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The Two-Way
2:32 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

No One's Claimed Mega Millions Win, Maryland Lottery Official Says

We still don't know who bought the three winning tickets in Friday's $656 million Mega Millions lottery drawing — one in Illinois, one in Kansas and one in Maryland.

And we still don't know what's going on with Mirlande Wilson, the Maryland woman who has made headlines by claiming to have purchased a big winner, but who hasn't yet provided any proof.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:17 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

Across America, The Grip of Prescription Painkillers Tightens

Hydrocodone is a key ingredient in the prescription painkiller Vicodin.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Sat April 7, 2012 8:58 am

Tens of millions of Americans turn to powerful painkillers to ease their sufferings. But an analysis on the sales of two prescription drugs over a decade is particularly worrisome.

Check out The Associated Press' interactive map at the end of this post. It uses data from the Drug Enforcement Agency to show how sales of oxycodone and hydrocodone ballooned from 2000-10.

You can click on individual states to see which areas had the biggest increases.

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The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

'Three Cups' Author Mismanaged Charity, Will Repay $1 Million

Greg Mortenson, author of Three Cups of Tea and Stone Into Schools, with schoolchildren in Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.
Central Asia Institute

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 1:59 pm

The author of Three Cups of Tea has agreed to repay $1 million to a charity he founded, after the Montana Attorney General's office found that he had mismanaged the nonprofit by spending charity money on personal items.

The AP reports that Greg Mortenson misspent Central Asia Institute funds on "family vacations and millions on charter flights."

The AP adds Mortenson pretty much had unchallenged control of the non-profit:

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

'Kill The Head, The Body Will Die,' NFL's Gregg Williams Heard Telling Players

Gregg Williams, then a coach with the New Orleans Saints, in August 2011.
Bill Haber AP

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Economy
1:50 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

Just How Strong Is The Job Market?

Job seekers attend a career fair in New York City. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke says the quick drop in unemployment might have been a reversal of overzealous cutbacks during the financial crisis.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 5:44 am

The monthly employment report Friday could help answer a key question about the economy: Will the recently strong job growth slow once employers finish replacing the people they fired during the depths of the recession?

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U.S.
12:46 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

How Lawyer Got Nation Talking About Trayvon Martin

Benjamin Crump (right), the attorney for Trayvon Martin's family, is joined by the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jessie Jackson at a protest in Sanford, Fla., last week. Crump has enlisted the help of prominent civil rights activists to draw attention to the case.
Roberto Gonzalez Getty Images

The prosecutor investigating the shooting of Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla., has not yet decided if she will bring charges against the shooter, George Zimmerman.

It took several weeks for the Feb. 26 shooting to draw the nation's attention — after Benjamin Crump, the attorney for Trayvon Martin's family, launched a campaign to get the case before media and civil rights activists nationwide.

Two days after the shooting, the high-profile civil rights attorney started getting calls about the case. "My phone was buzzing," Crump says.

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The Two-Way
12:18 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

Security Company Says About 600,000 Macs Infected With Trojan Virus

A map released by Dr. Web shows where the anti-virus software company found infected Macs.
Dr. Web

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 1:51 pm

A Russian computer security firm says it has discovered that about 600,000 Apple computers have been infected with a "Flashback Trojan" virus.

Now, before we move on, you should know that the company making the announcement is Dr. Web, which sells anti-virus software that will protect a computer against that kind of virus. It's also important to note that many of the parties weighing in are part of a security community that makes money off selling anti-virus software.

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The Two-Way
12:04 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

Two Years After W. Va. Mine Disaster: Grief, Anger And Questions Linger

Tonight, in Whitesville, W.Va., mourners will silently walk with candles on sidewalks lined with luminary lights to remember the 29 coal miners who died two years ago today in the nation's worst mine disaster in 40 years.

That memorial will follow a 3 p.m. ET event in Beckley,W. Va., where an honor guard will ring a bell 29 times to mark the moment the Upper Big Branch coal mine erupted in a massive explosion.

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Education
12:00 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

NYC Chancellor On Turning Around City's Schools

Dennis Walcott oversees a school system with more than one million students. Graduation rates are below the national average, and studies suggest most of the city's high school graduates are not ready for college. But Chancellor Walcott tells host Michel Martin that, after one year on the job, New York City schools are on the mend.

Race
12:00 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

In Trayvon Martin Case, Who's Considered White?

Race is central to the debate surrounding Trayvon Martin, the black Florida teen shot by neighborhood watch volunteer, George Zimmerman. Many media outlets first identified Zimmerman as "white," but his father describes him as a Spanish-speaking minority. Host Michel Martin explores the question, "who is white?" with sociologist Jean Halley.

The Salt
11:57 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Chocolate Bilbies, Not Bunnies, For An Australian Easter

The bilby is an endangered Australian marsupial that has been run out of its habitat by humans and rabbits.
Courtesy of Australia's Queensland State Government.

In the turf war between rabbits and bilbies that plays out in burrows dug into Australia's arid grasslands, rabbits, those aggressive and fertile European immigrants, have largely won out.

But the chocolate bilby has staked its claim on the springtime candy shelf — an honor that could help the threatened species make a real comeback.

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Economy
11:24 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Debt Struggles As Old As America Itself

An 18th century political cartoon entitled "A New Way to Pay the National Debt."
Library of Congress

As of today, the national debt held by the public is more than $10 trillion. That's more than $30,000 for every man, woman and child living in the United States.

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It's All Politics
9:32 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Thursday Political Grab Bag: Poll Shows Romney Surge In PA

Mitt Romney has taken the lead in voter support in Pennsylvania, according to a new poll from Public Policy Polling which shows the Republican frontrunner ahead of Rick Santorum, the former U.S. senator from the Keystone State, 42 percent to 37 percent. That lead was just on the 4.9 point margin of error, suggesting a tie. That's bad news for Santorum, however, as he dropped six percentage points while Romney gained 17 percent from a month ago.

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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Jobless Claims Stay Around Four-Year Low

The number of people filing first-time claims for unemployment insurance stayed around a four-year low last week, the Employment and Training Administration just reported.

It says there were 357,000 such applications, down 6,000 from the previous week's revised figure of 363,000.

Claims have been running at the lowest rate since March and April 2008 for several weeks now.

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Shots - Health Blog
8:31 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Cancer Diagnosis Raises Risk Of Death From Heart Attack, Suicide

The danger of death by heart attack or suicide is greatest in the first week after a cancer diagnosis.
Max Delson Martins Santos iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 10:51 am

Finding out that you have cancer greatly increases the risk of death by heart attack or suicide, according to a new study. That risk is especially big in the first week after getting the bad news.

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The Two-Way
7:55 am
Thu April 5, 2012

The Masters Begins: Will Tiger Woods Win? Do You Want Him To?

Tiger Woods, teeing off during a practice round at Augusta National on Thursday.
Streeter Lecka Getty Images
  • On 'Morning Edition': Christine Brennan talks with Steve Inskeep

They're teeing off this morning in Augusta, Ga. It's the Masters, the first of the "major" tournaments for men each year.

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Around the Nation
7:11 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Personal Brick Offer Backfires On Baseball's Marlins

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 7:17 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The Miami Marlins got more than they bargained for when the animal rights group PETA bought a personalized brick in the team's new stadium. The engraving reads: Florida is still hosting incredible night games, helps us reach the stars, cheer our Marlins. But the brick contains a hidden message. Taking the first letter of each word, it spells out fishinghurts.com, which would lead Marlin fans to PETA's anti-fishing website. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
7:05 am
Thu April 5, 2012

In Greece, Retiree's Suicide Sparks Protests And Clashes With Police

Demonstrators clashed with riot police in Athens overnight.
Aris Messinis AFP/Getty Images

The human toll from the financial crisis in Greece now has a human face.

After 77-year-old retired pharmacist Dimitris Christoulas killed himself Wednesday outside the parliament building in Athens, a suicide note he left was reported to say that he felt he must take a "dignified end to my life" because austerity measures and "annihilated all traces for my survival," particularly his pension.

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Around the Nation
7:02 am
Thu April 5, 2012

No Really, The Dog Ate My Masters Tickets

A Seattle man came home to discover that his dog had eaten his tickets to the Masters in Augusta, Ga. After the dog threw up, he managed to re-assemble the tickets. After all that effort, the Masters says they'll re-print his tickets anyway.

Election 2012
4:00 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Romney's Rhetoric Shifts Toward November Election

Mitt Romney is closer to winning the GOP presidential nomination after primary victories this week in Wisconsin, Maryland and Washington, D.C. Halfway through the GOP nominating season, Romney's attacks on President Obama are intensifying.

Business
4:00 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Bond Auction Indicates Europe's Troubles Persist

A Spanish bond auction went poorly Wednesday, suggesting that Spain may be becoming the next Greece. It was the first auction without a lot of help from the European central bank.

Business
4:00 am
Thu April 5, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 8:00 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is cardboard to classy.

Today, Domino's Pizza is hoping to complete its rebranding as a place that does not sell lousy pizza. The effort started a couple of years ago when the company actually criticized itself in ads like this one.

(SOUNDBITE OF DOMINO'S PIZZA AD)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Domino's Pizza crust, to me, is like cardboard.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Sports
4:00 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Competition For Green Jacket Begins In Augusta

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Master's begins today in Augusta, Georgia. It's the first of the four majors that punctuate the golf season, and the only one of the majors that is always played at the same course: the perfectly manicured Augusta National. Behind the gorgeous imagery, the private golf club is dealing with an awkward issue, and USA Today sports columnist Christine Brennan is here to talk about it.

Christine, good morning once again.

CHRISTINE BRENNAN: Good morning, Steve.

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Around the Nation
4:00 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Fla. Task Force Examines Stand-Your-Ground Law

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 6:21 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Martin Luther King was assassinated 44 years ago this week. When people in Miami held a rally to mark that anniversary, local activist Billy Hardemon brought up the killing of another Martin.

BILLY HARDEMON: Two Martins that died too young, Trayvon and Martin Luther King.

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