NPR Story
4:00 am
Mon October 17, 2011

Indy Champ Wheldon Dies In Las Vegas Speedway Crash

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 5:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The world of IndyCar racing has lost one of its stars. Two-time Indianapolis 500 winner Dan Wheldon was killed yesterday during an IndyCar race in Las Vegas. Wheldon was trailing a pack of cars when he was unable to avoid a massive pile-up.

(SOUNDBITE OF BROADCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Oh, here we go. (Unintelligible) a huge crash. Up at turn number two. Oh, multiple cars involved.

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NPR Story
4:00 am
Mon October 17, 2011

Obama Helps Dedicate Memorial To Martin Luther King Jr.

President Obama spoke at the long-delayed dedication of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial on Sunday. Almost 50 years after the March on Washington, Obama said, barricades and bigotry have come down. But the nation still faces severe economic challenges and too many neighborhoods with too little hope.

Author Interviews
12:01 am
Mon October 17, 2011

Whitehead's 'Zone' Is No Average Zombie Apocalypse

Colson Whitehead is also the author of The Intuitionist, John Henry Days, Apex Hides the Hurt and Sag Harbor.

Erin Patrice O'Brien Doubleday

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 5:20 am

If you ask Colson Whitehead to describe the man at the center of his new novel, Zone One, he'll tell you: "It's about a guy just trying to make it to the next day without being killed — so it's about New Yorkers."

But character Mark Spitz isn't just any New Yorker. He's one of the only human survivors of a mysterious plague that has swept the world, turning billions of people into zombies. New York is devastated and Spitz is charged with clearing the undead from lower Manhattan.

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Africa
12:01 am
Mon October 17, 2011

Misrata Militia Restricts Who May Enter Libyan City

A check point between Misrata and Beni Walid, Libya.

Lopez Jean Baptiste SIPA

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 11:15 am

Forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi terrorized the Libyan city of Misrata during the civil war. Because it never fell, the city became an icon of the revolution. But Misrata now is gaining a reputation for a militia that is carrying out acts of vengeance, looting and restricting movements in and out of the city.

Wags now quip that a visa is needed to enter Misrata because of the tight restrictions on access to the large coastal city. But it's no joke to the people here.

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The Salt
12:01 am
Mon October 17, 2011

Look Who's Going Gluten-Free

French Laundry pastry chef Lena Kwak with the gluten-free flour she developed.

Sara Davis Thomas Keller Restaurant Group

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 9:25 am

Gluten-free isn't just for natural foodies anymore. It's gone mainstream. So much so, it's even been embraced by restaurateur Thomas Keller, one of the nation's top chefs (he's the only one with three Michelin stars for two restaurants).

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Politics
12:01 am
Mon October 17, 2011

Times Have Changed Since Reagan's 1986 Tax Reform

The clock is ticking down on Capitol Hill as a congressional super committee has only until Thanksgiving to agree on a plan shrinking deficits by more than a trillion dollars. The entire Congress then has to pass it by Christmas Eve or face huge across-the-board spending cuts.

Twenty-five years ago, another politically-divided Congress approved the biggest tax code overhaul in the nation's history. But much has changed since then.

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Election 2012
12:01 am
Mon October 17, 2011

Financial Reports Shed Little Light On GOP Race

So far in the Republican presidential contest, the poll numbers have been continually changing, with candidates moving up and then down again. The primary dates are also in flux, with at least four states moving theirs up to January to try to influence the outcome. But there's another set of numbers to watch: the candidates' fundraising totals.

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Crisis In The Housing Market
12:01 am
Mon October 17, 2011

Housing Recovery At Various Stages Around The U.S.

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Realtor Lee Brown says Charlotte, N.C., has a whole community of "starter castles," which were built during the housing boom. One foreclosed home is expected to go for about half the value it was in 2007.

Michael Tomsic

The housing market may be getting more attractive for buying a home. Foreclosures continue to rise, but prices are stabilizing in some places across the country. Just as communities experienced the housing bubble differently, they are also feeling varying degrees of recovery.

Charlotte: 'Two Chandeliers In The Dining Room'

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2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.
12:01 am
Mon October 17, 2011

For A Bilingual Writer, 'No One True Language'

Gustavo Perez Firmat is a Cuban-American who writes novels, memoirs, poetry, and academic works in both Spanish and English. "But I have the feeling that I'm not fluent in either one," he says. "Words fail me in both languages."

Perez Firmat, who is also a professor at Columbia University, says that being bilingual can be both a blessing and a burden.

"I don't have one true language," Perez Firmat tells Morning Edition co-host Renee Montagne.

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Barack Obama
12:01 am
Mon October 17, 2011

Obama Bus Tour Rides Rough Political Terrain In N.C.

President Obama begins a campaign-style bus tour Monday in North Carolina and Virginia to try to drum up support for his jobs bill and his re-election campaign.

He starts in the Tar Heel State, which he won by a narrow margin in 2008 and where he now faces a struggle to stay competitive for 2012.

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