Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Straight from Russian President Vladimir Putin's mouth: "I would like to say — there's no need to be afraid of Russia."

Putin's comments to the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera follow months of fighting in Ukraine between Kiev's forces and Russian-backed separatists that have reminded many of the Cold War, when the Soviet Union seemed perpetually on the verge of invading Western Europe and the forces of NATO were the only thing standing in the way.

A court in Egypt has overturned a ruling that named Hamas a terrorist organization. Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, has welcomed the move.

The decision by the Urgent Matters Appeals Court said the lower court had lacked jurisdiction.

The Associated Press quotes Sami Abu Zuhri, a spokesman for Hamas in Gaza, as saying the latest court ruling would have "positive consequences on the relationship between Hamas and Egypt."

Updated at 12:35 p.m. ET

Beau Biden, the eldest son of the vice president, a former Delaware attorney general and an Iraq War veteran, is being laid to rest today following his death a week ago from brain cancer. President Obama called him "an original" and talked of the husband, father and "the rare politician who collected more fans than foes."

Saudi Arabia shot down a Scud missile fired by Houthi rebels in neighboring Yemen that was targeted at one of the kingdom's largest air bases.

NPR's Deborah Amos, reporting from Riyadh, said the Cold War-era Scud was taken down by the U.S.-supplied Patriot missile defense system.

The thwarted rebel attack comes after three Saudi soldiers and a border guard were killed in an earlier border skirmish, she says.

The death toll in the capsizing of a cruise ship in China's Yangtze River has risen to just under 400, making it the deadliest maritime disaster in seven decades in the country.

China's state-run Xinhua news agency says hundreds more bodies have been recovered since the overturned Eastern Star was righted on Friday, bringing the total confirmed dead to 396. Among the newly recovered bodies was that of a 3-year-old girl.

The Archdiocese of St. Paul has been criminally charged with allegedly turning a "blind eye" to sexual abuse against minor boys by former priest Curtis Wehmeyer, who pleaded guilty in 2012.

Updated Saturday 1:45 a.m. ET:

A total of 11 bodies have been recovered after an earthquake triggered an avalanche on Borneo's highest peak. Guides have helped 167 stranded climbers to safety, and eight more are still missing, according to news reports.

The 137 climbers, including an unknown number of foreign tourists, were unable to descent Mt. Kinabalu in Malaysian Borneo. However, Masidi Manjun, the tourism minister for Sabah state on the island's northeast side, tweeted:

Tariq Aziz, the man who became the public face of Iraqi strongman Saddam Hussein's regime, has died in custody 12 years after surrendering as Baghdad fell to invading U.S. troops, an Iraqi government official has confirmed. Aziz was 79.

The Associated Press reports the former foreign minister and deputy prime minister "died on Friday afternoon after he was taken to the al-Hussein hospital in the city of Nasiriyah, about 200 miles southeast of Baghdad, according to provincial governor Yahya al-Nassiri."

Not lost, just misplaced. That's the word from the Boston Library after it found two missing prints — a Dürer and Rembrandt worth a combined $630,000.

But their presumed loss had already set in motion a chain of events, including an FBI criminal probe and the resignation of the library's president.

In April we quoted Pakistani officials as saying that 10 men arrested in the near-fatal shooting of Pakistani youth activist Malala Yousafzai had been convicted in a secret trial and sent to prison for 25-year jail terms. Authorities now say that's not true — all but two of the men were "secretly acquitted" and set free.

The two men who weren't acquitted were actually handed life sentences, the officials say.

The U.S. economy got 280,000 new jobs in May, comfortably beating economists' expectations. Even so, the unemployment rate ticked up to 5.5 percent, according to the latest Labor Department report.

The Army has pushed back the date for a preliminary hearing for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the soldier released in a prisoner exchange with the Taliban last year after spending five years in captivity in Afghanistan.

The so-called Article 32 hearing for Bergdahl, who has been charged with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy, had been scheduled for July 8, but now will take place in September 17 at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas.

Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko warned the country's military to be ready for a "full-scale invasion" by Russian forces amid stepped up fighting near the border that has occurred despite a cease-fire agreement.

Poroshenko said 9,000 Russian troops were in Ukrainian territory already, a charge Moscow has denied. On Wednesday, west of the city of Donetsk, there was a 12-hour tank and artillery duel between Ukrainian forces and Russian-backed separatists — some of the fiercest fighting since a temporary truce went into effect in February.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

There's a new species of dinosaur, and they call him "Hellboy."

At first glance, the untrained eye is likely to see the childhood favorite Triceratops — and to be sure, Regaliceratops peterhewsi is a close relative. But there are some important differences, scientists say.

Updated at 1:00 p.m. ET

Rick Perry, the former governor of Texas and 2012 Republican candidate for president, formally announced a second bid for the White House.

At a rally in Addison, Texas, this afternoon, Perry told a group of supporters: "Today I am announcing that I'm running for the presidency of the United States of America."

He decried that "weakness at home has led to weakness abroad" and that "Our economy is barely growing."

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

A knife-wielding man who was fatally shot by terrorism investigators in Boston earlier this week had been plotting to "go after ... boys in blue," according to the FBI.

Usaama Rahim, 26, was killed Tuesday after he was confronted by members of an FBI antiterrorism task force and Boston police. Authorities say that Rahim lunged at them with a large, military-style knife as they approached him at his place of employment, a CVS drug store in the Roslindale neighborhood. They fatally shot him when he refused to drop his knife.

According to an analysis done by The Washington Post, police across the country have fatally shot at least 385 people so far this year –- a rate that comes to more than two a day and is twice the number counted by federal authorities.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders sought to put behind him a strange episode concerning a bizarre piece of fiction he authored four decades ago, likening the work to Fifty Shades of Grey during his appearance on NBC's Meet the Press.

Answering a question from the show's host, Chuck Todd, the Vermont lawmaker said, "This is a piece of fiction that I wrote in 1972, I think. That was 43 years ago. It was very poorly written.

For several years now, couples in Paris have been saying je t'aime by placing a padlock on the city's famed Pont des Arts bridge. And it has begun to weigh on the famous span — to the tune of some 45 tons.

Lovers (mostly tourists, Parisians say) have placed nearly a million padlocks on a fence along the bridge and then thrown the key into the Seine river as a symbol of their undying adoration. But city officials have a less romantic view of it all, blaming the padlocks for "long-term heritage degradation and a risk for visitors' security."

The Planetary Society says it has regained contact with its LightSail satellite. Last week fears arose that the organization had permanently lost touch with the tiny spacecraft, which launched earlier this month to lay the groundwork for testing a solar sail in Earth orbit.

It's a semi-annual alignment of sun and skyscrapers in downtown New York and it's happening tonight at 8:12 p.m. ET.

Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert was due to be arraigned in federal court next week on charges he paid hush money — reportedly to keep silent allegations of sexual abuse that date from his days as a high school teacher and coach in rural Illinois.

Updated at 11:25 a.m. ET

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley announced Saturday that he will seek the Democratic nomination for president, joining front-runner Hillary Clinton and dark horse candidate Bernie Sanders in the 2016 primary race.

Speaking at a rally in Baltimore, where O'Malley served as mayor before becoming governor, he decried "an economy that has so concentrated wealth in the hands of the very few that it has taken opportunity out of the homes of the many."

Officials are warning of more rain this weekend in Texas and Oklahoma, compounding severe flooding in the region that began last weekend and has been blamed for the deaths of at least 28 people.

Forecasters warn that the Colorado River at Wharton, Texas, could crest today, causing major flooding in that area. It is the wettest May on record for the state.

Meanwhile, volunteers searched the banks of the Blanco River in Central Texas, searching for people missing days after a vacation house was swept away, according to The Associated Press.

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET

A dual U.S.-Egyptian citizen who spent nearly two years in prison after being swept up in a crackdown on the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood movement has been released and will be deported to the United States.

Mohamed Soltan, 27, was sentenced for helping finance anti-government protests and for spreading "false news."

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