healthcare

The brilliantly-colored shapes reminded Carol Vincent of fluorescent deep-sea creatures, and they floated past her languidly. She was overwhelmed by their beauty — and then suddenly, as if in a dream, she was out somewhere in deep space instead. "Oh, wow," she thought, overwhelmed all over again. She had been an amateur skydiver in her youth, but this sensation didn't come with any sense of speeding or falling or even having a body at all. She was just hovering there, gazing at the universe.

If you're curious about what people really think about some of the hottest of hot-button food controversies, the Pew Research Center has just the thing for you: a survey of attitudes toward genetic modification, organic food and the importance of eating healthfully.

The survey results are published in a 99-page report that can keep you occupied for days. But if you're pressed for time, here are some of the most interesting highlights that caught our eye.

The young women in this story have labels. Three labels: Single, mother, college student. They're raising a child and getting an education — three of the 2.6 million unmarried parents attending U.S. colleges and universities.

Getting a degree is hard enough for anyone, but these students face extra challenges. And when it comes to helping out with their needs, Wilson College in Chambersburg, Pa., is considered one of the best in the country.

Poverty was one of the forgotten issues on the campaign trail this election season. Now, many who work with the nation's poor worry that it will be even more forgotten under a Trump administration and the new Republican Congress.

San Francisco Bay Area companies say Sutter Health is strong-arming them into a contract that would help the hospital system secure its power over prices and potentially raise the cost of medical care for their employees in the future.

There are rating systems for hospitals, nursing homes and doctors. So why is it so hard to compare providers of child care?

Part of the reason is that there are no nationally agreed-upon standards for what determines the quality of child care. The standards that do exist are formulated in each state, and they vary widely.

For example, some states require that child care workers have a teaching certificate. Others require certain college courses. Some have strict ratios of how many caregivers are required per child.

test tubes
Creative Commons

 

Researchers at the University of Michigan have made an important breakthrough in the fight for new antibiotics.

Dr. Adam Marks
Courtest photo / University of Michigan

Eastern Michigan University's Aging Studies Program is having a special program Wednesday October 28th featuring a lecture by Dr. Adam Marks, Clinical assistant professor in the division of geriatrics and palliative medicine at the University of Michigan. He will be speaking on how  Americans deal with death, and  how that has changed over the past 100 years.

Project Healthy Schools

A new study conducted by the University of Michigan revealed that children's health can improve if they are taught about healthy habits early in life.

1,5000 middle school students in Washtenaw County took part in a seven year study called Project Healthy Schools.

For the first three years, the students were taught how to eat healthy and exercise.  Four years after completing the health lessons, those same students had lower levels of cholesterol and triglycerides.

The state will request a crucial waiver on Tuesday needed to prevent hundreds of thousands of Michiganders from losing their health insurance.

Intensive End-Of-Life Care On The Rise For Cancer Patients

Jul 22, 2015

Conversations about end-of-life care are difficult. But even though most people now take some steps to communicate their wishes, many may still receive more intensive care than they would have wished, a study published in July found.

www.coursera.org/umich

People interested in cutting through all the information and misinformation about healthcare reform can turn to an online class from the University of Michigan. U of M is offering a free online class to help everyone get a better understanding of US health care reforms

WEMU's Andrew Cluley has more on the Understanding and Improving the US Healthcare System class:


The Medicaid expansion bill signed into law by Gov. Snyder earlier this week will have a major impact on health care in Washtenaw County. 

Both it and the upcoming state health insurance marketplace will affect many of the people already receiving coverage through the Washtenaw Health Plan. Many people currently receiving health coverage through the Washtenaw Health Plan will lose that coverage and be required to get it instead through either the newly expanded Medicaid or the upcoming health insurance marketplace.


Krista Nordberg is the Director of Enrollment and Advocacy at Washtenaw Health Plan. She says there will likely be timing issues with these changes.
 

The Washtenaw Health Plan helps people get the health care services they need, like doctor and clinic visits, outpatient lab and X-ray tests, prescriptions, hospitalization and mental health services.


You can learn more at their website: www.ewashtenaw.org