David Folkenflik

Geraldo Rivera of Fox News has described NPR's David Folkenflik as "a really weak-kneed, backstabbing, sweaty-palmed reporter." Others have been kinder. The Columbia Journalism Review, for example, once gave him a "laurel" for reporting that immediately led the U.S. military to institute safety measures for journalists in Baghdad.

Based in New York City, Folkenflik is the media correspondent for NPR News. His stories and analyses are broadcast on the network's newsmagazines, such as All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Here & Now, and are featured on NPR's website and mobile platforms. Folkenflik's reports cast light on the stories of our age, the figures who shape journalism and the tectonic shifts affecting the news industry. He profiled the Las Vegas columnist who went bankrupt fending off a libel lawsuit from his newspaper's new owner; conducted the first interview with New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet after his appointment; and chronicled how the demands of technology have forced the press corps to change how it covers presidential primaries.

Folkenflik is the author of Murdoch's World: The Last of the Old Media Empires. The Los Angeles Times called Murdoch's World "meaty reading... laced with delicious anecdotes" and the Huffington Post described it as "the gift that keeps on giving." Folkenflik is also editor of Page One: Inside the New York Times and the Future of Journalism. His work has appeared in such publications as the Washington Post, Politico Magazine, Newsweek International, the National Post of Canada, and the Australian Financial Review. Business Insider has called Folkenflik one of the 50 most influential people in American media.

Folkenflik joined NPR in 2004 after more than a decade at the Baltimore Sun, where he covered higher education, national politics, and the media. He started his professional career at the Durham (N.C.) Herald-Sun. Folkenflik served as editor-in-chief at the Cornell Daily Sun and graduated from Cornell with a bachelor's degree in history.

A four-time winner of the Arthur Rowse Award for Press Criticism from the National Press Club, Folkenflik has received numerous other recognitions, including the inaugural 2002 Mongerson Award for Investigative Reporting on the News and top honors from the National Headliners Club and the Society of Professional Journalists. He was the first Irik Sevin Visiting Fellow at Cornell and speaks frequently across the country. He often appears as a media analyst for television and radio programs in the U.S., the U.K., Canada, Australia and Ireland. Folkenflik lives with his wife, who is the senior director for original content at Audible (wholly owned by Amazon), and children in New York City.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: The story of the recaptured drug kingpin Joaquin El Chapo Guzman would have had the world's attention no matter what, but the story became even more bizarre once it was revealed that Hollywood star Sean Penn conducted an interview with El Chapo in the months before Friday's arrest. We learned that after Penn wrote about the meeting for Rolling Stone. We're going to talk about the reaction to that piece...

Donald Trump has changed the rules of engagement with the media and all on his own terms, driving his campaign through a sustained barrage of interviews on major TV shows, staging huge televised rallies and picking fights with his opponents on social media. The media have been along for the ride, thankful for the ratings, reveling in a colorful character charting an unpredictable course atop the polls, and fearful of missing what might come next. Yet as Trump's rise has been accompanied by,...

A story about a deadly terrorist attack briefly inspired a frenzied media scrum Friday morning in Southern California when dozens of reporters and TV news crews entered the home of the two shooters in the San Bernardino massacre. NPR's Nate Rott spoke to the landlord at the shooters' apartment in nearby Redlands after the scrum began. The landlord says he allowed journalists into the home of Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik after it was returned to his control by federal law enforcement...

The documentary The Hunting Ground , a searing look at the failure of American universities to grapple successfully with campus rape, has been embraced by CNN and shortlisted for next year's Oscars, while helping to sharpen the focus of college administrators. "Colleges and universities have a real responsibility to keep their students safe. Obviously being sexually assaulted is completely a safety issue," Hunting Ground director Kirby Dick told NPR. "If approximately 1 in 5 women are being...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: CNN has been getting legal warnings about a documentary it aired last night. The film is called "The Hunting Ground." CNN helped produce it. The documentary makes the case that school administrators have often been indifferent to young female victims of sexual assault on college campuses. NPR's David Folkenflik reports. DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: The film was first released in January at the Sundance...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: You know, we talk about presidential candidates fighting during debates. Now they are fighting about the debates. Many of the Republican hopefuls were furious at CNBC, which hosted last week's forum. Officials from many campaigns met over the weekend to try to agree on some demands for future broadcasts. Of course, yesterday, Donald Trump said he would negotiate with TV networks on his own terms, which...

On Thursday, Josh Tyrangiel announced his resignation from Bloomberg News, where he was editor of the Bloomberg Businessweek magazine and oversaw strategic thinking for the rest of its news operations as chief content officer. His departure shows the degree to which Bloomberg LP founder and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has put his mark on the company since his surprise return as CEO late last year. Tyrangiel will be replaced by his deputy, Ellen Pollock , the first female...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: For the first time since its founding in 1888, National Geographic magazine will become a for-profit publication. It's expanding a partnership with 21st Century Fox. NPR's David Folkenflik reports. DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: The National Geographic Society has been known for discovery, education and research since its start. CEO Gary Knell says not much has changed. GARY KNELL: Its mission is really to...

The photographs of 3-year-old Aylan Kurdi, his lifeless body washed up onto a Turkish beach, forced the current refugee crisis onto front pages, home pages and Facebook feeds across the world this week. "The image resonates personally before it resonates professionally," David Miliband, president of the International Rescue Committee, and the former British foreign minister, told NPR. "Anyone's who got children can't help but think of the worst for the moment." "In the case of this image it...

It's all too raw: the grieving of survivors, the images of carnage, the way we learn of events and the way we consume them. Viewers of the morning show for WDBJ-TV in Roanoke, Va., actually watched the deadly shootings of reporter Alison Parker and videographer Adam Ward. And they watched it live, unexpectedly, without warning. So did the program's anchors, who were themselves shocked, initially uncomprehending, appalled. Others quickly grabbed that footage from WDBJ-TV and posted it online...

Journalism isn't brain surgery — a distinction wrapped in a witticism that CNN's Sanjay Gupta must be tired of hearing. Yet while he was covering the aftermath of a deadly earthquake in Nepal this year, the journalism evidently proved trickier than the brain surgery. Gupta, a star news correspondent and Emory University trauma neurosurgeon, appears to have misidentified a patient on whom he operated. The tale of how that happened, both twisty and subtle, throws fresh light on Gupta's dual...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: The chief news anchor at ABC is the subject of controversy. Today, George Stephanopoulos acknowledged giving $75,000 to the Clinton Foundation. That's been since 2012, and it's despite Hillary Clinton's presidential ambitions. Stephanopoulos has apologized, but the revelation is a reminder of his earlier career in politics working for the Clintons. And now many conservative critics are claiming it's...

Recent reports have suggested that Brian Williams' professional purgatory is about to come to an end. NBC suspended its chief news anchor early this year for falsely claiming that the Army helicopter in which he traveled while covering the 2003 invasion of Iraq was shot down by a rocket-propelled grenade. The Washington Post and New York Times reported that an ongoing internal inquiry at NBC has found multiple instances of other inflated stories, while the New York Daily News wrote that new...

NPR has named Michael Oreskes, a top Associated Press executive and former New York Times editor who has led newsrooms in such global centers as New York, Washington and Paris, to run its news division. Officially, Oreskes will be the network's senior vice president for news and editorial director, a slightly refashioned title. Oreskes is currently vice president and senior managing editor at the AP, where he oversees the giant international news wire's daily report. In an interview, Oreskes...

The parent company of NBC, Comcast, has turned to a familiar figure to lead the network's troubled news division, naming Andrew Lack as chairman to shore up its credibility, its finances and its stability. The appointment follows the scandal that led to the suspension of chief anchor Brian Williams, who inflated the dangers he faced while covering the invasion of Iraq. It is not clear whether Williams will return. In addition, the network has struggled to set a clear course for the Today Show...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: NBC took nearly a week to suspend its chief news anchor Brian Williams after it became clear he had told a false story about the dangers he faced in Iraq. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik spoke to two former network news chiefs who say the Williams's case raises fundamental questions about the role network anchors play. DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: David Westin was president of ABC News from 1997...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: NBC and its parent company, Comcast, have a dilemma - whether to stick with the top-rated TV anchor whose credibility is damaged. Brian Williams was suspended yesterday for six months after lying about a wartime reporting experience. Among the people who carry great weight behind the scenes at NBC News is Williams' retired predecessor, Tom Brokaw. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik has been...

Greek-born author Arianna Huffington created a digital powerhouse in May 2005 on the back of two major elements: famous bloggers, and the relentless aggregation of stories from elsewhere on politics, pop culture and almost everything else. Huffington Post's original reporting really came later — and so did a Pulitzer Prize. But the clickbait endures. Yet now, Huffington tells NPR, the site will dedicate itself to reporting positive news. In an interview, Huffington reveals the details of her...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: NBC News anchor Brian Williams was not in a helicopter brought down by a rocket-propelled grenade - that much we know. Last night, Williams retracted and apologized for a story that he told last week about reporting in Iraq in 2003. But many journalists contend it did not clarify how he incorrectly recounted his own experiences. And some critics even say he lied. NPR media correspondent David...

The year started well and has only improved for Rupert Murdoch, the media magnate atop the twin corporate holdings of News Corp. and 21st Century Fox. With caustic commentary on Twitter, Murdoch helped make the case that former GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney should depart the hustings. Through his tabloids, he has argued for a new agenda for the struggling conservative governments his publications had championed in Australia and the U.K. In all three instances, the octogenarian...

Today marks the return of a cult public television hit — Foyle's War . It previously appeared as part of PBS's big Sunday night Masterpiece lineup, but it won't be on TV tonight. For now, viewers will have to stream the show digitally. Acorn, the company that produces Foyle's War , has embarked on something of a Netflix strategy — raising the question of whether a niche pay portal can be a going concern. Acorn has long sold videos and DVDs of the hundreds of hours of U.K. shows for which it...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Tens of millions of people will watch President Obama's State of the Union address tonight. It's an enormous audience, but it's far fewer than watch the Super Bowl, and it'll likely be far fewer than watch the State of the Union just a few years ago. So in order to make sure that his message resonates this year, the president has traveled far and wide, literally and virtually. NPR media correspondent...

Among those hoping for an Academy Award nomination on Thursday are the producers of the Fox Studios thriller Gone Girl. The film centers on marital strife, a mysterious disappearance and the murder investigation that ensues. Gone Girl contains, however, a knowing critique of how the media operate during moments of scandal. The sharpest satire is of a fictional cable host named Ellen Abbott who serves as a televised Greek chorus throughout the movie. Abbott calls one prominent defense lawyer...

NPR CEO Jarl Mohn today named veteran print reporter Elizabeth Jensen as the public radio network's fifth ombudsman. "I think the primary responsibility is to report the concerns of NPR's listeners and to show NPR's journalism is ... transparent and accountable," Jensen said in an interview. "It's a two-way conversation." Jensen, a former media reporter for the Los Angeles Times, has written extensively about public broadcasting for The New York Times and the trade publication Current since...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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