All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4:00PM-7:00PM

WEMU's All Things Considered local host is Lisa Barry who anchors all local news segments during the program.

NPR's All Things Considered paints the bigger picture with reports on the day's news, analysis of world events, and thoughtful commentary.

A grand jury has indicted the Roman Catholic bishop of Kansas City for failing to report suspected child sexual abuse. Bishop Robert Finn has pleaded not guilty to a misdemeanor count of not reporting to police that a priest had child pornography on his computer.

U.S. Sends Troops To Uganda

Oct 14, 2011

President Obama told Congress he is sending troops to Uganda and neighboring country. The numbers aren't big: About a hundred American military advisers are going. But they have a significant job. They're tasked with helping African troops pursue members of the Lord's Resistance Army. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Michele Kelemen for more.

It's been a big year for Hollywood remakes — more than a dozen, not counting sequels. There were new versions of Conan the Barbarian and Arthur this summer. Fresh incarnations of Footloose and The Thing open today. And soon we'll see Hollywood's take on the Swedish hit The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. Cue the standard complaint: Hollywood has run out of ideas.

Hold on, though. Let's think this through.

Obama Pushes Free Trade Agenda In Detroit

Oct 14, 2011

President Obama was in Detroit Friday, selling his free trade agenda. He brought the message to an auto plant and brought along the South Korean president. Guy Raz talks to NPR's Ari Shapiro for more.

Convicted insider trader Raj Rajaratnam was sentenced to 11 years in prison Thursday. Rajaratnam was a founder of the Galleon Group hedge fund.

Robert Siegel speaks with Lucia Virostkova, a Slovak journalist based in Bratislava. She blogs for the EUobserver.com. She describes how the Slovakian parliamentary vote to join the eurozone bailout of banks brought the Slovakian government down — and caused the 2014 elections be moved to March.

Epstein Leaves Red Sox For Cubs

Oct 13, 2011

Boston Red Sox General Manager Theo Epstein is leaving his hometown team to take the reins of the Chicago Cubs. He departs after a disastrous season, but he will be remembered for making history. The youngest ever general manager in major league baseball designed the teams that won two World Series, Boston's first since 1918. Now he'll try to make Wrigley's loveable losers into champions.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, host: Next week, Israel and Hamas are expected to swap more than a thousand Palestinian prisoners for one captured Israeli soldier, Gilad Shalit. It will likely happen on Egyptian soil. Egypt helped broker the deal and had been working on it for the past couple of years. There were occasional reports of progress that didn't pan out.

So, how was it that success came through the new Egyptian military regime, which replaced Israel's old ally, Hosni Mubarak? And at a time when Israeli-Egyptian relations are worse than they've been in decades.

After a major service outage this week, Research In Motion, or RIM, the company that makes Blackberries, faces major problems. The outage, which left millions of customers all over the world without service for up to three days, comes on the heels of a tablet flop and an embarrassing role in this summer's U.K. riots. Guy Raz talks with Chip Cummins of the Wall Street Journal about the future of the company.

Hero Of Computer World Dennis Ritchie Dies

Oct 13, 2011

An unsung hero of the computer world has died. Dennis Ritchie created the C language — which is the foundation for most computers, including the iPad and iPhone.

'The Mountaintop' Opens On Broadway

Oct 13, 2011

Thursday is opening night for Katori Hall's Olivier Award-winning play about Martin Luther King Jr. and his encounter with a chamber maid in Memphis the night before his assassination. Starring Samuel L. Jackson and Angela Bassett, The Mountaintop is probably the most anticipated play of the fall season.

Many civilians have fled the fighting in the besieged Libyan city of Sirte in recent days and have ended up in a nearby village, which has one distinction: It's where deposed Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was born. But Sirte residents are not the only ones finding shelter there.

Taiwan might be known to most Americans for its export economy, but it's also been importing musical styles — from avant garde jazz to hip-hop. I first learned about Taiwan's thriving music scene from Joshua Samuel Brown. He's a travel writer who authored the last two editions of Lonely Planet: Taiwan.

Topeka, Kan., Repeals Domestic Violence Law

Oct 12, 2011

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ROBERT SIEGEL, host: This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

GUY RAZ, host: And I'm Guy Raz.

Gay Rights Movement Pioneer Dies

Oct 12, 2011

Frank Kameny, a pioneer in the gay rights movement, died Tuesday at 86. In 1957, Kameny was fired from his job as an astronomer for the U.S. government because he was homosexual. He fought his dismissal in court for years and in the 1960s, began picketing outside the White House, calling for equal rights for gays and lesbians. In 2009, the government issued him a formal apology for his firing.

A day after announcing they had uncovered an Iranian terror plot — the Obama administration is moving quickly to try to drum up more international pressure on the Iranian regime. But some Iran watchers are raising doubts about the US storyline — and wonder if the US can get the sort of diplomatic mileage it wants out of this case.

The parliament in Malta passed a controversial measure to expand Europe's bailout fund late on Monday. But to many young people in the tiny Mediterranean island nation, the question was never really in doubt. Despite all its economic problems, they see their future in the eurozone.

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GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Robert Siegel talks with NPR's Mara Liasson about Tuesday night's GOP presidential debate on the campus of Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H.

A Look At The NBA's Labor Troubles

Oct 11, 2011

Guy Raz talks with NPR sports correspondent Mike Pesca about the numbers behind the NBA's labor troubles.

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GUY RAZ, HOST:

For more on the alleged Iranian-backed plot, we're joined now by Richard Clarke, former top counterterrorism advisor to Presidents Clinton and George W. Bush. Richard Clarke, welcome.

Thank you, Guy.

The attorney general has alleged that this conspiracy was directed and approved by elements of the Iranian government. What does that mean to you?

Slovakia, the second poorest of the 17 nations that use the euro, has complicated plans to help Greece and other debt-ravaged countries. The Slovakian parliament was due to be the last to approve the expansion of the eurozone bailout fund. But internal divisions in the ruling coalition caused the government to collapse instead.

Greek Debt Crisis Leads To Dexia fail

Oct 11, 2011

Only a few months ago, the bank Dexia was rated one of the most stable in Europe. But, within the past few days, it's become the first casualty of the Greek debt crisis, saved only by interventions by the Belgian and French governments. Robert Siegel talks with Stanley Pignal, Brussels correspondent for the Financial Times, for more.

Israel, Hamas Agree To Prisoner Exchange

Oct 11, 2011

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Letters: Tim DeChristopher's River Trip

Oct 11, 2011

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And I'm Guy Raz. Our inbox was full of love for a story we aired yesterday. Alex Chadwick, a former colleague of ours, told us about his summer trip down the rapids of the Green and Colorado Rivers.

TIM DECHRISTOPHER: How do you think we should ride?

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Hey, diddle diddle. I mean...

DECHRISTOPHER: What does that mean?

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Right down the middle.

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