Rick Pluta

Managing Editor, Michigan Public Radio Network

State Representative Cindy Gamrat offered a tearful public apology Fridayfor poor personal choices, but says she didn’t break any laws, and she is not about to resign. 

A group of unions has launched a petition drive to double Michigan’s corporate income tax and use the additional revenue for roads. 

A federal appeals court says US marshals in Detroit were on the wrong side of the law when they tried to deny a newspaper access to booking photos of Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick and police officers accused of corruption. 

Melissa Gilbert, who gained fame playing Laura Ingalls on TV’s Little House on the Prairie, says she’s running for a mid-Michigan congressional seat as a Democrat.

Lawnmower
Creative Commons

A homeowner in Howell has to pay the city for cutting the grass in the public right of way in front of his house. That’s the decision  Wednesday from a federal appeals court. 

Mackinac Pipeline
Greg Varnum/Wikimedia Commons

The National Wildlife Federation says it’s making plans to sue the federal government. The environmental group says the US Department of Transportation is not enforcing a law that requires “worst-case” disaster plans for underwater pipelines to be on file.

A union-led petition drive is trying to increase the state’s Corporate Income Tax rate from 6 percent to 11 percent. The revenue would be used to fix roads.

Ann Arbor-Saline Road
Andrew Cluley / 89.1 WEMU

The Legislature is on a summer break until mid-August. The House and the Senate both adjourned today (Tue.) with no quorums and no votes on road funding.

Rick Snyder
Michigan Public Radio Network

Governor Rick Snyder says he hasn’t given up on getting a deal for more than a $1 billion dollars in new road revenue through the Legislature. Lawmakers adjourned this week without voting on a roads package.

Governor Rick Snyder says he hasn’t given up on getting a deal for more than a $1 billion dollars in new road revenue through the Legislature. Lawmakers adjourned this week without voting on a roads package.

The state of Michigan is terminating its contract with Aramark to provide prison food services.

A recent report could serve as a blueprint for overhauling the state corrections system and saving taxpayers money. It aligns with Governor Rick Snyder’s plans to save money on prisons, not winning support from the Legislature is a different story.

Some Democrats in the Legislature are renewing their push to increase the minimum wage for workers who earn tips. They say there should be one minimum wage that covers the entire workforce.        

Governor Rick Snyder  tells a business conference on Mackinac Island that training and getting people interested in skilled trades is his top economic development priority.       

  

Michigan wildlife officials say they've detected chronic wasting disease among free-ranging deer in mid-Michigan. Chronic wasting disease is a contagious disease that can decimate deer herds if left unchecked.

Construction
Flickr / jakelv7500

A special state House committee has started to look for ways to pay for roads and transportation after voters overwhelmingly said “NO” to Proposal One. 

Gov. Rick Snyder outlined a public safety agenda on Monday that includes parole and sentencing reforms, job training for inmates, and more help finding a job once they’re released from prison.

Snyder says there are data-driven ways to reduce the state’s prison population without compromising public safety.

A state Senate committee has adopted a Republican proposal to scrap prevailing union wage requirements on publicly funded construction projects. The bills now go to the Senate floor.

State House Republicans could introduce legislation to boost road funding as soon as this week.

Rick Snyder
Michigan Public Radio Network

Voters said no Tuesday to Proposal One by a margin of almost four-to-one. But, as unhappy as people were with the ballot question, they’re still unhappy with the state of Michigan’s roads. So Governor Rick Snyder and lawmakers say they’ll go back to work on finding money for roads – and they will heed the lessons of Proposal One.

Wikipedia

Since January, Governor Rick Snyder has been traveling the state with his rock collection – more accurately, hunks of concrete, asphalt, and brick from crumbling roads and bridges.  

“This is a piece of Michigan road,” he says he holds up a chunk of concrete twice as big as his fist. “This is the kind of thing that can fall on your vehicle or go through your windshield. That’s scary folks.”

The governor spent the last full day before voting begins on those scary roads trying to convince voters to support Proposal One.

Voters are about to decide whether to raise Michigan’s sales tax from 6 percent to 7 percent. If they approve Proposal One, that generates $1.3 billion to fix roads and another $300 to $400 for schools and local services. If it’s voted down, Governor Snyder and the Legislature go back to the drawing board. 

Eighteen schools in Detroit were closed Thursday due to staffing shortages. Teachers and other school personnel took the day off to head to Lansing to protest Governor Rick Snyder’s plan to overhaul the district. The plan includes enabling more charter schools to open in the city. 

Rick Pluta / MPRN

  Crowds gathered as the US Supreme Court prepared to arguments on whether same-sex marriage bans like Michigan’s violate the Constitution.

A line of people camped out for several days hoping to get into the historic arguments before the Supreme Court.

For April DeBoer, it’s been a bit longer.

 A state Senate committee will hold a hearing tomorrow (Tue.) on legislation that could limit the reach of a US Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage. State Senator Rick Jones chairs the Senate Judiciary Committee, which will hear testimony on a proposed Michigan Religious Freedom Restoration Act. But Jones says no vote is expected on the legislation – in part because Governor Rick Snyder doesn’t support it.

A state Senate panel has OK’d bills that would allow faith-based private adoption agencies that take public funds to turn away same-sex couples.

The bills come as the US Supreme Court is about to hear arguments on whether Michigan’s ban on same-sex marriage violates the Constitution. A decision is expected this summer.

Faith-based agencies say they shouldn’t be forced to violate their religious beliefs if the court strikes down the marriage ban. And, they say, some faith-based services may simply close their doors.

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