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With an eye on the future of online retailing, Walmart and Google are teaming up to go after rival Amazon in a play that also targets the growing market for voice-activated shopping.

Starting next month, Walmart customers will be able to access hundreds of thousands of products from the company's shelves — everything from dish washing soap to dining tables — via the online retailing service Google Express. Until now, Walmart's enormous inventory was available online only through the company's own website.

The United Nations' Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination has urged the U.S. government to reject racist speech and ideology and criticized its "failure at the highest political level" to unequivocally condemn the racist violence at Charlottesville, Va., earlier this month.

A heartsick surface Navy is vowing to find answers after a series of mishaps that could make the peacetime Western Pacific deadlier for U.S. troops this year than Afghanistan.

The Navy began, as it often does, with accountability: On Wednesday it fired the three-star admiral whose command in the Western Pacific suffered at least four big accidents this year, two of which may have killed a combined 17 sailors.

An officer aboard the destroyer USS Stethem also was lost overboard off the Philippines on Aug. 1.

An airstrike apparently targeting Houthi rebels hit a hotel north of Yemen's capital, Sanaa, killing dozens of people.

Al-Masirah TV, a network run by the rebels who control the capital, said more than 40 people were killed in the strike in Arhab. But The Associated Press, citing Yemeni officials and witnesses, put the number of fatalities at about 60.

The AP writes:

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While on holiday in Rome five years ago, Devon Akmon, director of the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, Mich., took a food tour in a neighborhood known for its culinary traditions. He walked around for hours, tasting samples and hearing the personal stories of shop owners. That experience sparked the idea of establishing walking food tours in metro Detroit, home to the largest concentrated Arab community in the United States.

A year ago, Maine was one of the first states to set limits on opioid prescriptions. The goal in capping the dose of prescription painkillers a patient could get was to stem the flow of opioids that are fueling a nationwide epidemic of abuse.

Maine's law, considered the toughest in the U.S., is largely viewed as a success. But it has also been controversial — particularly among chronic pain patients who are reluctant to lose the medicine they say helps them function.

This story was reported for radio by Elissa Nadworny and for the web by Jon Marcus of the Hechinger Report.

In her spotless camouflage uniform, Monica Callan stood apart from the dirty and exhausted-looking first-year cadets at the U.S. Air Force Academy who had just endured nearly three hours on the obstacle course.

Following the violence in Charlottesville, Va., Silicon Valley tech firms removed far-right groups from search results, cut off their websites and choked their ability to raise money online.

The moves have leaders on the far-right calling for the government to step in and regulate these companies. They have some strange bedfellows in this too — many liberals also are calling for more regulation of the same companies.

On the far-right is Richard Spencer. Most people in the U.S. would find Spencer's political views reprehensible: He is a white supremacist.

On the evening of Sept. 11, 2012, intruders attacked the diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya. They fired machine guns and rocket-propelled grenades. Buildings there burned. By the following day, four Americans had died, including Ambassador Chris Stevens.

Now, almost five years after that deadly episode, one man accused in the attacks is preparing for trial in Washington, D.C.

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'To E, Or Not To E'

7 hours ago

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When White House chief strategist Steve Bannon was pushed out of his job last week, it underscored the growing clout of President Trump's chief of staff, John Kelly, a retired Marine Corps general.

And when Trump announced he was increasing U.S. troops in Afghanistan on Monday, after suggesting for years that he wouldn't, administration officials were quick to note that he was heeding the advice of "the generals."

Oregon, Texas Lay Down Markers On Abortion Coverage

7 hours ago

Federal health insurance rules are a moving target, and it's unclear whether Republicans will take another run at replacing the Affordable Care Act. In the meantime, some states are staking out strong positions on coverage of abortion, regardless of how the federal landscape changes.

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Foo Fighters Try A Live 'Rickroll'

7 hours ago

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Updated at 4:25 a.m.

Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin, the three-star commander of the U.S. 7th Fleet was relieved of command on Wednesday. The fleet is based in Yokosuka, Japan.

A statement from the Navy explains why Aucoin was dismissed.

A decades-long effort to clean up the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary, is showing signs of success. But scientists now say progress could be hindered by a hydroelectric dam, located on the Susquehanna River in northern Maryland.

The Conowingo Dam has been holding back pollution for nearly a century, but recent research shows it has filled up with sediment faster than expected.

"It's now at a point where it's essentially, effectively full," says Bill Ball, director of the Chesapeake Research Consortium. "The capacity's been reached."

The developer behind the Dakota Access Pipeline, which for months drew thousands of protesters, has sued Greenpeace and several other environmental groups for their role in delaying the pipeline's construction.

The British publisher of an academic journal has reversed a decision to take down hundreds of articles from its Chinese website.

In a statement released Monday, Cambridge University Press said it's reposting the more than 300 articles to "The China Quarterly."

The push for renewable energy in the U.S. often focuses on well-established sources of electricity: solar, wind and hydropower. Off the coast of California, a team of researchers is working on what they hope will become an energy source of the future — macroalgae, otherwise known as kelp.

This week's Trump presidency Internet sideshow (see also: Melania appearing to bat Trump's hand away, the president's aggressive handshakes, the frenzy over Kellyanne Conway's inauguration outfit) came in the form of a couture-heavy Instagram post from Louise Linton, a Scottish-born actr

The vicious shade-throwing by the Treasury secretary's wife, Louise Linton, Monday was intended to put an Instagram commenter on blast, but it almost immediately blew up in the Scottish-born actress' perfectly made-up face.

Now, nearly a full day later, the 36-year-old has apologized through a spokesperson.

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