All Things Considered

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WEMU's All Things Considered local host is Bob Eccles who anchors all local news segments during the program.

NPR's All Things Considered paints the bigger picture with reports on the day's news, analysis of world events, and thoughtful commentary.

No Smoking Sign At Eastern Michigan University
Andrew Cluley / 89.1 WEMU

Eastern Michigan University students, staff, and visitors will have to leave campus to use tobacco starting next summer. 


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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez joins me here in the studio to talk about those new jobs numbers. Welcome back to the program.

U.S. LABOR SECREATRY THOMAS PEREZ: Melissa, it's always a pleasure to be with you.

Aaron Purmort was a mild-mannered art director by day, crime-fighting superhero by night. He was, in fact, Spider-Man. At least, that's what Purmort and his wife, Nora, would have you believe. Together, they wrote Purmort's obit before he died Nov. 25 after a long battle with cancer. Melissa Block talks to Nora McInerny Purmort to remember her late husband.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Homeless Advocates Launching Recall Effort

Dec 4, 2014
Vlastula / Foter / CC BY-NC-SA

People upset with the recent eviction of residents of a homeless camp at the end of Burton Road in Ann Arbor are launching a campaign to recall City Council member Stephen Kunselman.

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Religious protection bill teed up for House vote

A bill that's supposed to protect people exercising sincerely held religious beliefs has been approved by the state House on a party-line vote.
 

Fast-food workers rallied around the country Thursday, calling for a minimum wage of $15 an hour. But in suburban Detroit, a small but growing fast-casual burger and chicken chain has already figured out how to pay higher wages and still be profitable.

The American Red Cross's CEO, Gail McGovern, has spelled out the organization's promise to donors repeatedly in recent years.

"Ninety-one cents of every dollar that's donated goes to our services," McGovern said in a speech at Johns Hopkins University last year. "That's world class obviously."

California's Humboldt County is known for its towering redwoods. But this region about 200 miles north of San Francisco has another claim to fame. Humboldt is to weed what Napa is to fine wine — it's the heart of marijuana production in the U.S.

Every fall, young people, mostly in their 20s, come from all over the world to work the marijuana harvest. They come seeking jobs as "trimmers" — workers who manicure the buds to get them ready for market. The locals have a name for these young migrant workers: "trimmigrants."

The most closed country on earth — North Korea — is now denying its involvement in one of the biggest corporate hacks in history.

Someone attacked Sony Pictures Entertainment last week and made public troves of stolen data, including five unreleased films, medical records and salaries of nearly 7,000 global employees. But before a recent denial — another North Korean diplomat played coy about the country's involvement.

This post was updated at 11:10 a.m. ET for clarity.

How would you — or do you — identify on online dating sites? Gay? Straight? Bisexual? Well you're about to have many more options on OkCupid, one of the most popular sites for people seeking love and connection.

OkCupid has about 4 million users, and within the next few weeks the site will give all of them brand-new options for specifying their gender and sexual orientation — options like androgynous, asexual, genderqueer and questioning.

Noel Leader worked for the New York Police Department for more than 20 years, witnessing firsthand the racial tensions between the community and the police, and within the department itself. He left and founded "100 Blacks in Law Enforcement Who Care." He speaks with Audie Cornish about ways to improve community-police relations following an outpouring of anger at the shootings of two unarmed black men, Michael Brown and Eric Garner.

Growing Hope
facebook.com / Growing Hope

You soon may see more local food options at your favorite grocery store.  

A series of workshops promoting local food kick off next week with a session focused on helping cottage food businesses become commercially licensed. The license is needed to sell online and ship products.

Eastern Michigan University could be going completely tobacco free next summer.  

  The plan would ban the use of all tobacco products from university owned or operated facilities, including vehicles, starting in July 2015. 

The Achieving A Better Life Experience — ABLE — Act, which faced a House vote this week, hit close to home for Republican Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers of Washington state. "For me personally, this bill is about a little boy who was diagnosed with Down syndrome three days after he was born. His diagnosis came with a list of future complications," she said on the House floor.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

There are also some must-sees right now in Portland, Oregon - must-see Christmas sweaters. They're all over the city's downtown.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And not just on ironic holiday hipsters, but on a menagerie of animal statues.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This Year's Flu Season Could Be A Bad One

Dec 4, 2014
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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We may be in for a bad flu season this year. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning that today. And as NPR's Rob Stein reports, the reason is the main strain of flu virus that's circulating.

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AUDIE CORNISH: We head now to Staten Island. Jim O'Grady of our member station WNYC is near the spot where Eric Garner was arrested. And Jim, I understand that people have been gathering on the street since the announcement of the grand jury decision. Describe the scene.

body cameras
Throwawaysixtynine / Wikimedia Commons

Ypsilanti City Council has approved spending about $55,000 to buy 15 body-worn cameras for the police department.  The money will also pay for an upgrade to the department's in-car video system.


Michigan Public Radio Network

House holds hearing on LGBT civil rights bill

A state House committee adjourned Wednesday without voting on
legislation that would add LGBT protections to Michigan's civil rights
law, and it appears the effort has stalled as the Legislature grows
close to wrapping up for the year.

State Rep. Frank Foster (R-Petoskey) both testified and presided over
the hour-long hearing that allowed supporters and opponents to voice
their opinions. He said it's time for Michigan to update its civil
rights law.

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State House approves suspicion-based drug testing for welfare recipients

The state House has approved a bill that would revoke welfare payments from people who fail drug tests. The state would implement the one-year pilot program in three counties that have not yet been selected.

The drug testing will be conducted based on "reasonable suspicion," unlike previous programs in Michigan that made testing mandatory.

On The History Of Chokeholds In The NYPD

Dec 3, 2014
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Miami has a lot going for it. But as a young city, the one thing it doesn't have is a great, publicly owned art collection. (Though it recently built a $220 million art museum to house one.) What Miami does have is some great private collections of contemporary art that are open to the public. Those private collections helped attract Art Basel, a yearly event that turns Miami into a giant art fair. Every December, Art Basel draws top galleries, top buyers and tens of thousands of visitors.

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