topics that has remained under the radar this election cycle.

Without a doubt, Superstorm Sandy has brought it back to the spotlight. That's evident when New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo linked Sandy to global warming.

Read more
Election 2012
12:37 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Why The White House Glass Ceiling Remains Solid

The presidency has remained a male-only office throughout American history. Despite changing demographics and huge gains by women in other walks of life, some experts still don't see a female president on the horizon.
Joshua Roberts Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 2:50 pm

Will the United States ever elect a woman president?

When President Obama — or Mitt Romney — leaves the Oval Office, there will be a handful of highly touted female candidates for consideration as top-of-the-ticket nominees for both major parties.

On the Republican side, the list includes Sen. Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire and Govs. Susana Martinez of New Mexico, Nikki Haley of South Carolina and maybe even Sarah Palin of Alaska.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Former Penn State President Graham Spanier Charged In Sex Abuse Scandal

Former Penn State University president Graham Spanier speaks during a news conference.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 12:40 pm

Pennsylvania Attorney General Linda Kelly just announced that former Penn State President Graham Spanier has been charged in connection with the child sex abuse scandal that has rocked the university.

According to Onward State, an online news outlet covering Penn State, Spanier is facing eight charges ranging from perjury to endangering welfare of children to conspiracy.

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:55 am
Thu November 1, 2012

How An Antibody Found In Monkeys Could Help Make An Ebola Vaccine

A microbiologist runs an experiment to count hemorrhagic fever viruses at the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.
Scott Smith CDC

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 2:34 pm

Just the word Ebola can send shivers down the spine.

And no wonder.

Ebola is one of the deadliest viruses around, and there aren't any approved treatments or vaccines for it.

Scientists have been experimenting with an Ebola vaccine in animals for the past few years, but they've been stymied. There's no easy way to test its effectiveness in people.

Read more
Election 2012
11:45 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Sandy Raises Concerns For Nation's Infrastructure

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 12:03 pm

The cleanup effort is underway after superstorm Sandy, and questions are cropping up about the country's aging infrastructure. Henry Gomez reports for The Plain Dealer in Cleveland. He put his questions to President Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney well before the storm hit. He speaks with host Michel Martin, as part of NPR's "Solve This" series.

Election 2012
11:45 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Voter Fraud Billboards Stir Controversy

Billboards declaring "Voter Fraud is a Felony" were recently taken down in some urban Ohio and Wisconsin areas. But not before civil rights groups said they could intimidate minority voters and decrease turnout. Host Michel Martin talks with WCPN reporter Brian Bull about the billboards, who paid for them, and concerns about their lasting impact.

Children's Health
11:45 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Tips On Explaining The Storm To Young Ones

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 12:03 pm

Millions of Americans are dealing with the aftermath of Sandy, including the responsibility of comforting children who may not have a frame of reference for the storm. For tips on helping kids cope, host Michel Martin speaks with Suzanne McCabe of Scholastic's classroom magazines. The magazines cover the aftermath of all kinds of disasters.

China: Change Or Crisis
11:23 am
Thu November 1, 2012

For Complainers, A Stint In China's 'Black Jails'

A man walks through a former unofficial, or "black," jail in Beijing, in 2009. It's estimated that thousands of Chinese lodging protests against the government are illegally detained in secret sites such as this one, even though the government says they don't exist.
Elizabeth Dalziel AP

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 8:25 pm

People often say China is a nation of contrasts: of wealth and poverty, of personal freedom and political limits. But that observation doesn't begin to capture the tensions and incongruities of modern life here.

For instance, in today's Shanghai, you can sip a $31 champagne cocktail in a sleek rooftop bar overlooking the city's spectacular skyline, while, just a few miles away, ordinary citizens languish in a secret detention center run by government-paid thugs.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:55 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Latest Figures On Deaths, Power Outages Related To Sandy

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 5:57 pm

NPR's librarians are helping us keep track of two sobering statistics about Superstorm Sandy:

As of 6 p.m. ET:

-- According to NPR's count, the death toll remains at 91. The AP count has now moved up to 90.

New York City alone is reporting 37 deaths. New Jersey reported 12 and Maryland 11.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:30 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Consumer Confidence Hits Highest Point In Nearly Five Years

"Black Friday" 2011 in Manhattan. Will consumers come out in force this holiday season? Their confidence was high in October.
Michael Nagle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 10:39 am

By at least one measure, in October consumers were the most confident they've been since February 2008, the private Conference Board reports.

Read more
Science
10:23 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Sandy's Two-Fisted Attack: Water From Air And Sea

Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 10:36 am

On Monday, Sandy brought heavy rain, winds and storm surges to the Northeast, causing widespread flooding and extensive damage to hundreds of communities, particularly in New Jersey and New York.

But the drenching from all that water varied greatly by region.

In areas south of Atlantic City, N.J., where the storm made landfall Monday night, the wind was pushing out toward the ocean. This prevented high storm tides along the Virginia, Maryland and Delaware coasts and in Chesapeake Bay. But the same arm of the storm that held the ocean at bay carried a lot of rain.

Read more
It's All Politics
10:15 am
Thu November 1, 2012

The GOP Has Its Eyes On Another Election Day Prize: Arkansas

Welcome to Arkansas ... will it apply to the GOP on Election Day? Republicans haven't had control over both state legislative chambers since 1874.
Fotosearch Getty Images/Fotosearch RF

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 11:17 am

Arkansas voters are about to make history, one way or another.

Democrats have selected as their incoming House leader Darrin Williams, who would serve as the state's first African-American speaker.

But Williams might never get to hold the gavel. Republicans believe they have a good shot at taking control of the Arkansas House — and Senate — for the first time since 1874.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:52 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Some Mixed Signals From Latest Jobs Numbers

Job seekers were on line at a career fair in Manhattan back in August.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 9:02 am

Three closely watched employment indicators are out this morning:

-- Unemployment Benefits. There were 363,000 first-time claims for jobless benefits last week, down from 372,000 the week before, the Employment and Training Administration says. So, as they have all year, claims remain in a range between 350,000 and 400,000.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:25 am
Thu November 1, 2012

For Obama And Romney, It's Back To The Campaign After Sandy

Early voters waited in line Wednesday in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

The campaign calm after the storm is about to end.

Both President Obama and his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney, will be out stumping for votes today. The race for the White House, which was just about put on hold as Superstorm Sandy bore down on the East Coast and then roared ashore, is back on with just five days to go before Election Day.

Romney will be in Virginia. The president will be in Wisconsin, Colorado and Nevada.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:36 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Slowly, Surely New York And New Jersey Start To Recover From Sandy

That's one way to get around: A skateboarder Wednesday on First Avenue in Manhattan.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 10:56 am

  • From 'Morning Edition'

Life is no where near back to normal in New Jersey, New York City and surrounding areas that were punched hard by Superstorm Sandy, and it won't be for days if not weeks.

But on Morning Edition, NPR correspondents in Manhattan, Queens, Newark, N.J., and Stamford, Conn., were reporting that:

-- Limited subway service has been restored in Manhattan.

Read more
World
5:59 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Russia Set To Redefine Treason, Sparking Fears

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:41 am

Russia's parliament has approved an expanded legal definition of high treason, prompting accusations that President Vladimir Putin's government wants to further crack down on opponents.

Supporters say the proposed changes bring Russia's law up-to-date and will help the country's security service counter modern forms of spying and interference by foreign governments.

Opponents, including human rights groups, say the bill's language has been made so vague that it could potentially be used to punish almost any Russian who has contacts with foreigners

Read more
Shots - Health News
5:58 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Sandy Leaves Long List Of Health Threats

People look at homes and businesses destroyed during Superstorm Sandy on Tuesday in the Rockaway section of Queens, N.Y.
Spencer Plat Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:36 pm

Public health officials are warning that people in areas devastated by Superstorm Sandy face many risks in the aftermath and are urging people to protect themselves from health threats in the water, air and even their refrigerators.

As millions of people try to put their lives back together, the most obvious threat is the floodwaters themselves. In many places, the water could be a toxic stew.

Read more

Pages