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Governor Rick Snyder issued his 2014 State of the State Address Thursday, January 17, 2014 and 89.1 WEMU carried it live as a partnership with Michigan Public Radio Network.  This is their coverage of the event and the Democratic response.  

SEE ALSO: Washtenaw County Lawmakers Respond to Governor Rick Snyder's State of State Address

Lead in text: 

An opportunity to hear Henry Belafonte's work first hand at the Ross School of Business keynote lecture during the University of Michigan’s 28th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Symposium on Monday, Jan. 20 at 10 a.m. in Hill Auditorium.

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Michigan legislative budget experts say state government is taking in hundreds of millions of dollars more than expected eight months ago.

A report released Tuesday from the House Fiscal Agency in Lansing estimates Michigan collected $433 million more than projected in the last budget year and will collect about $327 million more this year.

The estimates are similar to ones given in December by the Senate Fiscal Agency. All told, lawmakers could have $1.1 billion to $1.3 billion more to work with than expected in May.

Legislators will meet Friday to get a consensus estimate on revenues. They're already talking about cutting taxes, though Gov. Rick Snyder has held off on calling for tax relief.

Next month, he will propose a budget for the fiscal year starting this October.

Courtesty Victor Shendel / National Wildlife Federation

A new report from the National Wildlife Federation outlines the effects of climate change for Michigan's big game animals and their habitat. 

The report says deer, moose, and elk experience dire repercussions from human-induced climate change. 

Christopher Hoving is the Wildlife Adaptation Specialist at the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. He says that a decrease of snowfall will affect the deer population locally and regionally.

Hoving also says that the disease Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease, or EHD, found in white tailed deer, is more common thanks to longer summers and warmer winters. 

From the report:

Nowhere to Run takes a comprehensive look at the best available science on climate change’s impacts on big game, covering moose, mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk, pronghorn, bighorn sheep and black bears. The most significant effects include:

  • Heat: Moose can become heat-stressed in warm weather, especially in summer if temperatures climb above 60 to70 degrees when moose coats are thinner. Heat stress leads to lower weights, declining pregnancy rates and increased vulnerability to predators and disease. Because of warmer fall and winter temperatures, black bears are already more active than usual during times when they normally conserve energy through hibernation, pushing fat stores to the limit.
  • Drought: More droughts have reduced aspen forests in the west, a favorite elk habitat, and many elk are not migrating as much as they traditionally have. Increasing periods of drought, more invasive plants and wildfires will alter sagebrush and grassland ecosystems, favored pronghorn habitats.
  • Parasites and disease: With less snowpack to kill ticks, moose in New Hampshire are literally being eaten alive, losing so much blood to ticks that they die of anemia. White-tailed deer are susceptible to hemorrhagic disease caused by viruses transmitted by biting midges

Nowhere to Run outlines the key steps needed to stem climate change and save big game:

  1. Address the underlying cause and cut carbon pollution 50 percent by 2030.
  2. Transition to cleaner, more secure sources of energy like offshore wind, solar power and next-generation biofuels and avoid polluting energy like coal and tar sands oil.
  3. Safeguard wildlife and their habitats by promoting climate-smart approaches to conservation.
  4. Factor a changing climate in big game plans and management.

Read the report at NWF.org/Sportsmen. Nowhere to Run is the latest in the National Wildlife Federation’s 2013 Wildlife in a Warming World series:


WEMU's Bob Eccles has a conversation with the folks behind the University of Michigan's Heritage Project.

Creative Commons/ grifray

Sustaining our food future through aquaculture.   Jim Diana is a Professor of Fisheries and Aquaculture at the University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources, and he's our guest on this week's Issues of the Environment from WEMU.

UofM Oversees Fracking Study

Nov 29, 2012

The University of Michigan's Graham Sustainability Institute is overseeing a study of the effects of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in Michigan.  Hear more from WEMU's Bob Eccles.

Legislation designed to give consolidating school districts in Michigan three years in which they don't have to worry about competition from new charter schools will not be considered this year.  Hear more from WEMU's Bob Eccles.

A state environmental group is out with a report that for the first time equates the amount of wind energy produced in Michigan to the amount of greenhouse gasses it displaced.  Hear more from WEMU's Bob Eccles.

University of Michigan students in the Michigan Energy Club got an update on state ballot proposal number three.  Hear more from WEMU's Andrew Cluley.

Some environmentalists oppose the 25X25 proposal on Michigan's November ballot.  Hear why on this week's Issues of the Environment from WEMU.

ACLU and others blast new anti-abortion bills.

Rcalling Governors and Dissecting News

May 15, 2012

Michigan Rising
The News Dissector

Today Lynn talks to Bruce Fealk from Michigan Rising about the effort to recall Governor Snyder. She also talks to 'news dissector' Danny Schechter.

Snyder administration wants to get rid of personal property tax on businesses.

The Lynn Rivers Show

May 1, 2012

Michigan's medical marijuana law. 
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In 2008, Michigan voters approved the use of medical marijuana.  Since then, the state's attorneys general have been fighting to keep the law from taking full effect. 

New poll shows Michigan voters are willing to pay higher taxes for transportation.

The Lynn Rivers Show

Feb 14, 2012

This week, the Lynn Rivers Show focuses on the financial plight of Michigan's cities.  

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