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It's All Politics
12:29 pm
Mon October 31, 2011

Poll: Cain And Perry Tied In Texas

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 12:56 pm

In what may be the most impressive and surprising sign of the Herman Cain phenomenon yet, the Republican presidential candidate was essentially tied with native son Gov. Rick Perry in Texas, of all places.

A University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll put Cain at 27 percent support and Perry, the three-term governor at 26 percent. The margin of error was plus/minus 3.46 percent.

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7 Billion And Counting
12:00 pm
Mon October 31, 2011

7 Billion: Trick Or Treat For Crowded Countries?

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 12:34 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, host: I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Happy Halloween. If all the witches, goblins, and ghosts coming to your door don't scare you enough, then you might want to head south of the border for an encounter with Sante Meurte, or the Saint of Death. In a few minutes, we'll talk about why the veneration of this folk saint seems to have really taken off in the last decade or so and why the Catholic church is not happy about it. But first, happy birthday to the world's seven billionth inhabitant.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:54 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Stomach Bug Has A Field Day At NBA

Locker rooms and clubhouses should be disinfected regularly with a solution such as bleach that's effective against the stubborn norovirus, researchers say.

iStockphoto.com

It's the season for stomach bugs again. And if you want to know just how contagious those bugs can be, just ask the National Basketball Association.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention gives the play-by-play on an outbreak of gastrointestinal misery that afflicted as many as 13 NBA teams a year ago, spreading rapidly from player to player and from players to team staffers.

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The Two-Way
10:52 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Cardinals Manager La Russa Retires

Cardinals manager Tony La Russa celebrated with the World Series trophy Friday night in St Louis.

Charlie Riedle Pool-Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 4:18 pm

Tony La Russa, who just managed the St. Louis Cardinals to the World Series title, announced this morning that he's retiring after 33 seasons.

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Opinion
10:52 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Major League Longing: What Comes After Game Seven

jcornelius viaFlickr

Glenn Stout has served as the editor of the Best American Sports Writing series since 1991. His latest book is Fenway 1912: The Birth of a Ballpark, a Championship Season, and Fenway's Remarkable First Year.

Baseball is over again and — for a while — so am I.

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The Two-Way
10:32 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Trapped In A Jet For 7 Hours, 'We Were All Slowly Losing It'

The snowy scene Sunday in Glastonbury, Conn.

Jessica Hill AP

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 2:07 pm

The major problems after the weekend's surprising snowstorm in the Northeast relate to a couple of million customers who are without power.

But one of the other stories we can relate to is about the passengers who were stranded on the ground Saturday in jets that landed at Bradley International Airport near Hartford, Conn.

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The Salt
10:01 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Chefs Say Variety Meats, Or Offal, Aren't Just For Halloween

Chef Daniel O'Brien slices the pig ear terrine he made for the "Scary Bits" dinner at his Season Pantry supper club in Washington, D.C.

Melissa Forsyth for NPR

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 2:02 pm

On the surface, it's easy to dismiss this menu as a mere Halloween stunt: duck hearts, cow tongues, lamb kidneys, pig ears and even testicles.

But chef Daniel O'Brien, who runs the Seasonal Pantry supper club in Washington, D.C., and hosted a "Scary Bits" dinner this weekend, is one of a growing number of innovative American chefs who are incorporating "variety meats," or offal, into everyday menus.

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The Two-Way
9:35 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Looks Like Thieves Used Fighting To Cover Theft Of Libyan Treasures

During the fighting last spring in Benghazi, Libya, between forces loyal to then-dictator Moammar Gadhafi and the opposition, there was a fire at one of the city's banks.

The blaze was blamed on the fighting.

Now, as the BBC and other news outlets are reporting, there's word that "more than 7,000 priceless coins and other precious artifacts were taken" in what's now thought to have been a robbery planned by thieves who took advantage of the chaos in the city to hit the bank.

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It's All Politics
9:00 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Herman Cain's Long Odds Get Lengthier After Sex Harassment Report

Herman Cain on CBS' "Face the Nation" in Washington Sunday, Oct. 30, 2011.

Chris Usher AP

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 11:48 am

It should have been another good weekend for Herman Cain. It wasn't.

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Planet Money
8:51 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Is Europe's Bailout 'A Gigantic Con Game'?

Italy needs the backing of Europe's bailout fund. But Italy's a huge economy — much, much bigger than Greece, Portugal, and Ireland combined. And the Europeans don't want to put enough money into their bailout fund to back Italy.

So they're getting creative.

The rest of Europe is likely offer investors insurance that will pay back the first 20 percent of any losses on new Italian bonds.

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The Two-Way
8:42 am
Mon October 31, 2011

7 Billion People? Yes, Give Or Take 56 Million

Several babies born today have been deemed the symbolic 7 billionth person — including a little girl named Nargis in Lucknow, India. Here she is with her mother, Vinita.

Rajesh Kumar Singh AP

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 8:44 am

As NPR and just about every other news outlet report about the milestone that United Nations experts estimate the world passed today — a population of 7 billion people — there's this from the BBC:

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The Two-Way
8:21 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Top Stories: Cain, Storm, Occupy Arrests

The Two-Way
8:06 am
Mon October 31, 2011

No Treat: About Two Million Still Without Power In Northeast

This tree split in two due to heavy snow on its branches in Belmont, Mass.

Michael Dwyer AP

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 2:05 pm

That unusually early winter storm that struck the Northeast over the weekend, dumping up to 30 inches of wet heavy snow in some places, has left a couple million customers without electricity because snapped limbs and falling trees brought down power lines across New England.

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Planet Money
7:33 am
Mon October 31, 2011

The New EU Rescue Fund: Where Will Money Come From?

A $1.4 trillion rescue fund is a central part of the deal reached by European leaders to stave off financial catastrophe on the continent. But there are many big question marks about the fund.

The Two-Way
7:32 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Reporter: Herman Cain Story Based On Documentation, Dozens Of Sources

Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain at The National Press Club today (Oct. 31, 2011).

Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 2:03 pm

"I have never sexually harassed anyone," Republican presidential contender Herman Cain told Fox News Channel this morning. The former business executive said he was "falsely accused" of harassment "while I was at the National Restaurant Association" in the early 1990s.

Cain, appearing on Fox just after 11:20 a.m. ET, said that if the restaurant association, where he served as CEO from late-1996 to mid-1999, paid any accusers to settle such claims, "I wasn't even aware of it and I hope it wasn't for much."

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Strange News
7:22 am
Mon October 31, 2011

London Cash Machine Has Cockney Language Option

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Strange News
7:18 am
Mon October 31, 2011

World Series Fan Gives Back Game Six Homer Ball

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 8:44 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

A baseball fan named David Huyette used a word you don't hear so much. The word was honorable. Mr. Huyette ended up holding the homerun ball that won Game 6 of the World Series for the St. Louis Cardinals. It could've been worth thousands, but Mr. Huyette returned the historic ball. He said it was the honorable thing to do. And he was rewarded with another baseball, an autographed bat and tickets to Game 7 of the World Series. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Election 2012
5:40 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Black, Latino Shifts In Chicago Lead To Map Flap

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 8:44 pm

It's been map-drawing time all across the country, as cities and states create new districts for state lawmakers, members of Congress and city council members based on 2010 Census numbers.

In Chicago, where African-Americans left in droves during the past decade and the Latino population rose, leaders are redrawing the boundaries of the city's 50 wards. What's at stake is representation and political clout.

Population Changes

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Television
5:32 am
Mon October 31, 2011

'Rock Center': Serving Hard News, But Will It Sell?

Brian Williams will set the course for the new NBC newsmagazine Rock Center. The network is positioning it as a serious news program — and expecting a ratings struggle, at least at first.

Justin Stephens NBC Universal

At 10 p.m. on Monday, NBC anchor Brian Williams will do something that hasn't been done in nearly 20 years: launch a new network TV newsmagazine.

Hosted live from NBC's Rockefeller Center headquarters — thus the name, Rock Center — it's an ambitious attempt to showcase both Williams' serious news skills and his signature dry wit. And if it's going to succeed, he and NBC may have to reinvent the newsmagazine for a new age.

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Law
5:29 am
Mon October 31, 2011

High Court Considers When Bad Lawyers Taint A Case

The Supreme Court hears two cases about ineffective lawyers on Monday.

J. Scott Applewhite AP

On television, most criminal cases are tried before a jury. But in reality, more than 90 percent of all criminal cases in the United States never get to trial; they are resolved with a plea bargain. For the state, these bargains save money and resources, and they often include agreements that the defendant will help prosecutors make other cases. But plea bargains have also been criticized as a boon for real criminals who have information to bargain with, while little guys, with nothing to trade, can get mauled by the system.

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Performing Arts
5:28 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Houdini Relative Unlocks Some Family Secrets

Theodore Hardeen (right) poses with brother Harry Houdini around 1901. Although Hardeen was the less-famous brother, he was also a magician and escape artist who continued to perform Houdini's routines after his death.

Courtesy of John Cox wildabouthoudini.com

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:20 am

You'd think if you were a relative of someone as famous as Harry Houdini, you'd know it. But George Hardeen, 59, didn't find out he was Houdini's great-nephew until he was a teenager.

His grandfather was Houdini's brother, Theo Hardeen, also an escape artist. At one point, the brothers performed together. Houdini and his wife, Bess, had no children, and when he died — on Halloween, 85 years ago — he willed all of his props to Theo.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:52 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Losing Weight: A Battle Against Fat And Biology

One recent study found that people were able to burn up an extra 450 calories a day with one hour of moderate exercise. That can include walking briskly, biking or swimming.

iStockphoto.com

Part of an ongoing series on obesity in America

If you're among the two-thirds of Americans who are overweight, chances are you've had people tell you to just ease up on the eating and use a little self-control. It does, of course, boil down to "calories in, calories out."

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7 Billion And Counting
4:42 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Visualizing How A Population Grows To 7 Billion

Watch as global population explodes from 300 million to 7 billion.

Adam Cole, Maggie Starbard NPR

The U.N. estimates that the world's population will pass the 7 billion mark on Monday.

Much of that growth has happened in Asia — in India and China. Those two countries have been among the world's most populous for centuries. But a demographic shift is taking place as the countries have modernized and lowered their fertility rates. Now, the biggest growth is taking place in sub-Saharan Africa.

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7 Billion And Counting
4:39 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Nations Grow Populations, And Face New Problems

Lujiazui, Shanghai's financial district, includes the world's third- and sixth-tallest buildings. The city's population is 23 million.

Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Wed November 2, 2011 12:34 pm

NPR's Frank Langfitt has spent the past year reporting in two countries where the populations and the problems could not be more different: South Sudan and China.

The best way to travel in South Sudan is by plane. That's because, in a nation nearly the size of Texas, there are hardly any paved roads.

Earlier this year, I flew to Akobo County, near the Ethiopian border. On the hour-plus flight, I saw cattle herders and acacia trees, but mostly empty landscape. There was little sign of the 21st century — or the 20th.

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Around the Nation
4:33 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Thousands Of Trucking Jobs, But Few Take The Wheel

A truck driver cleans his windshield at a filling station in Milford, Conn. The long hours, weeks away from home and mediocre pay contribute to the trucking industry's shortage of an estimated 125,000 drivers.

Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 8:44 pm

Tough as it is to find work these days, tens of thousands of jobs paying middle-class wages are going unfilled.

Open truck-driving jobs require little more than a high school diploma and a month or so of training. But not everybody wants to be a long-haul truck driver, and many who do find they just can't hack it.

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