Jake Neher

MPRN Capitol Reporter

Jake Neher is a state Capitol reporter for the Michigan Public Radio Network. 

He joined MPRN in September of 2012. Before that he served as a reporter and anchor for WFUV Public Radio in the Bronx, New York, and as News Director for KBRW Public Radio in Barrow, Alaska. He has been working in radio in some capacity since he was 15 years old.

A native of southeast Michigan, Jake graduated from Central Michigan University in 2010. He has a master's degree in public communications from Fordham University.


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Michigan State House of Representatives
Wikipedia Media Commons / wikipedia.org

People would face criminal penalties for coercing someone to have an abortion under a bill in the state House.   

Medical Marijuana Support
Wikipedia Media Commons / wikipedia.org

A state House panel has approved long-stalled bills to overhaul Michigan’s medical marijuana system.   Jake Neher has the details.


Michigan Child and Adult Protective Services workers are eligible for more overtime pay after a recent arbitration decision. There are now more situations that qualify on-call employees working at home for overtime.


New bills in the state House would add restrictions on abortions and protections for religious leaders who refuse to marry same-sex couples.  But, as Jake Neher reports below, the future of the bills could be hampered by the representative who introduced them.

Brian Calley
Wikipedia Media Commons

Michigan Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley is pushing for changes in the state's special education system.

Solar Panels Ypsi

There’s heated debate over the future of renewable energy policy in Michigan – and it’s not just Democrats versus Republicans.  

Creative Commons / flickr.com

Democrats in the state House won’t support big budget cuts for roads if it’s not clear where they’d come from.

The state will request a crucial waiver on Tuesday needed to prevent hundreds of thousands of Michiganders from losing their health insurance.

Juvenile Prisoner Michigan
Wikimedia Commons

A lawsuit claiming juvenile inmates were sexually assaulted and harassed while being housed as adults has been dismissed.

 Plaintiffs claim guards failed to protect their safety in prison. 


Michigan Attorney Bill Schuette is endorsing Jeb Bush for president in 2016. He announced on Wednesday that he’ll serve as chair for Bush’s campaign organization in Michigan.

State lawmakers are considering taxing and tracking medical marijuana in Michigan.

The state Senate is one step closer to confirming Gov. Rick Snyder’s appointment of a former Consumers Energy lobbyist to a panel that regulates utilities.

Mackinac Pipeline
Greg Varnum/Wikimedia Commons

Enbridge Energy is sponsoring new efforts to monitor waters above its aging pipeline in the Straits of Mackinac.

WikiMedia Commons

The new head of the Michigan Department of Education, Brian Whiston says he’ll act on his own to improve teacher evaluations if lawmakers fail to do so. The state Senate approved a bill in May meant to improve teacher evaluations and make them more uniform across the state. Senate Bill 103 has since stalled in the state House.

Michigan may have to pay up to $2 million in legal fees related to the case that struck down the state’s same-sex marriage ban.

The six attorneys who successfully challenged the ban want the state to reimburse them for their legal costs. They say they worked thousands of hours on the case – which was ultimately decided by the U.S. Supreme Court.

The Pill, Birth Control, Michigan
Wikimedia Commons

The State of Michigan would have to take measures meant to increase access to birth control under new proposals in the state Legislature.

Medical Marijuanna Austim
Wikimedia Commons

The Michigan Medical Marihuana Review Board Monday delayed any decision on adding autism to the list of conditions in which medical marijuana could be an approved treatment.

A new bill in the state House would require schools to adopt policies on social media interactions between students and school employees. Supporters of House Bill 4791 say social media can be a great tool for teachers to communicate with students.

State lawmakers could consider adding new penalties for universities that hike tuition above the state’s cap on tuition increases. This year, lawmakers set that cap at 3.2 percent.

Oakland University this week decided to join Eastern Michigan University in blowing past the cap. OU will hike tuition 8.48 percent, and EMU will raise tuition 7.8 percent.

Education Funding

Gov. Rick Snyder has signed bills into law meant to prevent financial emergencies in schools.

The state and intermediate schools districts (ISDs) now have more power to step in sooner when schools show signs of financial trouble.

Ann Arbor-Saline Road
Andrew Cluley / 89.1 WEMU

A plan to boost road funding by about $1 billion a year could clear the state House this week. House Speaker Kevin Cotter (R-Mt. Pleasant) is pushing a plan that would rely mostly on shifting existing funds in the state budget and expected revenue increases in the coming years. 

Michigan would give police less freedom to seize and sell property under bills making their way through the state Legislature. The state House approved the bills on Thursday with wide bipartisan support.

Bake Sale Michigan
Creative Commons/ Flickr / joelorama

Gov. Rick Snyder has signed a bill that will allow student groups to sell baked goods in school to raise money.

New federal guidelines adopted by the Michigan Department of Education limited the kinds of food that could be sold in school. Several groups complained that the guidelines hindered their ability to fundraise.

A state elections board has given a green light to a petition drive to ban prevailing wage requirements in Michigan.

The petition language mirrors legislation currently in the state House that would end laws requiring union-level pay and benefits for workers on publicly-funded construction projects. Those bills appear to be stalled.


Gov. Rick Snyder outlined a public safety agenda on Monday that includes parole and sentencing reforms, job training for inmates, and more help finding a job once they’re released from prison.

Snyder says there are data-driven ways to reduce the state’s prison population without compromising public safety.