All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4:00PM-7:00PM

WEMU's All Things Considered local host is Lisa Barry who anchors all local news segments during the program.

NPR's All Things Considered paints the bigger picture with reports on the day's news, analysis of world events, and thoughtful commentary.

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It’s been a rough week for a lot of people as we continue to pick up the pieces from what is now being called a “once-in-a-century weather event.”


Power Lines
Wikipedia Media Commons / wikipedia.org

A storm that hammered the entire state with hurricane-force winds has left behind an unprecedented number of downed poles and power lines.  And that poses a new danger for people still without power with the onset of freezing temperatures. 

FOIA
State of Michigan / michigan.gov

A battle is brewing in the state legislature over government transparency for the governor and legislature.


Criminal Justice Bills Headed For Snyder’s Desk

Mar 10, 2017
Michigan House of Representatives
Wikipedia Media Commons / wikipedia.org

Michigan is on its way toward sweeping changes in its criminal justice system.  The State House passed a large package of legislation Wednesday. 


The most significant weather event DTE Energy has experienced in its more than 100-year history. That's how the utility is characterizing Wednesday's windstorm.  

The nation's roads, bridges, airports, water and transit systems are in pretty bad shape, according to the civil engineers who plan and design such infrastructure.

The new report card from the American Society of Civil Engineers gives the infrastructure of the United States a D-plus.

Earl Johnson II didn't grow up dreaming about becoming a famous singer: For a long time, he didn't even know he could sing. He discovered his talent almost by accident one night, at the recording studio he was working in as a producer.

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This week on Art & Soul, I am joined by Omari Rush from the Ann Arbor Art Center and Lisa Herbert Borgsdorf, manager of public programs for the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

We discuss the visual arts activities going on right now in the Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti areas.


Michigan Theater
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In this week's "Cinema Chat," WEMU's David Fair talks to Michigan Theater executive director Russ Collins about the movie business and all of the flicks coming to the big screen this weekend.  Plus, special guest Leslie Raymond offers a preview of the 2017 Ann Arbor Film Festival!


Rick Snyder
State of Michigan / michigan.gov

Governor Rick Snyder will create a commission this week that has the mission of tackling the problem of lead exposure.  A top administration official says the governor will also ask the Legislature to pass a law to make the commission permanent until the problem is solved.


Gun
Wikipedia Media Commons / wikipedia.org

A group of gun control advocates was at the state Capitol to lobby against a proposal to allow people to carry concealed weapons without a permit. 


Peter O'Connor / https://www.flickr.com/photos/anemoneprojectors/10624839095

Nearly a million Michigan residents lost power in yesterday’s wind storm.  At its peak, DTE Energy reported 700,000 customers without electricity in southeast Michigan. 

Now, it's no surprise that Neanderthals didn't brush their teeth. Nor did they go to the dentist.

That means bits of food and the microbes in their mouths just stayed stuck to their teeth. While not so good for dental hygiene, these dental plaques are a great resource for scientists interested in understanding more about Neanderthal diet and lifestyle.

Georgetown, Texas, is a conservative town in a conservative state. So it may come as something of a surprise that it's one of the first cities in America to be entirely powered by renewable energy.

Mayor Dale Ross, a staunch Republican who attended President Trump's inauguration, says that decision came down to a love of green energy and "green rectangles" — cash.

Ty Waters is an 11-year-old singer from Vancouver, Canada. His remarkable voice has won him recognition and opportunities from an appearance at the Apollo Theater in New York to the Music and Media Awards show in Hollywood. Now, he's released his debut album, titled Only Human.

As gun violence continues to plague some of Chicago's neighborhoods, a violence prevention program is looking to tackle the issue by treating it like a public health crisis.

Chicago's murder rate is below that of other cities, but the actual number of murders in the city last year — most from gun violence — exceeded the combined total of murders in New York City and Los Angeles.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

President Trump's repeated and unsubstantiated claims over the weekend that then-President Barack Obama had him wiretapped at Trump Tower at the height of last year's election season set off alarms in the corridors of power and also a constant refrain from lawmakers, former spymasters and journalists:

Where's your proof?

There are roughly 48,000 on-site septic systems in Washtenaw County, according to the Washtenaw County Environmental Health Division.  State statistics show that at any given time 10% of those systems are leaking and in need of repair.  In this week’s "Issues of the Environment," WEMU’s David Fair talks with Michigan Department of Environmental Quality’s David Cotton about the growing number of these systems and how to protect our land and waterways.


International Women's Day
Courtesy Photo / internationalwomensday.com

Today is International Women's Day, a day for worldwide reflections on the current state of women's rights and gender equality. 


Michigan Department of Education
State of Michigan / michigan.gov

There are fewer school districts in severe financial peril, according to a quarterly report compiled by the Michigan Department of Education.


An estimated 11 million immigrants live and work in the United States illegally. Their fate is one of the big policy questions facing the country. The story of how that population grew so large is a long one that's mostly about Mexico, and full of unintended consequences.

Prior to the 1920s, the U.S. had few restrictions on immigration, save for a few notable exclusions.

"Basically, people could show up," says Jeffrey Passel, of the Pew Research Center.

For workers in Mexico, crossing into the U.S. made a lot of economic sense, then and now.

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