Kathy Lohr

Whether covering the manhunt and eventual capture of Eric Robert Rudolph in the mountains of North Carolina, the remnants of the Oklahoma City federal building with its twisted metal frame and shattered glass, flood-ravaged Midwestern communities, or the terrorist bombings across the country, including the blast that exploded in Centennial Olympic Park in downtown Atlanta, correspondent Kathy Lohr has been at the heart of stories all across the nation.

Lohr was NPR's first reporter based in the Midwest. She opened NPR's St. Louis office in 1990 and the Atlanta bureau in 1996. Lohr covers the abortion issue on an ongoing basis for NPR, including political and legal aspects. She has often been sent into disasters as they are happening, to provide listeners with the intimate details about how these incidents affect people and their lives.

Lohr filed her first report for NPR while working for member station KCUR in Kansas City, Missouri. She graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia, and began her journalism career in commercial television and radio as a reporter/anchor. Lohr also became involved in video production for national corporations and taught courses in television reporting and radio production at universities in Kansas and Missouri. She has filed reports for the NPR documentary program Horizons, the BBC, the CBC, Marketplace, and she was published in the Saturday Evening Post.

Lohr won the prestigious Missouri Medal of Honor for Excellence in Journalism in 2002. She received a fellowship from Vanderbilt University for work on the issue of domestic violence. Lohr has filed reports from 27 states and the District of Columbia. She has received other national awards for her coverage of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games, the Oklahoma City bombing, the Midwestern floods of 1993, and for her reporting on ice storms in the Mississippi Delta. She has also received numerous awards for radio pieces on the local level prior to joining NPR's national team. Lohr was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska. She now lives in her adopted hometown of Atlanta, covering stories across the southeastern part of the country.

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Newt Gingrich
3:44 am
Tue February 21, 2012

Georgia On His Mind, Gingrich Faces Key Primary

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich waves during a campaign stop Friday in Peachtree City, Ga. Doing well in the state's primary is important for Gingrich because he represented a congressional district there for 20 years.
Evan Vucci AP

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is facing his most important challenge yet — winning Georgia on Super Tuesday. Georgia is considered Gingrich's home because he represented parts of the state in Congress for 20 years, but he hasn't lived there for more than a decade.

Over the weekend, Gingrich held several rallies, including one in Peachtree City, south of Atlanta, where he stressed that this area has long supported him.

"It is great to be home," Gingrich told the crowd. "I believe that I carried Fayette County in every single election, including the two that I lost."

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Election 2012
4:05 pm
Fri January 20, 2012

In Backing Romney, Haley Seen As Political Enigma

Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney and his wife Ann wish a happy birthday to South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley (left) at Romney's campaign headquarters in Charleston, S.C., on Thursday.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, one of the Tea Party's early superstars, has seen her approval ratings fall, and some of her core supporters are baffled by Haley's endorsement of former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.

Haley won election in 2010 as a true fiscal conservative, capturing the endorsement of Sarah Palin, who said Haley was willing to challenge the good old boys of the state's politics.

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Business
2:38 am
Tue January 17, 2012

Move Over, Delta: Southwest To Fly Out Of Atlanta

Two Southwest Airlines jets are seen in front of a taxiing Delta jet at Philadelphia International Airport in 2004.
George Widman AP

Originally published on Tue January 17, 2012 8:46 am

Southwest Airlines prides itself on being different from other carriers. Next month, it's going to have to highlight those differences when it starts flying out of Atlanta — home to Delta Air Lines and the country's busiest airport, Hartsfield-Jackson International.

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Health
4:02 pm
Mon January 9, 2012

Controversy Swirls Around Harsh Anti-Obesity Ads

In one of the print ads in Children's Healthcare of Atlanta's Strong4Life campaign, a young girl says she doesn't like going to school, because "all the other kids pick on me. It hurts my feelings."
Courtesy of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 8:17 pm

Stark billboards and television commercials that feature overweight kids are part of a controversial anti-obesity campaign in Atlanta. The goal of the "Stop Sugarcoating It, Georgia" ads is to shock families into recognizing that obesity is a problem.

The campaign is making an impact, but the tactics are raising questions.

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Newt Gingrich
5:05 pm
Thu December 22, 2011

As Gingrich Stumps In Iowa, His Style Evolves

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich's campaign has been down and then up this year.

His top staffers resigned en masse in June, leading many to wonder whether he was out of the race. Then came debates in which the former speaker of the House shined.

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Still No Job: Over A Year Without Enough Work
4:03 pm
Wed December 21, 2011

Who Gives The Long-Term Jobless A Helping Hand?

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 9:15 pm

More than 40 percent of the long-term unemployed say they've received a lot of help from family and friends. But only 1 in 10 reports getting much help from churches or community groups, according to an NPR/Kaiser Family Foundation poll.

While family may be the first stop for help, these groups say they're indeed seeing large numbers of people who have been out of work a long time.

'We're Overwhelmed Now'

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Election 2012
6:30 am
Wed December 21, 2011

Romney, Gingrich Spar Over Negative Super PAC Ads

There's a spirited debate going on between GOP presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich. A Super PAC called Restore Our Future is running negative ads against Gingrich on Romney's behalf. Gingrich called on Romney to get the ads off the air. Romney responded by saying the law does not allow him to communicate with a Super PAC.

Election 2012
4:00 am
Tue December 20, 2011

Gingrich Holds Iowa Town Hall Meeting

GOP presidential candidate Newt Gingrich is accusing his Republican opponents of what he says is reprehensible behavior — running attack ads in Iowa against the former House Speaker. Before a crowd of supporters in Hiawatha, Iowa, Gingrich stressed that the negative GOP attack ads are bad for the party and bad for voters.

Politics
7:41 am
Sat December 3, 2011

Gingrich's Popularity: A Winning Boost?

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich has seen a recent bump in the polls. More criticism is sure to come, but Gingrich says he doesn't think attacks from other candidates will be effective.
Richard Shiro AP

Originally published on Sat December 3, 2011 8:36 pm

Newt Gingrich is now the focus of the race to become the GOP presidential nominee — and with that comes the heat. His main opposition, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney went on the attack Friday, but Gingrich insists he'll stay positive. The big question is whether the former House speaker can sustain his surge in the polls.

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It's All Politics
3:40 pm
Wed November 30, 2011

In South Carolina, A Resurgent Gingrich Attracts Jubilant Crowds

House Speaker Newt Gingrich talks with Rep. John Kasich of Ohio while President Bill Clinton signs the Balanced Budget Agreement on the South Lawn of the White House in 1997.
PAUL J. RICHARDS AFP/Getty Images

Newt Gingrich traveled across South Carolina this week appearing at a number of town-hall-style meetings where he talked to voters and answered questions — mostly the same questions at every stop. He talked about the improving the economy, creating a new immigration policy, repealing President Obama's health care reform plan and transforming Washington.

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Job 1: Careers That Shaped The GOP Candidates
3:15 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

In Gingrich's Past, A Lesson On Ambition

Newt Gingrich is shown teaching a class at West Georgia College (now known as the University of West Georgia) in the 1970s. As a politician, he has long stressed his background as a scholar.
Courtesy of Gingrich Productions

Last in a series

Newt Gingrich was in his 20s when he was hired at West Georgia College as a history professor. He had just returned from Belgium, where he was doing research for his doctoral dissertation.

"He was very much a person of intellect," says Mel Steeley, who taught history at the college for four decades and helped bring Gingrich to the school in 1970. "He would wander across campus and didn't notice people. He'd have something in his mind, always be thinking about something. When he first came, you kind of wondered if he was a student or a professor."

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Politics
10:16 am
Mon November 7, 2011

Win Or Lose, DuPree Makes History In Mississippi

The mayor of Hattiesburg, Miss., Democrat Johnny DuPree, is the first black candidate to win a major party's nomination for governor in the state since Reconstruction. He's a long shot in the election against a well-funded lieutenant governor, Republican Phil Bryant. DuPree is not focusing on race, saying he'd rather talk about issues and his leadership skills.

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Law
4:50 am
Wed November 2, 2011

Miss. Set To Vote On Measure Making Fetus A Person

An anti-abortion activist holds a sign at the annual March for Life event in Washington, D.C. Mississippi's statehood amendment would ban abortion with no exceptions for rape or incest.

Alex Wong Getty Images

Next week Mississippi voters will decide whether to pass a constitutional amendment that redefines a person. Under the proposal, fertilized human eggs would be considered human beings, which would ban all abortions in the state. But abortion-rights activists say it would also limit contraception and threaten fertility treatments.

Les Riley has worked on the initiative for years, gathering signatures to get it on the ballot. Now, in northwest Mississippi, he's talking to voters and assembling yard signs that urge the passage of Amendment 26.

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Job 1: Careers That Shaped The GOP Candidates
12:01 am
Wed October 19, 2011

In White House Run, Cain Counts On Corporate Skill

Herman Cain became a vice president at Pillsbury, left that job and started over at Burger King, where he climbed the corporate ladder again. Eventually, he became CEO of Godfather's Pizza, which he is credited with turning.

Robert Paskach The Omaha World-Herald

Fourth in a series

Herman Cain grew up in Atlanta, graduated from Morehouse College and worked briefly for the Navy. He got a master's degree in computer science and worked in that field at Coca-Cola for a while.

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Herman Cain
12:01 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Can Herman Cain Keep It Going?

Businessman and GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain has been taking advantage of his recent rise to fame. Since he won the Florida straw poll late last month, he is everywhere: appearing on Sunday talk shows, promoting his new book and taking every opportunity to try to maintain his momentum.

People like the way he talks. His frank, motivational style has come out in GOP debates and in speeches.

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Around the Nation
5:37 pm
Tue October 4, 2011

Mississippi's Jobs Program: A New National Model?

Brian Vandevender says a tough economic market prevented him from getting a good job until the state brought back the program it calls STEPS 2 last month. He just got a position working for a company that makes auto parts and supplies and hopes it will turn into a full-time job when STEPS ends in December.

Kathy Lohr NPR

As President Obama sells his jobs initiative across the country, people in Mississippi point to a program they say is already creating jobs. Mississippi has attracted attention because economists like the way the state got employers to share the cost of hiring workers.

Under the Subsidized Transitional Employment Program and Services, or STEPS for short, the state pays part of the cost of workers' salaries in the hopes that the subsidy will lead to full-time jobs.

Some analysts say this could be a national model, but it comes with a price tag.

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Law
12:01 am
Wed September 21, 2011

Georgia Is Poised To Execute Davis, 22 Years Later

During a 2008 protest in support of death row inmate Troy Davis, people in Paris' Place de la Concorde hold signs urging clemency for Davis, convicted of killing a police officer in 1989.
Mehdi Fedouach AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 21, 2011 4:49 pm

After years of appeals and controversy, Troy Anthony Davis is scheduled to be executed in Georgia on Wednesday. Georgia's board of pardons turned back Davis' appeal for clemency Tuesday, despite high-profile support for his claim that he did not kill a police officer in 1989.

Several witnesses have changed their testimony since Davis' trial; tens of thousands are protesting the execution. Former president Jimmy Carter, South African Bishop Desmond Tutu and more than 50 members of Congress are among those who have asked Georgia to commute Davis' death sentence.

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