Detroit Institute of Arts

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Detroit's emergency manager is praising workers and retirees who approved pension cuts as a way to get the city out of bankruptcy. 

Results filed late Monday show the changes were endorsed by a landslide.

The tally gives the city a boost as Judge Steven Rhodes determines whether Detroit's overall strategy to scrub billions in debt is fair and feasible to all creditors.

Trial starts Aug. 14. Emergency manager Kevyn Orr says retirees made an "informed, positive decision."

Wikipedia

Detroit due to report results from pension vote   The city of Detroit is expected to report the results of voting on pension cuts by retirees and former and current workers. The outcome will have an impact on the city's bankruptcy case, which goes to trial on August. 14th.

Wikipedia

An effort by deep-pocketed philanthropists to save the bankrupt city of Detroit's art treasures culminated today when Michigan Governor Rick Snyder authorized $195 million in state help. The bill signing in Detroit was part of what's dubbed the Grand Bargain. The deal also includes $366 million from foundations and a $100 million fundraising pledge by the Detroit Institute of Arts.

Wikipedia

Detroit City Council has reaffirmed its approval to move artwork threatened by the city's bankruptcy into a charitable trust. 

The Detroit Institute of Arts
Michael Barera / Wikimedia Commons

General Motors, Ford and Chrysler are stepping into Detroit's bankruptcy picture by pledging $26 million to help support retiree pensions while keeping the city's art treasures off the auction block.

The Detroit Institute of Arts, Gov. Rick Snyder and representatives from the automakers announced the donation Monday at the art museum.

Cinetopia starts tonight in Ann Arbor with screenings of “1982,” “The Skeleton Twins” & John Sayles’ “Go For Sisters!”

Jason Mrachina / Flickr.com

Valuable art is back on the docket in Detroit's bankruptcy case. 

Wikipedia

Chrysler, Ford Motor and General Motors are interested in preserving art and shoring up pensions in Detroit's bankruptcy case.  

 

     

Wikipedia

Detroit's latest plan to get out of bankruptcy includes a lump-sum payment of about $195 million from the state to shore up pensions and prevent the sale of city-owned art. 

Lead in text: 

Some bankruptcy experts said that it now appears increasingly unlikely that creditors will be able to get their hands on the city-owned art collection at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

Snyder announces plan to shield DIA assets from Detroit bankruptcy

By Rick Pluta

Governor Rick Snyder has proposed committing up to $350 million to help mitigate cuts to Detroit pension benefits – as well as keep assets of the Detroit Institute of Arts off the auction block.

The state’s offer would play out over 20 years and would match money raised from private donations to make sure DIA paintings, sculptures, and other works of art don’t get sold off to pay pension benefits that are central to the bankruptcy negotiations.

Cinema Chat: Cinetopia, Whiskey and Fast Cars!

May 23, 2013

On this week's edition of "Cinema Chat"  WEMU's David Fair has a different co-host. While Russ Collins spent the morning toiling elsewhere, Michigan Theater Program Director Amanda Bynum filled in to provide all of the movie information you'll need.

This spring, some classic pieces of art will be coming to downtown Ann Arbor.   It's the Detroit Institute of Art's 'Inside Out' program.   Hear more from WEMU's Andrew Cluley.