All Things Considered

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WEMU's All Things Considered local host is Bob Eccles who anchors all local news segments during the program.

NPR's All Things Considered paints the bigger picture with reports on the day's news, analysis of world events, and thoughtful commentary.

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Robert Siegel talks to Paris-based terrorism and security expert Jean-Charles Brisard about the terrorist cell in France known as the Buttes-Chaumont network in which Cherif Kouachi, one of the suspects in Wednesday's attack in Paris, was involved.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The new movie A Most Violent Year is set in New York City in 1981 — a chaotic time of spiraling crime. The story involves corruption in the heating oil industry: the hijacking of fuel tankers, a businessman trying to stay on the straight and narrow, and a prosecutor who has that businessman in his sights. And finally, there's the story of the businessman's wife ... who may hold all the cards.

Jessica Chastain plays Anna Morales, the upwardly mobile daughter of a Brooklyn gangster. She keeps the books for her husband's fuel business — as well as a number of secrets.

The Senate is set to vote on the Keystone XL pipeline, although President Obama has vowed to veto it. What does Nebraska's Supreme Court ruling allowing the pipeline to proceed mean for the administration and those opposed to the expansion? Melissa Block talks with attorney Brian Jorde, who represents the Nebraska landowners challenging the pipeline.

Buff Orpington chicken
Wikimedia Commons

Proposal to eliminate neighbor approval requirement divides City Council.


New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton confirmed there had been a work slowdown by officers in the weeks since two police officers were shot dead, but added that the matter was being corrected.

Flickr/ Creative Commons/Brixton

A volunteer program to keep sidewalks clear in one Ann Arbor neighborhood has passed it's first tests with this week's snow. 


Washtenaw County Public Health
Washtenaw County Public Health / facebook.com

Health care officials in Washtenaw County are hopeful flu season has already peaked.


Think Local First
facebook.com

A local farmer and musician has taken over an organization designed to promote Washtenaw County businesses and institutions. 


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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Corita Kent's silkscreens were once compared to Andy Warhol's; her banners and posters were featured at civil rights and anti-war rallies in the 1960s and '70s; she made the covers of Newsweek and The Saturday Evening Post; and she even created a popular postage stamp. Yet today, Kent seems to have fallen through the cracks of art history.

Researchers have developed a computer program they say can beat any human on the planet at a particular variant of Texas Hold'em poker.

The scientists aren't planning to clean up with their powerful poker bot. Instead, they hope it can help computers become better decision-makers in the face of uncertainty. The work is published Thursday in the journal Science.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Elvis Presley was better known for his music than his gourmet tastes. But he did have a famous affinity for the fried goodness of the American South — and he had the waistline to prove it.

In honor of what would have been the King of Rock 'n' Roll's 80th birthday, let's take a look at some of his legendary eating habits.

In Jordan, the talk these days centers on the fate of the Jordanian pilot who was captured by the self-styled Islamic State after his plane crashed in Syria on Christmas Eve.

Little is known about the condition of Moath al-Kasasbeh since the extremists tweeted pictures of him, bloody and bewildered, after the crash.

"Slow and steady wins the race."

"What's right for one may be wrong for another."

"Treat others the way you'd like to be treated."

Morals have long been the conclusion of fables and fairy tales aimed at kids. And today's TV shows and movies are no different — they often weave lessons for the younger generation into their narratives. But do children actually absorb these messages, or do these endings just help parents feel better about the media their kids consume?

Melissa Block talks to Elaine Sciolino, former Paris bureau chief for the New York Times, about the suspects in Wednesday's attack on the office of a satirical publication. Sciolino covered the apprehension and trial of one of the suspects, Cherif Kouachi, for his role in a France-based terror cell in the mid-2000s.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Robert Siegel talks to Patrick Weil, professor and senior research fellow at the French National Research Center in the University of Paris 1, Pantheon-Sorbonne, about how the attack on the satirical publication, Charlie Hebdo, relates to ongoing political tensions in France.

Opening arguments began Wednesday in the case against the Texas law requiring abortion clinics to meet the standards of ambulatory surgery centers. Opponents say it would have the effect of closing a significant number of the state's clinics. Melissa Block talks to Carrie Feibel of Houston Public Media.

When Michele Serros burst onto the literary scene in the 1990s, she was a new kind of Latina writer: She didn't speak much Spanish, she listened to ABBA and she was a vegan who liked to surf and skateboard. Her success as a writer, poet and comedic commentator made her an inspirational voice for Chicanas of her generation and beyond.

Serros, who Newsweek once hailed as a "Woman to Watch for the New Century," died of cancer Sunday at her home in Berkeley, Calif. She was 48 years old.

We're doing more and more things with our smartphones, so why not use them to store our driver's license? But when you think about it, you may not be comfortable handing your phone over to a police officer.

Motorists in Iowa may be among the first in the nation to be able to whip out their smartphones to access their licenses at traffic stops. The Iowa Department of Transportation is developing a smartphone app that would allow drivers to access a digitally encoded license that would take the place of the conventional plastic ID card.

Brain scans may soon be able to help predict a person's future — some aspects of it, anyway.

Information from these scans increasingly is able to suggest whether a child will have trouble with math, say, or whether someone with mental illness is going to respond to a particular treatment, according to a review of dozens of studies published Wednesday in the journal Neuron.

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