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Shots - Health Blog
6:42 am
Sat June 2, 2012

The Paleo Diet Moves From The Gym To The Doctor's Office

Some physicians say the theory of "evolutionary medicine" can help guide the treatment of modern ailments like obesity.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 1:24 pm

By now the paleo diet and lifestyle has inched from the fringe a little closer to the mainstream, thanks to some very passionate followers sold on the notion that our Paleolithic hunter-gatherer ancestors avoided modern day ailments like obesity and diabetes because they ate what some consider an "ideal" diet of meat, fruit and veget

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Food
6:20 am
Sat June 2, 2012

America's Gone Bananas: Here's How It Happened

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat June 2, 2012 11:01 am

Today, Americans take bananas for granted. They're cheap, they're ripe, they're everywhere. But take a moment and consider: How did a pale, fragile tropical fruit become so commonplace in America? Immigrants arriving at the South Ferry terminal, where the Ellis Island ferry landed, were once handed bananas and told, "Welcome to America."

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Books
6:09 am
Sat June 2, 2012

London's Mayor On 'The City That Made The World'

London Mayor Boris Johnson stands atop the ArcelorMittal Orbit, an observation tower in London's Olympic Park, at its unveiling on May 11. Johnson is the author of Johnson's Life of London: The People Who Made the City That Made the World.
Christopher Lee Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 2, 2012 11:01 am

In just a few weeks, the world will descend on London for the Olympic Games.

But the world goes to London every day, according to Boris Johnson, the former journalist who has just been re-elected mayor of London. In his new book, Johnson says people don't just visit the city, they've made their lives there for centuries now. It's a city, Johnson writes, where national soccer teams from all over the world can show up and count on crowds of thousands of fans to support them.

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Religion
5:57 am
Sat June 2, 2012

Conspiracies Swirl As Vatican Scandal Engulfs Rome

Pope Benedict XVI waves as he arrives for his weekly general audience on May 30 at St. Peter's Square at the Vatican.
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 2, 2012 7:13 pm

The scandal over leaked documents that has been engulfing the Vatican is the biggest breach of confidence and security at the Holy See in recent memory.

Known as Vatileaks, the crisis has shed light on a Vatican gripped by intrigue and power struggles like a Renaissance court.

Vatileaks erupted into a full-blown scandal with the publication two weeks ago of a book of Vatican documents alleging corruption and conspiracies among cardinals.

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National Security
5:56 am
Sat June 2, 2012

'Flame' Virus Fuels Political Heat Over Cyber Threats

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat June 2, 2012 1:51 pm

New information about computer viruses shows how countries may be lining up to fight a cyberwar. The New York Times reported that former President George W. Bush and President Obama both authorized computer attacks against Iran, culminating in the Stuxnet virus, which targeted Iranian nuclear facilities.

Meanwhile, a United Nations agency raised alarms about another virus, dubbed "Flame," which may also have been designed for use against Iran.

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Politics
5:53 am
Sat June 2, 2012

Fingers Point As Job Numbers Fall

Trader Peter Tuchman works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange at the close of trading Friday. The stock market suffered its worst day of the year after a surprisingly weak jobs report.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Sat June 2, 2012 2:01 pm

If unusually warm weather helped encourage job growth earlier this year, May was like a wet, cold rain. A report from the Labor Department on Friday showed that U.S. employers added just 69,000 jobs last month — far fewer than expected.

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The Two-Way
5:23 am
Sat June 2, 2012

Ousted Egyptian Leader Mubarak Sentenced To Life In Prison

An image grab taken from Egyptian state TV shows ousted Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak sitting inside a cage in a courtroom during his verdict hearing in Cairo Saturday.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 3:47 pm

Hosni Mubarak received a life sentence from a court in Cairo today after being charged in connection with the killing of protesters during last year's uprising. The uprising pushed Mubarak to resign last year after nearly 30 years in power.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:03 am
Sat June 2, 2012

A (Very) Young Composer Gets His Chance At The New York Philharmonic

Very Young Composer Milo Poniewozik at the New York Philharmonic's School Day Concerts, where his piece was performed in front of more than 2,000 kids.
Michael DiVito New York Philharmonic

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:51 pm

What would it be like if you were 10 years old and composed a piece of music that was played by the New York Philharmonic? For a few New York City school kids, including one fifth-grader, it's a dream come true, thanks to the orchestra's Very Young Composers program.

Composer Jon Deak, who played bass with the New York Philharmonic for more than 40 years, says the idea for Very Young Composers came when he and conductor Marin Alsop visited an elementary school in Brooklyn several years ago.

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Music Interviews
6:59 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Kelly Hogan: Cashing In An Album's Worth Of Favors

Kelly Hogan's new album is I Like to Keep Myself in Pain.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 2, 2012 11:01 am

"I started singing in bars when I was still in high school," says Kelly Hogan. "It's not the easiest thing to do if you like to eat something besides ramen noodles and have insurance."

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The Two-Way
6:54 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

The Same Scene Over And Over: A Syrian Describes Houla Massacre

The Houla massacre left more than 100 Syrians dead. Some of them were women. Most of them were children.

The Syrian President Bashar Assad has denied responsibility. But the United Nations has pinned the blame mostly on his government.

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The Two-Way
6:26 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Romney's Financial Disclosure Documents Detail Stock Sales

Today at about 4 p.m., Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney filed his public financial disclosure with the Federal Election Commission. The report outlines the former Massachusetts governor's assets and liabilities.

We'll embed a copy of the report at the bottom of this post and we'll add more details to this post as we work through them.

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Money & Politics
6:02 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Why Political Ads In 2012 May All Look Alike

Screen grabs of four separate ads from four different political groups critical of President Obama's handling of Solyndra, the failed solar-panel maker. Clockwise from top left, the ads are from: Americans for Prosperity, MittRomney.com, American Crossroads and Crossroads GPS.

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 6:48 pm

Among the biggest advertisers in the presidential campaign is a group that says it doesn't do political advertising: Crossroads GPS.

Crossroads GPS — which stands for Grassroots Policy Strategies — was co-founded by Republican strategist Karl Rove. It and others like it enable wealthy donors to finance attack ads while avoiding the public identification they would face if they gave to more overtly political committees.

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World
5:03 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Struggling U.S. Economy Drags Down The World

Slow economic growth in the U.S. is having an impact on many countries around the world. Here, people walk past a board flashing the Nikkei index on the Tokyo Stock Exchange in Japan last month.
Toru Yamanaka AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 5:38 pm

The sputtering U.S. economy isn't just bad news for America, it's a drag on the global economic outlook as well.

"What matters to the rest of the world is the amount of demand the United States is going to generate," says economist Eswar Prasad, a professor of trade policy at Cornell.

"Weak job growth translates to weak domestic demand in the U.S., and that concerns all of the U.S.'s major trading partners," he says.

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Business
5:03 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

No Beer Goggles For Baseball Stadium Brew Prices

A fan of the St. Louis Cardinals buys a beer from a vendor prior to Game 3 of the World Series against the Detroit Tigers at Busch Stadium in 2006. At 56 cents an ounce, St. Louis is second only to Boston for the priciest ballpark brew in the country.
Jamie Squire Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 6:13 pm

Change has been the story of the season for the Miami Marlins, formerly the Florida Marlins. With a new coach, a new name, new team colors and a new stadium the baseball team set a franchise record for winning games in May.

But one tradition isn't changing anytime soon: beer. Ordering a beer at a baseball game is as American as apple pie. So is forking over a small fortune for that beer.

According to an analysis by TheStreet.com, the most expensive beer of any baseball stadium is sold at the new Marlins Park, where baseball fans pay $8 for a Bud Light draft.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:47 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

As Nations Develop, Cancer Takes Hold

No corner of the world is safe from cancer.
iStockphoto

Cancer is everywhere.

And, before long, cancer will be a major cause of death in every part of the world, not just a big factor in what's now the developed world.

In 2030 the world's population is expected to hit 8.3 billion, up from 7 billion today. By then, new cases of cancer cases are expected to nearly double to 20.3 million from 12.8 million in 2008, according to an analysis in The Lancet Oncology.

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Law
4:29 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Edwards Verdict: A Case Of Campaign Law Confusion

Former Sen. John Edwards leaves federal court in Greensboro, N.C., Thursday after jurors acquitted him of one felony count and a judge declared a mistrial on five other charges.
Sara D. Davis Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 10:29 pm

From the day a grand jury indicted former Sen. John Edwards on six felony charges nearly one year ago, the case drew jeers from election lawyers and government watchdogs.

"It was an incredibly aggressive prosecution because it was based on a novel theory of the law," says Melanie Sloan, executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. "There was literally no precedent. No case had ever been like this."

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The Two-Way
4:15 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

As The Worm Turns: Cybersecurity Expert Tracks Blowback From Stuxnet

Iran's Bushehr nuclear power plant, shown in this International Iran Photo Agency image from August 2010, was infected by the Stuxnet computer worm — which reportedly was created in the United States.
Ebrahim Norouzi AP

The CIA has a term called "blowback" to describe when an operation against the enemy has unintended negative consequences for the U.S. or its allies. In the age of cyberwarfare, blowback seems to be a paramount concern.

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The Two-Way
4:01 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Facebook Will Allow Users To Vote On Privacy Changes

Facebook's logo.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Facebook will ask its nearly 1 billion users to vote up or down on changes to its privacy policy.

According to a statement released by the social network, the company also put changes up for a vote in 2009. Voting begins today and goes through June 8.

"If more than 30 percent of all active registered users vote, the results will be binding," Facebook said. "If turnout is less than 30 percent, the vote will be advisory."

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Music Interviews
3:57 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

How An Author And A Singer Became Musical 'Kin'

The new album Kin is a collaboration between author Mary Karr and singer-songwriter Rodney Crowell.
Deborah Feingold Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 6:13 pm

In 2003, in a song called "Earthbound," singer Rodney Crowell name-checked a writer he admires a lot: Mary Karr, who has written searing memoirs, including the best-seller The Liars' Club, as well as several books of poetry.

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Middle East
3:35 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Egypt Braces For Verdict In Hosni Mubarak Trial

Supporters of Mubarak in Cairo chant slogans and carry his portrait as they demonstrate in February during his trial, outside the police academy.
Carsten Koall Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 6:13 pm

An Egyptian court plans to announce the verdict Saturday in the trial of former President Hosni Mubarak, and regardless of which way the decision goes, it could prompt a public outpouring of emotion at a sensitive moment for the country.

Mubarak is charged with corruption and complicity in the deaths of hundreds of protesters during the revolution last year that ousted him.

If convicted, he could face the death penalty. But some are predicting he'll be acquitted, and that could set off another round of protests and possibly violence.

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The Two-Way
3:14 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

George Zimmerman's Bond Revoked, Must Surrender Within 48 Hours

George Zimmerman during his bond hearing in a Seminole County, Fla., courtroom on April 20.
Gary Green Orlando Sentinel-Pool/Getty Images

A Florida judge this afternoon revoked George Zimmernan's bond and ordered that the man who killed teenager Trayvon Martin surrender himself to authorities within 48 hours, the Orlando Sentinel writes.

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Europe
3:00 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

As Greeks Withdraw Cash, Banks Grow Vulnerable

Many Greeks fear that the value of their savings will drop sharply if the country leaves the eurozone and returns to the drachma. This has led many Greeks to withdraw their money from banks.
John Kolesidis Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 6:13 pm

Since the Greek debt crisis began nearly three years ago, more than $90 billion has left the country.

At first, it was just big business and the wealthiest Greeks moving money abroad in case Greece dropped the euro and reverted to its previous currency, the drachma.

Now people with smaller portfolios are also withdrawing money, and that's left the country's fragile banks on edge.

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The Salt
2:55 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

How To Grow The Tastiest Tomato? One Secret's In The Soil

A tomato expert recommends planting seedlings in rich soil with lots of organic matter and a steady slow-release fertilizer.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 3:57 pm

It's tomato time here in the mid-Atlantic – the critical moment when those of us eager to pull fat, bright fruit off our own backyard vines in a couple months are scurrying to get tender little plants in the ground.

But as anyone who's spent a few summers of kneeling in the dirt can tell you, healthy-looking vines will not necessarily get you a mind-blowingly delicious tomato. And why?

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The Two-Way
2:34 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

'Help' Hizzoner: Tell Bloomberg What To Ban Next

What's he got his eye on now? New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 5:59 pm

So, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg (I) wants to ban nearly all sales of big, sugary drinks.

Goodbye Big Gulp.

This comes after his earlier campaigns to stamp out smoking and trans fats.

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The Two-Way
2:34 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

First-Edition Book Of Mormon Goes Missing From Ariz. Store

An 1830 first-edition Book of Mormon owned by retired bookstore owner Helen Schlie.
Matt York AP

The first-edition Book of Mormon brought faithful from around the country to a book store in Mesa, Ariz.

As the AP describes it, the book is one of 5,000 printed "after Joseph Smith found the gold plates that he translated into the Book of Mormon, which members of the faith consider to be scripture alongside the Bible."

So when people came to take pictures with the book Helen Schlie, a converted Mormon, would always oblige, telling people when they touched the book they shared "their DNA with Joseph Smith himself."

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