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89.1 WEMU presents Morning Edition from NPR.  David Fair, WEMU News Director,  keeps you up to date on all the latest news, traffic and weather in your neighborhood.  

NPR brings you news from around the country and the world.  Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne take you around the globe for the stories you'll be talking about all day.  While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host. 

WEMU features include Green Room, Issues of the Environment and Cinema Chat.  Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

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NPR Story
4:55 am
Tue July 3, 2012

100 Meter Runoff Canceled, Tarmoh Pulls Out Of Race

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 6:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The U.S. Olympic Track and Field trials soared to a start last month in Eugene, Oregon, with a world record in the decathlon. Yesterday, the trials limped to a controversial end. A planned 100 meter run-off was canceled between sprinters Allyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh after Tarmoh decided not to race.

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NPR Story
4:55 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Storm Leaves Illinois Residents Without Power

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 6:56 am

No power and high heat equal no fun in parts of Illinois. Some worry that July 4 celebrations will be affected.

NPR Story
4:55 am
Tue July 3, 2012

The History Of Pie

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 2:11 pm

It's Pie Week on Morning Edition, and we wanted to know more about where pie comes from. Linda Wertheimer talks to food anthropologist Deborah Duchon about the history of pie.

NPR Story
4:55 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 7:53 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with another bye-bye at Barclays.

Business
4:49 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Airbus: 'The Time Is Right' To Open Alabama Plant

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 5:31 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Jobs and the economy are big issues in this election. And from Alabama, we have a story of jobs coming from overseas to the U.S. European aircraft manufacturer Airbus is making a bold move into North America to compete in the largest market in the world for passenger jets.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The firm will build its first U.S. assembly plant on the Gulf Coast in Mobile, Alabama. NPR's Debbie Elliott reports the region has been working for years to attract Airbus.

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NPR Story
4:49 am
Tue July 3, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 8:02 am

In France, a law just took effect that requires all drivers, including tourists, to buy a breathalyzer test to keep in their cars. Drunk driving is huge problem in France — causing more accidents per year than speeding. It was recently discovered that the head of the group that lobbied for the law also works for a company that makes the kits.

NPR Story
4:49 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Examining Storm Damage In Virginia

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 6:51 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

People in states from the Midwest to the Atlantic are still dealing with the damage and power outages from Friday night's derecho. That's the name for the line of storms which swept through with shearing winds and intense lightening. Chicago was among the cities hit by a second severe storm on Sunday. We'll get an update from there in a moment.

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Middle East
3:31 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Can Sanctions Force Iran To Change Its Policies?

Iranian workers make repairs to a unit at Tehran's oil refinery in November 2007. It's estimated that a Western oil embargo is costing Iran about $4.5 billion each month in lost revenue.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 8:17 am

Whether economic sanctions can force a government to change course is far from clear, but Iran should be a good test case.

A European Union embargo on Iranian oil took full effect this week, complementing U.S. measures that have grown much more severe in recent weeks. Other Western sanctions now in place target Iranian banks, foreign companies that provide shipping insurance for Iranian oil tankers, and foreign firms that invest in the Iranian oil industry.

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Science
3:30 am
Tue July 3, 2012

When Ice Cream Attacks: The Mystery Of Brain Freeze

NPR interns (from left) Angela Wong and Kevin Uhrmacher participate in an experiment to induce brain freeze.
Benjamin Morris NPR

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 2:12 pm

If it hasn't happened to you, count yourself as lucky. For many people, eating ice cream or drinking an icy drink too fast can produce a really painful headache. It usually hits in the front of the brain, behind the forehead.

The technical name for this phenomenon is cold-stimulus headache, but people also refer to it as "ice cream headache" or "brain freeze."

The good news is that brain freeze is easy to prevent — just eat more slowly. The other bit of good news is these headaches don't last very long — a minute at the outside.

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Space
3:28 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Fledgling NASA Nonprofit Starts To Liftoff

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 10:24 am

A new nonprofit organization that's supposed to take charge of expanding scientific research on the International Space Station has had a rocky first year but now is starting to show what it can do.

The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space just signed one agreement with a company not traditionally linked to research in space: the sporting goods company Cobra Puma Golf.

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Asia
3:18 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Cheered In Europe, Suu Kyi Faces Crises In Myanmar

Rohingya Muslims, trying to cross the Naf river into Bangladesh to escape sectarian violence in Myanmar, look on from an intercepted boat in Teknaf, June 13. The plight of the Rohingya minority is one of the tests Suu Kyi faces at home.
Munir Uz Zaman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 10:23 am

There are few opposition leaders who are welcomed abroad with the same pomp and ceremony as heads of state. But that's the sort of star treatment lavished on Aung San Suu Kyi, opposition leader of Myanmar, also known as Burma, on her three-week tour of Europe.

But pressure is increasing on her to address simmering political crises at home, and to move her country's democratic changes forward.

In Geneva, Oslo, Dublin, London and Paris, Suu Kyi issued eloquent pleas for ethical foreign investment in Myanmar and foreign support for her country's ongoing reforms.

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Asia
9:40 am
Mon July 2, 2012

'Political Crisis' Faces Hong Kong's New Leader

Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying and his wife, Regina, shake hands with supporters Sunday during a flag-raising ceremony to mark the 15th anniversary of Hong Kong's handover to China. Leung was sworn in as Hong Kong's third leader amid growing discontent with China's rule over the Asian financial center.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 12:36 pm

It's a pretty bad first day at work when hundreds of thousands of people march through the streets calling for your resignation. That's what happened Sunday to Hong Kong's new leader, Leung Chun-ying, who was appointed by Beijing. The huge turnout presents new problems for China amid its own difficult power transition.

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Around the Nation
7:35 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Art Thief Returns Stolen Salvador Dali Drawing

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Analysis
7:23 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Democrats, GOP Say Health Ruling Works For Them

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Members of Congress have left town for the Fourth of July recess, but Washington is still reacting to the Supreme Court decision upholding President Obama's health care law. Each party is looking for ways to use the decision to its advantage in the fall campaign. Going into the weekend, a Gallup poll showed voters evenly split; 46 percent said they approved of the ruling, 46 percent disapprove.

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Around the Nation
7:23 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Daredevils Try Out Adult-Size Hot Wheels Track

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Hot Wheels and their twisty plastic tracks have long been a source of small scale thrills. But on Saturday, daredevils Tanner Foust and Greg Tracy went behind the miniature. They raced two rally cars around a 66-foot tall version of a Hot Wheels loop-de-loop racetrack. Seven times gravity was the hardest part. The only thing broken was a world record. Don't try this at home. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Health Care
5:23 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Advocates Worry Texas Won't Expand Medicaid

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 7:15 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Texas, one in four people are uninsured, and the state's leadership has been vociferous in its opposition to the health-care law. Carrie Feibel, of member station KUHF in Houston, reports that despite the Supreme Court's ruling, political opposition to the Affordable Care Act remains strong. And that leaves many public-health advocates nervous about how the Lone Star State will implement the law.

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Health Care
5:21 am
Mon July 2, 2012

California Proceeds With Health Exchanges

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 7:23 am

Transcript

PAULINE BARTOLONE, BYLINE: I'm Pauline Bartolone in Sacramento.

California, unlike Mississippi, is already on the road to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. And after the law passed in 2010, it was the first state to get going to build an exchange.

Peter Lee is in charge of it. He never let uncertainty about the Supreme Court decision come in the way of building the new marketplace.

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Business
4:54 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 7:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The chairman of the big British bank Barclays stepped down this morning. This comes just days after the bank agreed to pay British and U.S. regulators a total of $450 million, a fine to settle charges that Barclays' traders and executives had manipulated a key interest rate for profit.

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Around the Nation
4:54 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Fly Fishermen Benefit From Low Stream Levels

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 7:23 am

One of Colorado's recreational industries is experiencing an early season boon because of this year's low snowpack and ever-worsening drought. Fly fishing enthusiasts are loving the low stream levels, and fly shops are filled with customers. From Aspen Public Radio, Luke Runyon reports.

Sports
4:51 am
Mon July 2, 2012

100 Meters Runoff To Decide 3rd Place Finisher

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 7:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The 100 meters is the fastest running event in Olympic track and field. But for the last nine days, the women's 100 at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field trials in Eugene, Oregon has been stalled by a much talked about tie. Today, finally, a resolution. Sprinters Alyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh will race in a run-off to break their tie for third place in the 100 they first ran two Saturday's ago. First one to cross the finish line today makes the U.S. women's 100 team. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins us to talk about this.

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Business
4:51 am
Mon July 2, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 7:07 am

More than 70 years ago, Samsung started as a company which sold dried fish and fruit. Now Samsung sells everything from life insurance, to hotels and chemicals. It's one of South Korea's biggest companies. And, it's still run by the same family: the Lees.

Science
3:35 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Is The Hunt For The 'God Particle' Finally Over?

This image, from a sensor at the particle accelerator at CERN, is an example of the data signature a Higgs particle might generate.
CERN

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 9:17 am

Before we get to the fireworks on the Fourth of July, we might see some pyrotechnics from a giant physics experiment near Geneva, Switzerland.

Scientists there are planning to gather that morning to hear the latest about the decades-long search for a subatomic particle that could help explain why objects in our universe actually weigh anything.

The buzz is that they're closing in on the elusive Higgs particle. That would be a major milestone in the quest to understand the most basic nature of the universe.

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Crime In The City
3:33 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Philly Author's 'Confession': I Lived These Stories

Author Solomon Jones bases his work on his own experiences on the streets of Philadelphia.
Milton Perry

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 4:49 pm

Philadelphia may be called the City of Brotherly Love, but author Solomon Jones sees the sadder, more complex side of the city.

Jones' books feature Philly police detective Mike Coletti. When we meet him in The Last Confession, he's on the verge of retirement, but before he can head off into the sunset, he's got to confront some demons from his past and catch a serial killer calling himself the Angel of Death.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:31 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Organ Donation Has Consequences Some Donors Aren't Prepared For

Most living kidney donors return to their daily lives in a matter of weeks, but for some, unforeseen physical and financial complications arise.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 11:44 am

Nearly a year and a half ago, Jeff Moyer donated a kidney. It's something he says changed his life forever. "Transplant surgery is a miracle," marvels Moyer. "I mean, to think that my kidney saved someone else's life — that's staggeringly wonderful."

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Business
7:30 am
Fri June 29, 2012

Ogilvy's Longtime Chairman To Step Down

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Our last word in business today comes from a giant in the advertising industry. Her name is Shelly Lazarus. The Brooklyn native began working at the ad agency Ogilvy and Mather at a time when the industry looked much like the one portrayed in the TV show "Mad Men."

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

An industry run mostly by men. It was 1971 when Shelly Lazarus arrived at the company, fresh from Columbia University, with an MBA - a time when few women were earning business degrees.

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