Dr. Adam Marks
Courtest photo / University of Michigan

Eastern Michigan University's Aging Studies Program is having a special program Wednesday October 28th featuring a lecture by Dr. Adam Marks, Clinical assistant professor in the division of geriatrics and palliative medicine at the University of Michigan. He will be speaking on how  Americans deal with death, and  how that has changed over the past 100 years.

Project Healthy Schools

A new study conducted by the University of Michigan revealed that children's health can improve if they are taught about healthy habits early in life.

1,5000 middle school students in Washtenaw County took part in a seven year study called Project Healthy Schools.

For the first three years, the students were taught how to eat healthy and exercise.  Four years after completing the health lessons, those same students had lower levels of cholesterol and triglycerides.

The state will request a crucial waiver on Tuesday needed to prevent hundreds of thousands of Michiganders from losing their health insurance.

Intensive End-Of-Life Care On The Rise For Cancer Patients

Jul 22, 2015

Conversations about end-of-life care are difficult. But even though most people now take some steps to communicate their wishes, many may still receive more intensive care than they would have wished, a study published in July found.

People interested in cutting through all the information and misinformation about healthcare reform can turn to an online class from the University of Michigan. U of M is offering a free online class to help everyone get a better understanding of US health care reforms

WEMU's Andrew Cluley has more on the Understanding and Improving the US Healthcare System class:

The Medicaid expansion bill signed into law by Gov. Snyder earlier this week will have a major impact on health care in Washtenaw County. 

Both it and the upcoming state health insurance marketplace will affect many of the people already receiving coverage through the Washtenaw Health Plan. Many people currently receiving health coverage through the Washtenaw Health Plan will lose that coverage and be required to get it instead through either the newly expanded Medicaid or the upcoming health insurance marketplace.

Krista Nordberg is the Director of Enrollment and Advocacy at Washtenaw Health Plan. She says there will likely be timing issues with these changes.

The Washtenaw Health Plan helps people get the health care services they need, like doctor and clinic visits, outpatient lab and X-ray tests, prescriptions, hospitalization and mental health services.

You can learn more at their website: