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89.1 WEMU presents Morning Edition from NPR.  David Fair, WEMU News Director,  keeps you up to date on all the latest news, traffic and weather in your neighborhood.  

NPR brings you news from around the country and the world.  Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne take you around the globe for the stories you'll be talking about all day.  While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host. 

WEMU features include Green Room, Issues of the Environment and Cinema Chat.  Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Thomas Sargent of New York University and Christopher A. Sims of Princeton University have won the Nobel Prize in economics. They won for their research on macroeconomics.

Renee Montagne talks to sociologist Ruben Rumbaut, co-author of a landmark longitudinal study of children of immigrants, about whether young Latinos are truly bicultural.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Violence in Cairo over the weekend reminds us that Egypt is mostly Muslim but not entirely so. Several million Egyptians are Coptic Christians. And it was members of that minority group who clashed with Egypt's military or the weekend. At least two dozen people are dead, hundreds wounded, the worst violence since Hosni Mubarak was driven from power in February.

The title of Bjork's new album came to her after she read a book by neurologist Oliver Sachs about the mind's empathy for music.

"He called it 'musicophilia,' she says. "Obviously, I make music, but I wanted to do a project about nature. So I thought, if I call it Biophilia, it's sort of empathy with nature."

So there are song titles like "Solstice," "Dark Matter" and "Crystalline." The lyrics actually touch on processes in nature — for instance, how crystals grow.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host: Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

If you don't already find wax museums a bit creepy, this might convince you. NFL star Troy Polamalu is famous for his long, black curls. And it's quite plausible he would be among the lifelike statues in Hollywood's Madam Tussauds. So when visitors sidled up for a souvenir photo with the wax figure in a Steelers jersey, they got a shock. It was alive. It was Polamalu in the flesh shooting a commercial and playing a prank. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The bridge was stolen sometime between Sept. 27 and Oct. 5. Police suspect thieves dismantled it to sell as scrap metal. It was made of corrugated steel valued at about $100,000.

GOP presidential contender Mitt Romney travels to the Citadel in South Carolina to deliver a speech on national security Friday. The issue has traditionally been a bright line between hawks and doves, Republicans and Democrats. But even on this, the third anniversary of President Obama winning the Nobel Peace Prize, the politics are no longer clear cut.

Loosely-organized protests that began on Wall Street last month have now spread to other cities across the country. President Obama says he understands the frustration conveyed by prostesters. He's trying to channel public anger with Wall Street into support for his own financial policies.

Apple's Steve Jobs, who died this week after battling a rare form of pancreatic cancer, didn't just change technology. Lynn Neary learns more about the profound legacy Jobs leaves behind on the world of design from John Maeda, president of the Rhode Island School of Design.

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LYNN NEARY, host: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary. Steve Inskeep is away.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: And I'm Renee Montagne.

When the U.S. tracked down and killed Osama bin Laden in his hiding place in northwest Pakistan, it chose to keep the Pakistani army and its intelligence service in the dark about that mission. The fact that Pakistan was caught with the world's most wanted man living within walking distance of a premiere military academy humiliated and angered many in the country.

Mortgage Rates Hit Record Low

Oct 7, 2011

Mortgage rates are now below 4 percent. The average 30 year fixed rate loan is at an all time low. But high unemployment, weak consumer confidence, and tougher standards for getting credit, are keeping many Americans from buying homes.

Banks To Raise Debit Card Fees

Oct 7, 2011

Lynn Neary talks to Ron Lieber, personal finance columnist for "The New York Times," about debit card fees.

Thriller writer Barry Eisler has turned his back on traditional publishing — or as he calls it, legacy publishing. His latest book, The Detachment, was released as an e-book in September. It comes out in paperback in October. Both versions are published by Amazon.

As a child growing up on his family's farm in the 1980s, Jere Gettle didn't spend his evenings watching TV; instead, he read seed catalogs. To him, the endless varieties of seeds with exotic sounding names were full of possibility. He loved the idea of planting them in the ground, tending the crops that grew from them and preparing the harvested vegetables for a family meal.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

President Obama sought this morning to put his proposal to create American jobs at the top of Congress' to-do list. The president has traveled the country in recent weeks, trying to rally public support for his $447 billion plan. And today, he held a press conference at the White House.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: And the reason I keep going around the country talking about this jobs bill is because people really need help right now. Our economy really needs a jolt right now.

Horshack Move Banned At British School

Oct 6, 2011

Teachers say the new method of giving thumbs up has a calming effect, and makes it easier not to overlook students who don't want to draw attention to themselves. The new method is more like The Fonz on Happy Days and less like Arnold Horshack on Welcome Back Kotter.

The Philadelphia Phillies played the St. Louis Cardinals Wednesday night, and for the second straight game a squirrel stole the show. This time the creature darted in front of the batter's box and dashed into the stands at Busch Stadium. The Cardinals' 5-3 victory was celebrated on Twitter by a new user called @BuschSquirrel.

Belgium has spent 16 months struggling to form a federal government. Observers say that issue is a microcosm of the financial crisis that has hit the eurozone.

Pixar computer-generated animation kicked off a renaissance in animated films — including blockbusters Toy Story, Finding Nemo and Wall-E. After Steve Jobs left Appple in 1985, he bought Pixar from George Lucas. In 2006, Jobs sold Pixar to Disney.

Former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie announced this week they would not be seeking the Republican presidential nomination. Among the most enthusiastic advocates of a Christie presidential bid were a handful of Northeastern investors. Some of them have already jumped to join Mitt Romney.

Thousands of protesters filled the streets of Manhattan's financial district Wednesday night. They came to show support for Occupy Wall Street, a demonstration that is now in its third week. Some of the marchers represented labor unions and other organizations, but many were just ordinary New Yorkers who came to voice their support for the populist protest.

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LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Hundreds of bloggers from across the Arab world are meeting in Tunis, Tunisia, this week to discuss cyber-activism and political change. This is their third annual gathering, and it follows a dramatic year since Arab uprisings began last December. Saudi blogger Ahmed Al Omran, an NPR social media intern, talks to Renee Montagne about the role bloggers played in inspiring change.

A federal judge has ruled that Alabama's strict immigration laws will go forward even as appeals are made through the judicial system. Hispanic-owned businesses in the state say their customers have vanished. Among other things, the new law requires police to verify the immigrations status of suspects if there's "reasonable suspicion" they are in the country illegally.

Egypt, 30 Years After Anwar Sadat's Death

Oct 6, 2011

Lynn Neary talks to Steven Cook, senior follow for Middle Eastern studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, about the 30th anniversary of the assassination of former Egyptian President Anwar Sadat. They discuss how the past is shaping Egypt's future.

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