Black History Month

Laura Bien

The Ypsilanti District Library has launched a new African-American Oral History Archive.  The audio is being taken from old cassette tapes.

Washtenaw County

To wrap-up our Black History Month coverage, we spoke with Eastern Michigan University professor of Africology and African-American Studies, Ronald Woods.

Hosted by Noah Adams, this program chronicles the idealistic artists, uncompromising personalities, and powerful music of the era, and looks at how these forces combined to turn abolitionism from a scorned fringe movement into a nation-changing force. Listen live on WEMU Friday, February 22 at 9am for special Black History Month coverage on WEMU.

“Any good crusade requires singing,” reformers like to say, and in the 19th Century, no cause was more righteous than in the decades-long crusade to abolish slavery."

Heavenly Sight

Feb 11, 2013

A surprising number of blind African American singers came from the gospel tradition to influence not just sacred music, but blues, bluegrass, and popular music up to and beyond rock and roll.  Host David Marash brings us the stories, music, and insight from the blind gospel tradition that transformed American song and gave it soul. Friday, February 15 at 9am on WEMU.  This program features the Blind Boys of Alabama, Arizona Dranes, Blind Willie Johnson, Ray Charles,  and the Reverend Gary Davis.

Join host Maya Angelou on 89.1 WEMU Friday, February 8, at 9am. Angelou poetically and historically covers milestones by African Americans in Nobel Peace Prize, Grammy, Academy Awards, and cultural awards.