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The Two-Way
7:49 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Are You Among The '99 Percent?'

The scene at an Occupy Los Angeles demonstration earlier this month.

Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 3:05 pm

As the Occupy Wall Street movement continues to spread, one of its rallying cries is generating a fair amount of debate.

The protesters say they represent the "99 percent" — that is, everyone except the richest 1 percent of Americans or those who have been benefiting from the way things are going.

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Around the Nation
7:10 am
Fri October 7, 2011

'Life-Like' Polamalu Frightens Wax Museum Fans

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 10:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

If you don't already find wax museums a bit creepy, this might convince you. NFL star Troy Polamalu is famous for his long, black curls. And it's quite plausible he would be among the lifelike statues in Hollywood's Madam Tussauds. So when visitors sidled up for a souvenir photo with the wax figure in a Steelers jersey, they got a shock. It was alive. It was Polamalu in the flesh shooting a commercial and playing a prank. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:01 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Rural Western Pennsylvania Bridge Goes Missing

The bridge was stolen sometime between Sept. 27 and Oct. 5. Police suspect thieves dismantled it to sell as scrap metal. It was made of corrugated steel valued at about $100,000.

The Two-Way
6:45 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Today's Top Stories: Nobel Peace Prize, September Jobs Report

Good morning.

We've already posted about the top story so far today:

Nobel Peace Prize Goes To Women Striving For Peace In Liberia And Yemen

And we're getting ready for what's expected to be the other major news of the morning — the 8:30 a.m. ET announcement from the Bureau of Labor Statistics about the September unemployment rate and how many jobs were or were not added to payrolls last month.

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The Two-Way
4:45 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Nobel Peace Prize About To Be Announced

Left to right: Nobel Peace Prize laureates President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia, Liberian "peace warrior" Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkul Karman of Yemen.

AP

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 11:54 am

Three women who have worked for peace and women's rights in Liberia and Yemen have been awarded the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize, it was just announced at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo.

Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Liberian peace activist Leymah Roberta Gbowee and Yemeni protest leader Tawakkul Karman are being honored.

This year's Nobels come with about $1.5 million. That amount will be divided between the three laureates.

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National Security
4:29 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Partisan Divide On National Security Shrinks

GOP presidential contender Mitt Romney travels to the Citadel in South Carolina to deliver a speech on national security Friday. The issue has traditionally been a bright line between hawks and doves, Republicans and Democrats. But even on this, the third anniversary of President Obama winning the Nobel Peace Prize, the politics are no longer clear cut.

NPR Story
4:00 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Obama Wants Wall Street Protesters To Back His Jobs Plan

Loosely-organized protests that began on Wall Street last month have now spread to other cities across the country. President Obama says he understands the frustration conveyed by prostesters. He's trying to channel public anger with Wall Street into support for his own financial policies.

NPR Story
4:00 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Remembering How Steve Jobs Changed The Design World

Apple's Steve Jobs, who died this week after battling a rare form of pancreatic cancer, didn't just change technology. Lynn Neary learns more about the profound legacy Jobs leaves behind on the world of design from John Maeda, president of the Rhode Island School of Design.

NPR Story
4:00 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Pakistani Doctor Who Helped CIA May Face Treason Trial

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 10:55 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, host: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary. Steve Inskeep is away.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: And I'm Renee Montagne.

When the U.S. tracked down and killed Osama bin Laden in his hiding place in northwest Pakistan, it chose to keep the Pakistani army and its intelligence service in the dark about that mission. The fact that Pakistan was caught with the world's most wanted man living within walking distance of a premiere military academy humiliated and angered many in the country.

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Economy
4:00 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Mortgage Rates Hit Record Low

Mortgage rates are now below 4 percent. The average 30 year fixed rate loan is at an all time low. But high unemployment, weak consumer confidence, and tougher standards for getting credit, are keeping many Americans from buying homes.

Business
4:00 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Banks To Raise Debit Card Fees

Lynn Neary talks to Ron Lieber, personal finance columnist for "The New York Times," about debit card fees.

Middle East
3:55 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Palestinians Feel Effects Of Frozen U.S. Aid

Palestinian protesters hold anti-U.S. placards during a demonstration in the West Bank city of Ramallah on Oct. 4 following the U.S. decision to cut off aid funds to the Palestinian Authority.

Abbas Momani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 11:45 am

The Obama administration is urging Congress to rescind a decision blocking some aid to the Palestinians.

The congressional decision to put a hold on $200 million of aid money was prompted by the Palestinian Authority's bid for statehood recognition at the United Nations — something both the administration and Congress oppose. The funding cut is already having an impact in the Palestinian territories.

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Middle East
12:01 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Iran Charges Student Who Was In the U.S.

Omid Kokabee, an Iranian who was studying physics at the University of Texas, Austin, was arrested when he returned home to Iran for a family visit. He went on trial in Tehran this week on charges related to espionage.

Courtesy of The Daily Texan

An Iranian who was studying physics in Texas went on trial in Tehran this week on charges related to espionage.

Omid Kokabee, 29, a graduate student at the University of Texas, Austin, went home to Iran to visit his family back in February. When Kokabee failed to return to Austin, his friends discovered he had been jailed and charged in Iran with communicating with a hostile government and taking illegal funds.

His case is only now becoming public knowledge, just a few weeks after Iran released two young Americans accused of espionage and held for more than two years.

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Economy
12:01 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Long-Term Unemployment's Strain On The Job Search

A job seeker makes a list of his skills during a workshop in Burlingame, Calif., targeted toward people who have been out of work for at least six months. According to the Labor Department, there are now more than 2 million people who have been jobless for at least two years.

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 12:05 pm

Long-term joblessness is one of the unfortunate legacies of the recession. Earlier this year, the Labor Department started tracking longer periods of unemployment. According to that data, there are now more than 2 million people who have been jobless for at least two years, and 700,000 of those have been looking for work for at least three years.

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StoryCorps
12:01 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Remembering A Man And A Marriage

Mary says she knew Thomas was the one for her by the way he treated his mother.

StoryCorps

Thomas Morris worked for nearly 30 years at the Brentwood Post Office in Washington, D.C.

"When he would get off work, he would get home in the early morning and we would go out to eat breakfast at 2, 3, 4 o'clock in the morning," his wife, Mary, says.

The couple married on May 1, 1991, within 90 days of meeting each other at his mother's funeral. Mary says she was impressed by how well he had looked after his mother.

"And you know if a man treats his mother right, he's going to treat his wife right," she explains during a visit to StoryCorps in Beach Park, Ill.

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Author Interviews
12:01 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Barry Eisler's 'Detachment' From 'Legacy' Publishing

Barry Eisler is a former CIA operative turned thriller writer. His latest book, The Detachment, was e-released on Amazon in September.

Courtesy Barry Eisler

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 12:38 pm

Thriller writer Barry Eisler has turned his back on traditional publishing — or as he calls it, legacy publishing. His latest book, The Detachment, was released as an e-book in September. It comes out in paperback in October. Both versions are published by Amazon.

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Author Interviews
12:01 am
Fri October 7, 2011

'Gardener' Gives 'Heirloom Life' To Forgotten Flora

The Yokohama squash was first introduced to North America around 1860 by James Hogg of Yorkville, N.Y. after his brother, Thomas, sent him the seeds from Japan.

Jeremiah C. Gettle and Emilee Freie Gettle Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Co. LLC

As a child growing up on his family's farm in the 1980s, Jere Gettle didn't spend his evenings watching TV; instead, he read seed catalogs. To him, the endless varieties of seeds with exotic sounding names were full of possibility. He loved the idea of planting them in the ground, tending the crops that grew from them and preparing the harvested vegetables for a family meal.

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Economy
12:01 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Does The Economy Need A Little Inflation?

Though most central bankers hate inflation, policies that promote inflation may boost the U.S. economy, some economists say.

Ken Rogoff, former chief economist at the International Monetary Fund, says the Federal Reserve's efforts to boost growth haven't worked and the central bank needs to be more forceful.

"They need to be willing, in fact actively pursue, letting inflation rise a bit more," says Rogoff, who is now a professor at Harvard. "That would encourage consumption. It would encourage investment. It would bring housing prices into line."

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Rick Perry
12:01 am
Fri October 7, 2011

For Rick Perry, A Restless Life On The Farm

Rick Perry's parents still live on Farm Market Road 618.

Don Gonyea NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:21 am

Second in a series

Rick Perry first won public office in 1984, when he was elected to the Texas House of Representatives. In that and in every campaign since, he has run as a man shaped by his time working a dryland farm.

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Politics
12:01 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Some Latinos See Obama 'Betrayal' On Immigration

Last summer, immigration rights activists in Los Angeles gathered for a rally calling on the government to act on immigration overhaul legislation. Strong Latino support helped President Obama win in 2008, but his support among those voters is slipping.

Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

President Obama came into office with strong Latino support, having won two-thirds of the Latino vote, according to exit polls. But for some, that support has turned to disillusionment.

"There's a deep sense of betrayal and disappointment towards the Obama administration," said Sarahi Uribe, coordinator of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network.

Indeed, the latest Gallup poll shows his support among Latino voters has fallen to 48 percent, a new low.

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Herman Cain
12:01 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Can Herman Cain Keep It Going?

Businessman and GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain has been taking advantage of his recent rise to fame. Since he won the Florida straw poll late last month, he is everywhere: appearing on Sunday talk shows, promoting his new book and taking every opportunity to try to maintain his momentum.

People like the way he talks. His frank, motivational style has come out in GOP debates and in speeches.

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The Two-Way
7:06 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

U.S. Tells California's Pot Shops To Close Down, Or Face Charges

Jars full of medical marijuana are seen at a medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles. U.S. attorneys sent letters telling more than a dozen of the shops to shut down.

Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Pot dispensaries have flourished in California, one of 16 states where the use of medical marijuana is legal. But the federal government is now giving some of the state's pot shops 45 days to close down.

The state's four U.S. attorneys gave notice to at least 16 stores that they must close, or face criminal charges and the seizure of their property, according to the Associated Press.

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Television
6:32 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

'The League' Uses Fandom To Explore Friendship

From left to right: John Lajoie, Stephan Rannazzisi and Mark Duplass, from the first season of 'The League'. The new season airs Thursday, Oct. 6 on FX.

Patrick McElhenney FX Network

The stereotypical Fantasy Football fan is a 30-something suburban man-child. And the FX program The League is about their ilk. But even though fantasy football is what brings several friends together in the TV show, you don't have to be a fantasy football fan to enjoy it.

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The Two-Way
5:45 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

Dwarf-Tossing, Long Banned, May Return In Florida

State Rep. Ritch Workman, seen here speaking in 2010, has filed a bill to make dwarf tossing legal once again in Florida.

Mark Foley Fla. House of Representatives

News that a Florida legislator wants to bring back the banned activity of "dwarf tossing" has people shaking their heads, and wondering why in the world you would want to do something like that. Of course, they're also curious as to whether he'll succeed.

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Asia
5:23 pm
Thu October 6, 2011

Something's Fishy About Chinese Hairy Crabs

Hairy crabs are extremely popular in China. These were in a market in the eastern province of Jiangsu.

China Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 11, 2011 10:57 am

Fake products permeate nearly every corner of China's economy. Earlier this year, the trend seemed to reach a new low when phony Apple stores were exposed in southwestern China.

Each fall, the fakery even extends to the world of seafood and East China's Yangcheng Lake, which is just a short train ride from Shanghai. Yangcheng is home to what are reputed to be China's tastiest and most expensive hairy crabs.

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