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2015 WEMU Blues Barbecue w/ Madcat's Midnight Blues Journey

If you gave $150 or more to WEMU this spring, your admission for two is a bonus premium and your name is on the guest list for the Blues Barbecue Thursday, June 11th, from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. outside at the EMU Convocation Center (In the atrium in case of rain).
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Shari Kane and Dave Steele
courtesy of the artist

Warm and delicious as hot buttered cinnamon toast, as easy and relaxed as a rewarding after-dinner talk and as soothing as Sunday morning.  That’s my immediate reaction to Feels Like Home, the new album by Shari Kane and Dave Steele.  It’s a perfect complement to the couple’s first recording, Four Hands Blues.  They continue their loving exploration of classic American music including Piedmont and Delta blues along with mountain gospel, Appalachian ballads and ragtime swing guitar.  What differentiates Feels Like Home from Four Hands Blues is the home setting.  Shari and Dave actually built a home studio and took their good sweet time working through each song as we eavesdrop on their intimate conversation involving call and response from acoustic guitar to mandolin to voice.  

Michigan Theater / www.michtheater.org

Listen as David Fair, and Michigan Theater Executive Director, Russ Collins discuss what's playing around town and downtown.


Construction
Flickr / jakelv7500

A special state House committee has started to look for ways to pay for roads and transportation after voters overwhelmingly said “NO” to Proposal One. 

Do you ever feel like communication — in this Age of Communication — is more confused and confusing than ever? Does anybody even read whole messages anymore — beyond the subject line or the first screen? Do you get tangled up in threads and bewildered by attachments? Do txt msgs n-furi-8 u?

Here's the real question: Are all these communication devices truly improving interaction between humans or just providing more opportunities for miscommunication?

When the final episode came, after weeks of accolades and tributes to his genius, David Letterman made sure he punctured the emotion of the moment with a little old-fashioned, self-deprecating sarcasm.

Beezy’s Cafe looks like a thriving business. The six-year-old restaurant and coffeehouse draws crowds for breakfast and lunch, employs 16 people, has a trail of glowing reviews for its “hippy vibe” and “super friendly” staff, and recently extended its hours to serve dinner on Fridays and Saturdays. But to banks, it’s a risky venture with little appeal.

courtesy AAPS / Ann Arbor Public Schools

The US News and World Report has placed several area schools on its 2015 list of Best High Schools.

As 2015 develops, so will WEMU’s 50th Anniversary Celebration. We began broadcasting at 10 watts to EMU dormitories in 1965 and are now the award-winning and nationally recognized NPR, news, jazz and blues service you know and depend on.

Gov. Rick Snyder outlined a public safety agenda on Monday that includes parole and sentencing reforms, job training for inmates, and more help finding a job once they’re released from prison.

Snyder says there are data-driven ways to reduce the state’s prison population without compromising public safety.

To understand how heroin took hold in rural America, you need to go back two decades and look at the surge of prescription drug use in Portsmouth, Ohio, according to journalist Sam Quinones.

A Rust Belt town that had fallen on hard times by the 1990s, Portsmouth became a place where doctors dispensed prescription drugs more freely than anywhere else in the country, Quinones writes in his new book, Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic.

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