All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4:00PM-7:00PM

WEMU's All Things Considered local host is Bob Eccles who anchors all local news segments during the program.

NPR's All Things Considered paints the bigger picture with reports on the day's news, analysis of world events, and thoughtful commentary.

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Monkey See
3:03 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

'100 Yards To Glory': What Eli Manning Told Bob Costas About His Pores

Bob Costas, co-author of a new book and DVD set counting down the greatest moments in NFL history.
NBC Universal Photo Bank

On today's All Things Considered, Robert Siegel poses an important question to Bob Costas, one of the authors of a new book about the greatest moments in football: With football so popular and beloved and money-making, why is baseball still considered our national pastime? What does football have to do to get a little love?

"Hey, leave baseball something," Costas says of the special, nostalgic language with which we often speak of it. "In every other measurable way, football has surpassed it."

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Presidential Race
3:00 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Cain Speaks On Sexual Misconduct Allegations

GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain undertook his first serious interviews since the allegations by a Chicago woman on Monday of sexual misconduct when she was seeking help from Cain during a job hunt. NPR's Tamara Keith joins Robert Siegel to explain.

Economy
5:39 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Why Is Food Stamp Usage Rising So Fast?

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 8:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The number of Americans who use food stamps is now close to 46 million, that's 15 percent of the population. The program is formally known as SNAP these days, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. And the number of people who depend on it to buy groceries has grown substantially, even since the recession was officially declared over, back in June of 2009.

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Presidential Race
3:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Newest Cain Accuser Holds Press Conference

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 8:04 pm

GOP presidential contender Herman Cain may have a difficult time getting his campaign back "on message" after a week spent responding to allegations of sexual harassment. Attorney Gloria Allred held a news conference in New York on Monday afternoon for a woman who says she was sexually harassed by Cain.

Law
3:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Michael Jackson's Personal Physician Found Guilty

Robert Siegel talks with NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates about Monday's verdict in the trial of Dr. Conrad Murray. Michael Jackson's personal physician was found guilty.

Economy
3:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Report: Wealth Gap Widens Between Old And Young

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 8:04 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. We've been hearing a lot lately about the gap between rich and poor in this country. Well, now a new angle on that gap between young and old. Research out today finds that older Americans are significantly better off than seniors a generation ago, but young adults have fallen dramatically behind.

NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports.

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Law
3:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Penn State Officials Face Charges Related To Sex-Abuse Scandal

Two top administrators at Penn State University were in court Monday. They're facing charges in connection with an investigation into alleged sexual abuse by former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.

Technology
3:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

YouTube, Disney Team Up To Produce Original Content

YouTube and Disney are starting a small venture together for Disney to produce original content for YouTube. The big video streaming services, such as YouTube, Hulu and Netflix are moving into the area of professionally produced original content. Guy Raz speaks to NPR's Laura Sydell for more.

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Nobel Prize-Winning Physicist Norman Ramsey Dies At 96

We remember the man who contributed to the atomic clock, Norman Ramsey. He died Friday at age 96. A former head of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory outside of Chicago said of him "If you made a list of the most outstanding physicists of the 20th century, he'd be among the leaders."

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Rasmussen Discusses NATO Campaign In Libya

Robert Siegel interviews NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen. Rasmussen is in Washington, D.C., to meet with President Obama. He talks about the just-finished NATO campaign in Libya — and some of the weakness revealed during the campaign. He also addresses how budget woes among the alliance could affect NATO's strength.

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

For-Profit Education Provider Faces Trouble

Career Education Corporation, a major for-profit post-secondary education provider, is facing trouble after it admitted to supplying misleading information on job placement rates. Other for-profit companies are struggling too, under pressure from new federal rules.

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

A Look At The Reported Growth In Wall Street Profits

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 8:04 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Now, if anyone is doing well in this time of economic uncertainty, it is fair to say it is the banks. Wall Street firms earned more in the first two and a half years of the Obama administration than they did during the entire presidency of George W. Bush. That's according to a story today in the Washington Post by reporter Zach Goldfarb and he joins us now. Welcome to the program, Zach.

ZACHARY GOLDFARB: Nice to be here.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

How Does The CIA Use Social Media?

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 8:04 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

And it's time now for All Tech Considered. Today, a look at social media and the CIA. A group within the agency monitors Facebook updates and tweets from people overseas, up to 5 million a day. Kimberly Dozier got a rare inside look at these operations. She's the intelligence correspondent for the Associated Press, and she joins me in the studio. Welcome.

KIMBERLY DOZIER: Thank you.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Italy Teeters As Berlusconi Refuses To Step Down

Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi denied again that he was about to resign on Monday, an announcement that sent Italy's borrowing costs close to a level most analysts believe is unsustainable. Berlusconi is seen by many Italians as a major obstacle to Italy's escape from its current financial woes. He faces a number of difficult votes in parliament this week, but if forced to step down, he'll call new elections.

Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities
5:00 am
Mon November 7, 2011

Oklahoma Town Battles Powdery Carbon Pollution

The Continental Carbon plant sits on the southern outskirts of Ponca City, Okla. Residents blamed the plant, which produces a black dust known as carbon black, for polluting their city.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 1:55 pm

Part 2 of a four-part series, Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities

Karen Howe couldn't believe her luck. As a single mom working a minimum-wage job and living with two kids in a crowded one-bedroom apartment in Ponca City, Okla., she was desperate for a three-bedroom house and a lawn.

Howe, a member of the Ponca tribe, was offered tribal housing in a small, tree-lined subdivision of 11 homes on the southern, rural edge of the city.

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Around the Nation
5:33 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

Small Elections Drawing Big Money In Some States

A few years ago, in Wake County, N.C., Kevin Hill wanted to get involved in his community, so he ran for his local school board.

The campaign team consisting of Hill and his wife, with the help of some friends, raised about $6,000; he won the seat in the 2007 election. He's hoping to retain that seat in a runoff election Tuesday, but this time his campaign is a little bigger.

"[It went] from me and my wife to about 300 people," Hill says. "It's been mind-boggling to me that, for a school board race that is nonpartisan, the amounts of money that has been raised."

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Three-Minute Fiction
3:21 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

Three-Minute Fiction Winners: Where Are They Now?

Courtesy of Zach Brockhouse

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 6:59 pm

Three-Minute Fiction is All Things Considered's creative writing contest where our listeners submit an original short story that can be read in about three minutes — 600 words — or less. After weeks of reading a couple thousand submissions, a judge picks a winning story. Over the last two years, contestants have submitted about 29,000 stories, and only six have won.

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Latin America
3:00 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

In Nicaragua, Ortega Poised For Re-Election

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 6:59 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

It's Election Day in Nicaragua where President Daniel Ortega is running for an unprecedented third term. The country's constitution sets a two-term limit, but the Supreme Court declared that unconstitutional. The longtime Sandinistan leader has been leading in the polls. NPR's Jason Beaubien reports from Managua.

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Latin America
3:00 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

Nicaragua, Guatemala: '80s Rebels Seek Leadership

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 6:59 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

Nicaragua isn't the only country in Central America holding elections today. In Guatemala, people are also headed to the polls to choose a new president. And in both countries, the elections are fraught with history.

Back in the 1980s, Guatemala and Nicaragua were facing civil war and revolution. Twenty-five years later, both countries are still embattled but with different issues.

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Interviews
3:00 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

What Do Occupy Wall Street Protesters Want?

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 6:59 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

Occupy Wall Street is in its second month of protest, and the frustration with financial big wigs continues to grow. Tomorrow's protesters will track 11 miles from Upper Manhattan to Lower Manhattan, ending in Zuccotti Park, the place where it all started seven weeks ago. They're calling the walk End to End for 99%.

These events are becoming a familiar sight to bankers looking down from their high-rise windows onto the tent city below. But what's Wall Street really thinking about the so-called 99 percent just outside their offices?

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Music
4:48 pm
Sat November 5, 2011

From Samba To Flamenco, A Latin Grammy Preview

The Los Angeles band La Santa Cecilia is nominated in the Best Tropical Song category at this year's Latin Grammys.
Rene Miranda Courtesy of the artist

The 2011 Latin Grammy Awards will take place this Thursday in Las Vegas. For those unfamiliar with the categories and nominees, Betto Arcos of KPFK's Global Village returns to weekends on All Things Considered to play songs from a few of his favorite nominated performers. Included are a samba artist best known for his film role as a singing sailor, the reigning king of flamenco, one of Mexico's biggest bands and an L.A. ensemble that channels the various sounds of its city.

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Author Interviews
3:29 pm
Sat November 5, 2011

A Tale Of Forgiveness From The Tragedy Of Masada

Alice Hoffman is the author of more than 30 books.
Deborah Feingold alicehoffman.com

Originally published on Sat November 5, 2011 6:33 pm

When Jerusalem fell in 70 AD, hundreds of Jews journeyed through the desert and settled in the haven of Masada. In what is now southern Israel, Masada was an old fortress of King Herod's that sits atop an enormous rock plateau surrounded by steep cliffs.

"When I was there, I felt so moved and so connected," author Alice Hoffman tells Laura Sullivan, guest host of weekends on All Things Considered.

Hoffman was so struck by the beauty of Masada's rocky terrain, she says, that she chose to make it the backdrop in her new novel, The Dovekeepers.

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Art & Design
2:54 pm
Sat November 5, 2011

The Red Solo Cup: Every Party's Most Popular Guest

In 2009, the red Solo cup got extra grips and a square bottom.
Courtesy of Solo Cup Co.

Originally published on Sat November 5, 2011 6:44 pm

On most Saturday nights in college towns across the country, students get ready to party. The one thing all those parties will likely have in common — besides the keg, of course — is a stack of red plastic cups.

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Europe
7:03 pm
Fri November 4, 2011

Greek Prime Minister Survives Confidence Vote

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou survived a confidence vote in parliament. For more, Guy Raz talks to NPR's Sylvia Poggioli, who is in Athens.

Presidential Race
4:30 pm
Fri November 4, 2011

Lawyer For Cain Accuser Issues Statement

The lawyer for one of the women who have received settlements after filing sexual harassment complaints against GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain released a public statement. It rebuts Cain's statements that the claim was baseless. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Tamara Keith for more.

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