All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4:00PM-7:00PM

WEMU's All Things Considered local host is Bob Eccles who anchors all local news segments during the program.

NPR's All Things Considered paints the bigger picture with reports on the day's news, analysis of world events, and thoughtful commentary.

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Books News & Features
3:51 pm
Wed November 16, 2011

Ann Patchett Opens Parnassus Books In Nashville

The world of independent bookstores has a new member: Parnassus Books in Nashville, Tenn., opened its doors on Wednesday. The store has a marquee name behind it — best-selling novelist Ann Patchett, author of Bel Canto and State of Wonder, is the co-owner.

NPR Story
6:04 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

Lawmakers Consider Counting Pizza As a Veggie

Lawmakers say pizza and french fries deserve to keep their place in school cafeterias. New nutrition standards aimed at putting more fresh and healthy food in front of kids are being revised in a current House agriculture appropriations bill. The latest version says the tomato sauce on a slice of pizza is the equivalent of a vegetable. Critics are likening it to the "ketchup-as-a-vegetable-controversy" during the Reagan administration.

Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

N.Y. Police Clear Out Zuccotti Park

Occupy Wall Street protesters were evicted in a pre-dawn raid by New York City Police, and the encampment in Zuccotti Park was dismantled.

Iraq
3:00 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

Panetta Addresses Iraq Troop Withdrawal

Top Pentagon leaders went to Capitol Hill Tuesday and took tough questions from lawmakers on the future of the U.S. relationship with Iraq. Specifically, they addressed how the decision to withdraw all U.S. combat troops by the end of this year will impact Iraq's stability and U.S. national security interests in the region. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta told a congressional committee that, while U.S. military commanders wanted to keep a contingency force on the ground, it was Iraq's decision to make.

Author Interviews
12:18 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

Mark Kelly Tells Of Giffords' 'Courage' In Recovery

Mark Kelly has a new book about his wife, Rep. Gabby Giffords, and her road to recovery since she was shot in the head on Jan. 8.
Courtesy of P.K. Weis

Originally published on Tue November 15, 2011 8:35 pm

Earlier this year, on Jan. 8, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) was shot in the head as she met with constituents in Tucson, Ariz. She was one of 13 people injured that day. Six people were killed.

It had been four years since Giffords arrived in Washington as a wide-eyed freshman and told NPR: "Life's good and [I'm] very, very excited — so optimistic about taking our country in a new direction."

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Sports
5:00 pm
Mon November 14, 2011

NBA Players Decide To Disband Union

Transcript

GUY RAZ, host: From NPR News, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

MELISSA BLOCK: And I'm Melissa Block. Today, the Players' Union for the National Basketball Association decided to disband and take its fight with NBA owners to the courts. The move could jeopardize the entire 2011 to '12 NBA season. The union plans to argue that the NBA lockout of players is illegal and will sue the owners under antitrust laws.

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Author Interviews
3:55 pm
Mon November 14, 2011

In Don DeLillo's 'Angel,' Stories Of America Alone

Novelist Don DeLillo is known for his sweeping works of fiction, including White Noise, Falling Man, Libra and Underworld. His latest work, The Angel Esmeralda, is a collection of nine short stories.
Joyce Ravid Scribner

Over the past 30 years, prolific American author Don DeLillo has written more than a dozen novels, including White Noise, Falling Man, Libra and Underworld. But his latest, The Angel Esmeralda, is a departure from his expansive novels. It is a collection of short stories — nine brief flashes, which, like DeLillo's longer works, center on characters who feel out of sync with the worlds around them.

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You Must Read This
7:00 am
Mon November 14, 2011

Trapped In A Nightmare: A Sweet, Funny, Brutal Read

Ismet Prcic is the author of Shards.

Have you ever read a novel that is so propulsive you don't want to put it down (not even to play with your new kitten), and so well-plotted that it doesn't reveal itself to you until its 288th page — which just happens to be the book's final page as well? Marabou Stork Nightmares by Irvine Welsh is that kind of a novel.

On first glance, if you simply picked it up and shuffled its pages, it might not look appealing to some readers.

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Art & Design
4:31 pm
Sun November 13, 2011

Daphne Guinness: An Icon On Fashion's Cutting Edge

Eileen Costa Courtesy of The Museum at FIT

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:16 am

A good friend of mine is a Marcel Proust scholar and former milliner. She had just been to see fashion icon and brewery fortune heiress Daphne Guinness's exhibition at the Fashion Institute of Technology's Museum at FIT in New York when she sent me this email:

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Arts & Life
3:46 pm
Sun November 13, 2011

Mmm, Is That Roast Beef You Smell? No, It's Perfume

A Labor of Love: For his "I Hate Perfume" collection, Christopher Brosius blends and bottles all of his scents by hand in his workshops. The process may be labor-intensive, but it allows him to create singular scents that can't be mass-produced.
Courtesy of CB I Hate Perfume

Would you wear a perfume that made you smell like "A Day at the Beach?" How about "Baby's Butt?" If so, scent inventor Christopher Brosius can help. His Brooklyn boutique is at the vanguard of the anti-perfume movement, as you might suspect by its name: I Hate Perfume.

"I'm not out to sell millions of bottles," Brosius tells weekends on All Things Considered guest host Jacki Lyden. "My work is really about things that really do smell wonderful, but don't have a lot of the properties that commercial perfumes do."

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Music Interviews
2:58 pm
Sun November 13, 2011

Betty Wright: Soul Singer, Legacy Protector

Betty Wright's new album, her first in 10 years, is called Betty Wright: The Movie.
Diana Levine Courtesy of the artist

"I don't feel like I need to tell any lies," Betty Wright says. "You get to an age where you get tired of hiding behind whatever people think is correct. You just say what you have to say, and if they don't like it, it's OK."

Wright found fame in the 1970s as the voice behind the R&B hits "Clean Up Woman" and "Dance With Me." Today, Wright is much in demand as a vocalist, coach, writer, arranger and producer. Her first album out in 10 years is out this week; it's called Betty Wright: The Movie.

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Three-Minute Fiction
5:30 pm
Sat November 12, 2011

Three-Minute Fiction: The Round 7 Winner Is ...

iStockphoto.com

Round 7 of our Three-Minute Fiction contest attracted more than 3,000 story submissions. Tasked with writing an original short story that can be read in about three minutes, contestants had to include one character arriving to town and one character leaving town.

The judge for this round, writer Danielle Evans, has picked her favorite.

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Analysis
3:00 pm
Sat November 12, 2011

Week In News: Obama's Health Law Constitutional

This week D.C. Court of Appeals agreed with the White House that the health care law does not violate the Constitution. The court's senior judge, a respected conservative voice, wrote the majority opinion. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Jacki Lyden speaks with James Fallows of The Atlantic about this story and others from the past week.

Music Interviews
12:50 pm
Sat November 12, 2011

My Brightest Diamond: Home Is Where The Art Is

My Brightest Diamond is the indie-pop project of classically trained singer and composer Shara Worden.
Danny Renshaw Courtesy of the artist

There's no mistaking the protagonist of "Be Brave," a song from the new My Brightest Diamond album, All Things Will Unwind. Shara Worden, the group's classically trained singer, songwriter, and main creative force, makes it clear in the refrain: "Shara, now get to work/Shara, this is going to hurt."

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Theater
4:26 pm
Fri November 11, 2011

Hugh Jackman, Back On Broadway And Having A Blast

Hugh Jackman
Joan Marcus

Hugh Jackman has had one of the most bifurcated showbiz careers imaginable. He leapt to superstardom as the mutton-chopped mutant Wolverine in the X-Men movies and won a Tony Award as the gay Australian entertainer Peter Allen in The Boy from Oz. These days, he's starring in the robot-boxing film Real Steel and appearing on Broadway in a one-man show.

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Sports
3:00 pm
Fri November 11, 2011

Pacquiao, Marquez Face Off For Welterweight Title

As the boxing world mourns the death of champion Joe Frazier this week, they also are gearing up for a big bout this weekend between Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez. Robert Siegel talks with sportswriter Stefan Fatsis about the state of boxing in Joe Frazier's day — and now.

From Our Listeners
3:00 pm
Fri November 11, 2011

Letters: Ninja Librarians; Master Of Library Science

Robert Siegel and Guy Raz revisit arguably one of the program's most memorable phrases this week: ninja librarians. Also, they address one listener's email about the degree of Master of Library Science.

Music Interviews
2:19 pm
Fri November 11, 2011

The Subspecies Of Pianists, Or, What Jerry Lee Lewis And Beethoven Share

Jerry Lee Lewis, a pianist Isacoff classifies as a 'combustible,' performs at the Rainbow in London in 1972.
Graham Wood Getty Images

The art of the piano is a study in evolution — of both an instrument and of human talent. Among us there have been a rare few whose gifts included the physical dexterity, the innate musicality and the creativity to make the instrument sound brilliant.

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Music News
2:15 pm
Fri November 11, 2011

Vets Write Music To Heal The Wounds Of War

In front of the Texas flag: Iraq vet and aspiring songwriter Buddy Lee Dobberteen.
John Burnett

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 8:35 pm

Veterans Day is the day when Americans remember and thank members of the armed forces who fought in foreign wars. Nearly 1.4 million men and women have left the service since serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. A group of musicians in San Marcos, Texas, just down the highway from Austin, has started a songwriting workshop especially for returning veterans, believing that composing music can help a person heal from the wounds of war.

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Opinion
7:00 am
Fri November 11, 2011

Coming Home To Less Than A Hero's Welcome

Karl Marlantes receives the Navy Cross in the winter of 1969-70.
USMC

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 5:25 pm

Karl Marlantes is the author of What It Is Like To Go To War.

I returned to America in October of 1969 after 13 months as a Marine in Vietnam. While I was there, I would comfort myself by imagining all the girls I ever knew hugging me in a huge warm group embrace. Somehow, I thought something similar would be waiting for me when I came home.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Thu November 10, 2011

Murdoch Son Grilled Over Phone-Hacking Scandal

A steady drip of revelations in the News Corp. phone-hacking scandal has called into question James Murdoch's testimony before a parliamentary committee in July. Murdoch has been asked back to clarify the discrepancies.

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Thu November 10, 2011

Feds Delay Decision On Pipeline Project

The State Department is delaying a decision for at least a year on whether to approve the Keystone pipeline. The $7 billion pipeline would carry oil from the tar sands of Alberta, Canada, through the U.S. to Gulf of Mexico refineries. Nebraska's state government and environmental groups have put intense pressure on the State Department and White House to reject the pipeline's proposed route. NPR's Richard Harris talks with Robert Siegel about the project.

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Thu November 10, 2011

Major League Baseball Player Kidnapped In Venezuela

Washington Nationals catcher Wilson Ramos was abducted outside his home in Venezuela on Wednesday. Robert Siegel speaks with NPR's Juan Forero about the kidnapping.

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Thu November 10, 2011

Greece Announces Interim Government

After keeping a nervous world waiting for days, the squabbling politicians of debt-ridden Greece finally announced a new interim government Thursday. It will be headed by a former European Central banker, Lucas Papademos, whose main task will be to ensure that Greece meets the conditions set by its European partners to receive new loan money and avoid default. That means showing that Greece will enforce austerity measures.

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Thu November 10, 2011

Latest Economic News Sparks Optimism In U.S.

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 7:32 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Maybe it's not so bad. That seemed to be the read of investors when they saw today's economic numbers. Better than expected news about unemployment stoked some optimism that the U. S. will avoid a double-dip recession. And stock market recovered a bit from yesterday's drop.

But the news is not as good in Europe, as NPR's Chris Arnold reports

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