All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4:00PM-7:00PM

WEMU's All Things Considered local host is Bob Eccles who anchors all local news segments during the program.

NPR's All Things Considered paints the bigger picture with reports on the day's news, analysis of world events, and thoughtful commentary.

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Analysis
3:00 pm
Sat November 26, 2011

Week In News: Pakistan Rift, Egypt Protests, GOP Debate

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 7:05 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

With more on this story and the rest of the week's news, we're joined now by Doyle McManus. He's the Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, and he has graciously agreed to stand in for our regular news analyst, James Fallows. Doyle, thanks so much for being with us.

DOYLE MCMANUS: Thank you for having me.

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Space
3:00 pm
Sat November 26, 2011

Cruising To Mars: The Rover's Tasks

NASA launched the Mars Science Laboratory from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Saturday. The MSL is five times heavier than the rovers currently on Mars and has twice as many scientific instruments. It will take nine months for the spacecraft to reach the Red Planet, and there's plenty of things for it to do before then.

The Impact of War
3:00 pm
Sat November 26, 2011

Marine's Life Forever Altered By War

Andrew Robinson was injured by a roadside bomb during his second deployment to Iraq. Now a quadriplegic, he says he is learning how to use his limited mobility and is proud of having protected his fellow soldiers. He is especially motivated because his wife is expecting twins next month.

Author Interviews
1:23 pm
Sat November 26, 2011

'Chicks With Guns': A Picture Of Gun-Toting Women

Photographer Lindsay McCrum's new book includes images of women who feel that hunting is a way to bring people and family together. Among those women is Alexandra, who poses for McCrum with her son, Truett, and her Ithaca 20-gauge side-by-side shotgun.
Lindsay McCrum

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 7:05 pm

If you turn to page 109 of Lindsay McCrum's photo book, you'll see a photo of a woman wearing jeans and a green baseball cap standing in a grassy field. She's looking straight at the camera, clutching a semi-automatic rifle as if it were a water bottle. Standing between her legs is her son, his blond hair peeking out from behind her thigh as he poses with his toy gun, a miniature of his mother's.

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Music
5:30 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

For Pesky Relatives, A CD-Buying Gift Guide

Shabazz Palaces.
David Belisle and Leif Podhajsky

When Rachel Martin was given a slot guest-hosting weekends at All Things Considered, she took the opportunity to get a little holiday shopping out of the way. Needing musical stocking-stuffers for a few pesky relatives — her fiance's mom, for example, or her dad, who likes "Tchaikovsky and Johnny Cash" — she consulted NPR Music's Stephen Thompson, and asked him for some tips.

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Opinion
4:21 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Letters: A Thanksgiving Tale

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 4:55 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz. And now it's time for your letters - all about our annual Thanksgiving Day story by writer Bailey White. This year, Bailey told us about a Florida painter who moved to Vermont, where he has trouble fitting in. At a neighbor's suggestion, he turns to raising turkeys.

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Books
2:11 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

Bailey White's Thanksgiving Story: 'Call It Even'

iStockphoto.com

It's been an All Things Considered Thanksgiving tradition since 1991— a Bailey White original short story. Over the years, White's stories have included tales about a rose queen, a telephone man, an ostrich farmer and a wife exacting revenge. This year, White presents "Call It Even." It's about a shy painter who moves from Florida to Vermont and wants to feel like he fits in — so he raises a dozen turkeys.

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Music Interviews
2:00 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

Ingrid Gerdes: A Tomboy With Soul

Ingrid Gerdes says she is influenced by Southern soul-blues.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 5:28 pm

Originally from Springfield, Mo., "the Ozarks area of Missouri," Ingrid Gerdes is a neo-soul performer out of Boston, but she considers herself a Southern singer. Her latest album is titled Shed.

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Planet Money
4:28 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Boom Town, U.S.A.

Brandi and Kaylee plan to open a truck repair shop when they graduate from high school.
Robert Smith NPR

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 6:12 pm

In the small-town of Elko, ambition looks like high-heel suede booties on the floor of the auto shop at the local high school.

Brandi and Kaylee look like the Olsen twins. And they're the best auto-shop students at Elko High. The girls have a plan. Everyday out the school window, they see trucks heading up to the gold mines. Day and night. So, the girls figure, why not open a truck repair shop after they graduate?

"In Elko we've been really blessed and really lucky to actually have a good economy," Kaylee says. "We can actually have our hopes and dreams."

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Music Interviews
4:00 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Robert Johnson And Pablo Casals' Game-Changers Turn 75

Spanish musician and composer Pablo Casals, playing the cello in 1936.
Fox Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 3:45 pm

Nov. 23, 1936, was a good day for recorded music. Two men, an ocean apart, each stepped up to a microphone and began to play. One was a cello prodigy who had performed for the queen of Spain; the other was a guitar player in the juke joints of the Mississippi Delta. But on that day, Pablo Casals and Robert Johnson each made recordings that would change music history.

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National Security
3:00 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Pentagon Faces Significant Cuts

The Pentagon faces significant cuts in its budget — no matter whether the congressional supercommittee succeeded or failed at finding more ways to reduce the federal deficit. The military plans to cut nearly $500 billion from its budget. One place to look for cuts: in the Army and also the Air Force's stealthy and pricey F-35.

Law
8:09 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Government Whistle-Blowers Gain New Advocate

Carolyn Lerner is the new head of the U.S. Office of Special Counsel.
Peter Krogh Courtesy of U.S. Office of Special Counsel

The U.S. Office of Special Counsel is one of those small corners of the government with an important mission: It's supposed to help protect federal whistle-blowers and shield civil service workers from politics.

But during the Bush years, the office was engulfed in scandal. It was raided by FBI agents, and its chief was indicted for obstructing justice.

It's into that unsettled environment that the new leader, Carolyn Lerner, arrived five months ago. And good government groups say she's already taking the office in new directions.

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Planet Money
4:17 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

The National Debt: What The Left And Right Agree On

Supercommittee members, Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona and Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 11:15 am

The congressional supercommittee announced Monday that it failed to come to an agreement on reducing the deficit. After three months of negotiating, the Democrats and Republicans just couldn't agree on how much spending to cut or how high to raise taxes.

But this is not a story about how the left and right disagree with each other. In fact, they actually largely agree.

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Economy
6:20 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Obama Blames Republicans For Debt Panel's Failure

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 9:27 pm

President Obama Monday put the blame for the supercommittee's failure squarely on congressional Republicans — and their unwillingness to consider higher taxes on the wealthy. Obama also threatened to veto any effort to escape from the automatic spending cuts agreed to in August without a balanced plan to reduce the deficit. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Scott Horsley for more.

Economy
6:17 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Supercommittee Fails To Reach Debt Deal

The bipartisan supercommittee says it failed to reach a deficit-reduction deal. NPR's Tamara Keith speaks to Robert Siegel with the latest from Capitol Hill.

Three Books...
4:08 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Presidents And Pilgrims: 3 Boundary Pushing Books

Donna Neary flickr.com

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 9:27 pm

With Thanksgiving hard upon us, now is a good time to think about our past. History writers can tell the best stories from centuries of human achievement and folly, yet too often they produce recitations of one damned thing after another. A few, though, combine a respect for accuracy with a deep understanding of the longings, fears and triumphs of the people of our past. Such books make magic.

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Planet Money
4:00 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Buying A Savings Bond Is About To Get Harder

U.S. Treasury Department

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:15 am

Paper savings bonds used to be a wholesome part of American culture. You bought them when your kids were born, to save for college. You bought them to save for a home.

But starting next month, they'll be a lot harder to get. Banks will stop selling paper savings bonds on January 1, 2012.

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Music Interviews
3:21 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Yo-Yo Ma's Bluegrass-Inspired 'Goat Rodeo'

Yo-Yo Ma's latest Americana exploration features his work with mandolinist Chris Thile, bassist Edgar Meyer and fiddler Stuart Duncan.
Jeremy Cowart

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 1:27 pm

A sense of humor comes through The Goat Rodeo Sessions, the latest Americana exploration for the world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma.

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Television
5:48 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

How One Man Played 'Moneyball' With 'Jeopardy!'

Roger Craig poses with Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek after winning $250,000 in last week's Tournament of Champions.
Carol Kaelson Sony Pictures

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 6:32 pm

One night last September, Roger Craig, a computer scientist from Newark, Del., was about to make history.

In his second appearance on Jeopardy!, he'd given one of the most dominant performances ever seen on the show.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

Libya Weighs Life After Gadhafi

It's been one month since Moammar Gadhafi's death. Libyans were celebrating within hours of his killing. A month later, the jubilance has waned and the violence continues. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan talks with New York Times correspondent Clifford Krauss from Tripoli.

Author Interviews
2:15 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

Bill Maher Lays Down The (Mostly Silly) Law

Comedian Bill Maher is the host of the HBO political commentary show, Real Time With Bill Maher.
Janet Van Ham AP

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 6:32 pm

Comedian Bill Maher wraps up every installment of his TV show, Real Time, with a segment called "New Rules." That's where he takes potshots at whatever's bothering him — from wrappers on ice cream cones, to red light cameras, to more serious subjects like war and economic ruin.

His new book, The New New Rules: A Funny Look at How Everybody But Me Has Their Head Up Their Ass, sports a title we can't say on the radio and a mix of rules both lighthearted and serious, some of which never appeared on television.

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Music Interviews
1:58 am
Sun November 20, 2011

The Man Behind The Music Of 'Entourage' Sets The Tone

Scott Vener is the music supervisor for How to Make It in America. The finale of the second season airs Sunday night on HBO.
Jeff Forney HBO

Scott Vener is the music supervisor for How to Make It in America, which air its season finale Sunday night on HBO.

"I would say primarily a lot of the music I'm finding is sort of like what is bubbling on the Internet," Vener says.

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Analysis
3:00 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

Week In News: Obama Wraps Up Asia Tour

Originally published on Sat November 19, 2011 6:37 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

It's Weekends on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

MAHMOUD SHAMMAM: What we can confirm now that Saif al-Gadhafi has been arrested and he should be tried in front of the Libyan court, by Libyan people and by Libyan justice.

SULLIVAN: That's Mahmoud Shammam, Libya's National Transitional Council's information minister, announcing that Moammar Gadhafi's son Saif al-Islam had been captured. The U.S. State Department hasn't confirmed it yet.

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Science
1:57 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

Perhaps Scientists Like Lab Mice TOO Much

The lab mouse is the most ubiquitous animal in biomedical research, but that doesn't mean it's always the best subject for researching disease.

In a series of articles for Slate magazine, Daniel Engber looked into why the mouse is such a mainstay of science — and whether that's a good thing.

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Music Interviews
1:19 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

We Are Augustines: Old Wounds Inspire Recovery Songs

We Are Augustines' debut album is Rise Ye Sunken Ships. Left to right: Eric Sanderson, Rob Allen, Billy McCarthy.
Arwen Hunt Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 4:32 pm

Billy McCarthy lost his mother to suicide when he was a teenager. He cared for his schizophrenic brother as best he could after that, but his brother landed in solitary confinement in prison, where he eventually took his own life, too. Somehow, McCarthy found a way to rise above his anguish — as a songwriter. He began playing music while living in foster care in California.

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