All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4:00PM-7:00PM

WEMU's All Things Considered local host is Lisa Barry who anchors all local news segments during the program.

NPR's All Things Considered paints the bigger picture with reports on the day's news, analysis of world events, and thoughtful commentary.

This week, Orlando Regional Medical Center released its last patient who was injured in the shooting at the gay nightclub Pulse in June.

A gunman killed 49 people and wounded 53, making it the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

Things are far from normal for people in Louisiana hit by last month's historic flood. Thousands have lost their homes, their cars, their jobs.

But one routine resumed this week in Baton Rouge: Students are back in class after a three-week interruption.

At Claiborne Elementary in north Baton Rouge, kids are tussling on school playgrounds again, even as their families' soaked belongings lay in heaps along neighborhood streets.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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89.1 WEMU

In this edition of Art and Soul, I am joined by the director of community engagement for the Ann Arbor Art Center, Omari Rush, and special guest Lynette Lao, president of the board for the Fly Children's Art Center in Ypsilanti.

"Fly" is designing one of the special pavilions that will be part of Pop-X running September 22nd to October 1st in Ann Arbor's Liberty Plaza.

Dozens of massive container ships are stranded at sea, looking for a place to dock after one of the world's largest shipping companies went bankrupt. Lars Jensen, the CEO of Sea Intelligence Consulting, which focuses on container shipping, says the container ships are operated by the South Korean-owned Hanjin Shipping company.

"It is some 85 to 90 vessels, and they really are scattered all over the world," he says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

9/11 Memorial
Wikipedia Media Commons / wikipedia.org

This Sunday marks the 15-year anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the United States.  The events of that fateful day still inform our lives today, and in a myriad of ways.  It has certainly spawned improvements to our security here in our community.


Conan Smith
Metro Matters

Washtenaw County's Board of Commissioners is holding a special meeting tonight to choose someone to complete the term of former commissioner Conan Smith.


Cash
Wikipedia Media Commons / wikipedia.org

A lawsuit says Michigan is short-changing local governments $4 billion dollars a year.  If it succeeds, it would blow a giant hole in the state budget and send legislators and state budget officials scrambling to find a fix. 


Fifteen years after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the World Trade Center is still one of the world's most scrutinized construction sites.

Developers have had to balance honoring the dead while reviving some of the most valuable real estate in the world.

The Dominican Republic has identified nearly 1,000 pregnant women suspected of being infected with the Zika virus. Haiti, which shares the same island, has identified only 22.

"There's no reason to believe that the mosquito will behave differently here [in Haiti] than in the Dominican Republic," says Dr. Jean Luc Poncelet, the World Health Organization's representative in Port-au-Prince.

It's a classic summertime treat, the kind you might get from an ice cream truck.

It's a sugar cone, in the shape of a taco, filled with light vanilla ice cream dipped in chocolate with nuts on top. It's the Choco Taco.

But where did this highly engineered dessert come from?

In the swing state of North Carolina, a fight for early voting rights that seemed to end with a strongly worded federal court ruling last month, may be just getting started.

That fight began in 2013, when the state made cuts to early voting, created a photo ID requirement and eliminated same-day registration, out-of-precinct voting, and pre-registration of high school students.

More than half of all voters there use early voting, and African-Americans do so at higher rates than whites. African-Americans also tend to overwhelmingly vote for Democrats.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Brazil is back in the sporting spotlight.

The Paralympic Games began with Wednesday's Opening Ceremony in Rio de Janeiro. There's been concern that budget cuts and slow ticket sales will mean a less-than-stellar Paralympics.

But organizers say there's been a late surge in ticket buying, and all countries eligible to compete are in Rio, after travel funds that had been delayed came through.

Marilyn Gouin / 89.1 WEMU

As a follow up to a community town hall meeting last July, the Washtenaw County Sheriff is planning a series of educational sessions for citizens to help keep them connected and informed.

At 4.9 percent, the nation's unemployment rate is half of what it was at the height of the Great Recession. But that number hides a big problem: Millions of men in their prime working years have dropped out of the workforce — meaning they aren't working or even looking for a job.

It's a trend that's held true for decades and has economists puzzled.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The parent company of Fox News has agreed to pay $20 million to settle a sexual harassment lawsuit against Roger Ailes, the channel's former chairman and CEO.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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We like to think all stories are equal. But our astrophysicist thinks we did not make a big-enough deal of what he thinks is a story so important it gives him chills. So here's last week's news through the misty eyes of NPR blogger Adam Frank.

The Pentagon press secretary, Peter Cook, walked into the Pentagon briefing room on the afternoon of Aug. 1 with an announcement: the U.S. had just launched airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Libya.

Reporters in the room jumped in with questions: Why now? What are the targets? What's the end goal? Finally, well into Cook's briefing, a reporter raised her hand and asked, under what legal authority were the strikes being conducted?

"Under the 2001 Authorization for the Military Force," Cook replied. "Similar to our previous airstrikes in Libya."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A2TC
Courtesy Photo / groundworkcenter.org

With the unofficial end of the summer travel season, plans are continuing to connect Ann Arbor with Northern Michigan by train.  


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