Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00am-9:00am

89.1 WEMU presents Morning Edition from NPR.  David Fair, WEMU News Director,  keeps you up to date on all the latest news, traffic and weather in your neighborhood.  

NPR brings you news from around the country and the world.  Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne take you around the globe for the stories you'll be talking about all day.  While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host. 

WEMU features include Green Room, Issues of the Environment and Cinema Chat.  Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

During World War One, German troops stole a painting from a French museum. Nearly a century later, "A Fisherman's Daughter" by French artist Jules Breton has been returned to the government of France.

Annie Leibovitz has shot some of the world's most famous portraits — from John Lennon to President Obama. And yet she risked losing ownership of her works to pay off a loan. That was 2009. Leibovitz says she's learned her lesson and is on better financial footing. She's opened a new exhibit in Russia.

Business News

Oct 14, 2011

Steve Inskeep has business news.

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney took on U.S. trade policy during a speech yesterday at the Microsoft campus in Redmond, Washington. From member station KUOW in Seattle, Amy Radil reports.

The Last Word In Business

Oct 14, 2011

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

Alabama business owners are furious about the state's new immigration law. They say it is costing them business. Some wonder if the state will ultimately change the law, which is leading legal and illegal immigrants to flee the state.

Scott Simon To Interview Herman Cain

Oct 14, 2011

Steve Inskeep has a preview of Scott Simon's upcoming interview with Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain.

Raj Rajaratnam was once one of the wealthiest hedge fund managers in the world. Now, the former billionaire and Galleon Group co-founder faces 11 years in prison for his role in an insider trading case. A judge in Manhattan handed out the sentence Thursday morning.

Runner Confesses To Bus Ride During Race

Oct 13, 2011

Rob Sloan finished third in a marathon outside New Castle, England. Spectators saw him running through bushes and jumping on a public bus.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's some other news we are following. The Occupy Wall Street protests have made news around the world including the state-run media in Syria. Syria, facing its own protests, is highlighting American dissatisfaction and now the U.S. Embassy in Syria has responded on its Facebook page.

Business News

Oct 13, 2011

Steve Inskeep has business news.

The Last Word In Business

Oct 13, 2011

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

These improvements in smartphones bring us to our last word in business: enhance it. It's a scene from countless movies and TV shows, computer experts race to analyze a blurry photograph to find a clue to catch the bad guy.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Enhance it.

U.S. authorities have charged two Iranians in a plot to kill a Saudi envoy. Steve Inskeep talks to David Ignatius, a best-selling novelist and foreign policy columnist for "The Washington Post," and to Karim Sadjadpour, an expert on Iran and the Middle East with the Carnegie Endowment, about the plot which sounds like it came out of a spy novel.

Republican donor Ray Washburne was a major contributor to George W. Bush's presidential campaign, and he was the national finance chairman for Tim Pawlenty. But when Pawlenty pulled out of the presidential race, Washburne tells Steve Inskeep that it took some time before deciding to back Mitt Romney's campaign.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Rebel fighters now control most of Moammar Gadhafi's hometown. They blasted their way into Sirte during one of the bloodiest battles of Libyan civil war with civilians caught in the middle and accusations of brutality on both sides. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro was in Sirte yesterday. And we advise you that some people will find the details of her four-minute report disturbing.

The Sinai Peninsula has proven a major security headache for Egypt's military rulers since a popular uprising ousted President Hosni Mubarak eight months ago.

Gunmen who crossed over the border into Israel from southern Sinai killed eight civilians in August. In northern Sinai, unknown assailants have repeatedly attacked a natural gas pipeline feeding Israel and Jordan.

But what ultimately may prove more problematic for Egyptian authorities is the growing number of northern Sinai residents who are arming themselves with heavy weapons coming in from Libya.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Turns out it's one thing for Italy's prime minister to live a scandalous private life, it's another to do that during a major economic crisis. Silvio Berlusconi is fighting for the survival of his center-right government and he faces growing discontent within his own party over his lifestyle and judicial woes. Berlusconi's called today for a vote of confidence in Italy's parliament. That vote is expected tomorrow. And as NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports, Berlusconi's political test comes as Italy is engulfed in the eurozone debt crisis.

Fifty years ago, a new phrase began to make its way into American conversations: "Catch-22." Joseph Heller's irreverent World War II novel — named for the now-famous paradox — was published on Oct. 11, 1961. His take on war meshed perfectly with the anti-authoritarian generation that came of age in the 1960s. And now, a half-century later, the predicament of a no-win trap still resonates with a new crop of young people distrustful of their elders.

Corn Maze Baffles Family Of Four

Oct 12, 2011

Bob Connors tells the Boston Globe he designed the seven-acre maze in Danvers, Mass., so people would get lost. Apparently it worked because a family of four became completely disoriented. In a final act of desperation, they called 911 from inside the maze.

In 1887, the French-made motor car La Marquise was in the first automobile race. It is still running. The car got a standing ovation when it was driven onstage at a recent auction, and a winning bid of more than $4.5 million.

Business News

Oct 12, 2011

Renee Montagne has business news.

The Last Word In Business

Oct 12, 2011

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's remember, now, a pioneer for gay rights. Yesterday, on National Coming Out Day, Frank Kameny died.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Mr. Kameny fought in World War II. He earned a PhD from Harvard. He landed a job with the U.S. Army Map Service. And then, in 1957, he was fired for being gay. Frank Kameny sued, and lost, and appealed, and lost. But this was still a landmark case. It was the first federal civil rights claim based on sexual orientation. He also organized a group called the Homophiles.

Fact Checking: Latest GOP Debate

Oct 12, 2011

Steve Inskeep and Bill Adair, editor of the non-partisan fact-checking web site Politifact.com, truth squad the latest Republican presidential debate held last night in Hanover, New Hampshire.

U.S.: Iran Behind Plot To Kill Saudi Envoy

Oct 12, 2011

Steve Inskeep talks with Iran expert Ray Takeyh of the Council on Foreign Relations about the criminal charges filed yesterday against two Iranians — one a naturalized U.S. citizen — accused of plotting to kill the Saudi Ambassador to Washington.

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