Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00am-9:00am

89.1 WEMU presents Morning Edition from NPR.  David Fair, WEMU News Director,  keeps you up to date on all the latest news, traffic and weather in your neighborhood.  

NPR brings you news from around the country and the world.  Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne take you around the globe for the stories you'll be talking about all day.  While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host. 

WEMU features include Green Room, Issues of the Environment and Cinema Chat.  Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

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Middle East
7:16 am
Mon June 18, 2012

Main Syrian Opposition Group Tries To Unify Factions

The main opposition group in Syria is making a renewed push to unify various strands of the anti-regime movement. The new head of the Syrian National Council wants to broaden the group's appeal, and combat fears that it is dominated by the Muslim Brotherhood.

Around the Nation
7:05 am
Mon June 18, 2012

Will Obama's Immigration Policy Affect Alabama's Law?

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 8:24 am

Friday's announcement by the Obama administration that the U.S. plans to stop deporting some illegal immigrants received mixed reviews in Alabama. That state has one of the most aggressive anti-immigration laws in the country.

Around the Nation
6:45 am
Mon June 18, 2012

Re-Enactors Take On Elvis' Parents' Wedding

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 8:50 am

An Elvis impersonator may be a cliche, but Zac Hutchenson and Chastity Floyd found something original to do. They reenacted the wedding of Elvis Presley's parents over the weekend in Verona, Miss. Back in 1933, Vernon Presley was too young to marry without his parents' permission. So at age 17, he lied about his age, borrowed the cash for a license and wed Gladys Smith.

Around the Nation
6:42 am
Mon June 18, 2012

Taco Bell Hoax Upsets Small Alaska Town

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 7:56 am

The small Alaska town of Bethel has a population of 6,000, and the area can only be reached by boat or plane. Fliers posted throughout the town last week promised a Taco Bell. Sadly, it was what the Anchorage Daily News called "an evil hoax."

Latin America
3:09 am
Mon June 18, 2012

G-20 Leaders In Mexico Concentrate On Euro Crisis

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 10:39 am

President Obama and other world leaders are gathering in Los Cabos, Mexico, on Monday for the G-20 summit. They're hoping to get some assurances that European governments are getting control of their financial problems before they become a further drag on the global economy.

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Revolutionary Road Trip
3:07 am
Mon June 18, 2012

And Now For The Lighter Side Of Egypt's Revolution

One of the founders of Egypt's satirical online magazine El Koshary Today, Taha Belal, 28, at the Freedom Bar in downtown Cairo. Since Egypt's revolution last year, political parody has become popular on the Internet.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 9:48 am

NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is wrapping up his Revolutionary Road Trip, a journey of more than 2,700 miles across North Africa to see how the countries that staged revolutions last year are remaking themselves. Steve and his team have traveled from Tunisia's ancient city of Carthage, across the deserts of Libya, and filed this report from the third and final country, Egypt.

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Europe
3:05 am
Mon June 18, 2012

Locals Fear Venice Becoming 'A Big Shopping Center'

A gondola sails in front of the Fondaco dei Tedeschi, which has been sold to Benetton Group. The clothing company plans to convert the Venice landmark into a shopping mall.
Marco Secchi Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 3:45 pm

As Italy tries to fight its way out of a full-blown recession, the state and local governments are coming up with creative — and some say questionable — sources of revenue.

The latest example comes from Venice, where Benetton, the trendy Italian clothing-maker, is poised to put the city's first shopping mall right on the Grand Canal. Residents are up in arms, but officials say deals like these keep the lagoon city afloat.

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Money & Politics
3:04 am
Mon June 18, 2012

'Citizens United' Case Gets Renewed Scrutiny

Critics say U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, shown in 2010, backtracked on previous pledges to give high priority to precedent in the Citizens United campaign finance case.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 9:50 am

As early as Monday, the Supreme Court could decide to revisit its landmark Citizens United ruling of two and a half years ago.

That case gave corporations the green light to spend unlimited amounts in political campaigns. Now, a Montana case could lead the high court to take a second look at Citizens United.

Meanwhile, the role of Chief Justice John Roberts in the case is also raising questions in Congress.

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The Salt
3:03 am
Mon June 18, 2012

Is The Coconut Water Craze All It's Cracked Up To Be?

John Gordon Gauld, a 35-year old artist, bikes with coconut water in New York City.
Jacob Anderson

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 12:48 pm

You've probably seen them in the grocery store — cans of coconut water with their come-hither photos of young, green coconuts, tops sheared off, a straw poking out, and blue and green boxes that evoke cool, tropical breezes. Some vendors even sell the real thing. Artist John Gordon Gauld enjoys fresh coconut water when he's thirsty after biking through New York City.

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Around the Nation
10:55 am
Fri June 15, 2012

U.S. To Stop Deporting Some Young Illegal Immigrants

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 10:56 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Obama administration is announcing a major change in immigration policy this morning. It affects people who are brought to the U.S. as children illegally. Beginning immediately, these young people can avoid deportation and will be allowed to work in this country. The move could affect as many as 800,000 undocumented residents 30 years old or younger.

Joining us now to talk about the move is NPR's Scott Horsley. He's at the White House. And Scott, who exactly is affected?

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Middle East
8:36 am
Fri June 15, 2012

U.N. Sees 'Lack Of Willingness' For Peace In Syria

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 10:56 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

After a week of escalating violence in Syria, the chief U.N. official there in the country said today that efforts to resolve the conflict have had little effect. It was a bleak assessment from the man leading the United Nations observer mission for the past six months. NPR's Deborah Amos joins us from Damascus, where she has been out with observers assessing the situation.

And Deb, what was the message today from Major General Robert Mood?

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Strange News
7:37 am
Fri June 15, 2012

Haboob Haiku: Arizona Tweets About Storm Safety

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 10:56 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Summer dust storms in Arizona have a funny name - haboobs - but they can be deadly. This summer, Arizona transportation officials turned to poetry in their safety campaign, encouraging Twitter users to tweet haikus, like this one from Mindy Lee: Haboobs blow through town. In one instant it is dark. Pull over and wait. And here's Will Watson's: You're not a Jedi. This is not Tatooine, Luke. Pull over, man. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Strange News
7:28 am
Fri June 15, 2012

AP Issues Style Guidelines On 'Jeggings,' 'Jorts'

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 10:56 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All Songs Considered Blog
5:24 am
Fri June 15, 2012

Youssra El Hawary Scales A Wall With A Wink And A Smile

Egyptian singer/songwriter Youssra El Hawary.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 4:48 pm

I try my best to keep up on new sounds out of the Middle East and North Africa, but the name Youssra El Hawary was completely new to me until just a couple of weeks ago. But now, I'm totally hooked on music by this 28-year-old folkie-ish, indie-ish, chanson-ish singer/songwriter from Egypt armed not with a guitar, but ... an accordion.

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Asia
4:44 am
Fri June 15, 2012

China's Economy Cools, Perhaps More Than Planned

A Chinese worker operates a machine at a factory in Binzhou in northeast China's Shandong province. China's exports and imports shot up in May year-on-year, the customs agency said on June 10, defying expectations amid a slowdown in the world's second largest economy.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 11:14 am

In recent months, economic growth in China has not only slowed — it's slowed faster than most people expected. Last week, for the first time since the depths of the global financial crisis, the government actually cut lending rates to try to spur growth. All of this has people wondering: Where is the world's star economy headed?

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Planet Money
4:43 am
Fri June 15, 2012

Can Lincoln Be Cool Again?

An ad for the 1965 Lincoln Continental.
courtesy Lincoln

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 10:56 am

In the car business, Lincoln once stood as the pinnacle of luxury. Frank Sinatra drove a Lincoln. So did the Shah of Iran. In the U.S., the presidential limo was a Lincoln.

The brand peaked with the 1961 Lincoln Continental, a beautiful, innovative car that stood for style, individuality and sophistication.

But after the '60s, Lincoln started on a long, slow decline that mirrored the slide of the American auto industry.

Read more
Humans
4:07 am
Fri June 15, 2012

Famous Cave Paintings Might Not Be From Humans

The Panel of Hands in the Cave of El Castillo in Spain. New dating methods suggest the paintings could have been drawn by Neanderthals, not humans, as previously thought.
Pedro Saura AAAS/Science

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:33 am

The famous paintings on the walls of caves in Europe mark the beginning of figurative art and a great leap forward for human culture.

But now a novel method of determining the age of some of those cave paintings questions their provenance. Not that they're fakes — only that it might not have been modern humans who made them.

The first European cave paintings are thought to have been made over 30,000 years ago. Most depict animals and hunters. Some of the eeriest are stencils of human hands, apparently made by blowing a spray of pigment over a hand held up to a wall.

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Monkey See
4:03 am
Fri June 15, 2012

Neil deGrasse Tyson Investigates The Space Science Of Summer Movies

There's plenty of starfield action going on in Prometheus.
Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 10:56 am

If you make movies that have anything to do with science, please note: Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, director of the Hayden Planetarium, pays attention.

Read more
Law
3:57 am
Fri June 15, 2012

Legal Help For The Poor In 'State Of Crisis'

At Maryland's Legal Aid Bureau in Baltimore, the doors are open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. It serves as a kind of legal emergency room for people who need help but can't afford a lawyer.
Carrie Johnson NPR

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 10:56 am

Nearly 50 years ago, the Supreme Court ruled that people accused of a crime deserve the right to a defense lawyer, no matter whether they can afford to pay for one. But there's no such guarantee when it comes to civil disputes — like evictions and child custody cases — even though they have a huge impact on people's lives.

For decades, federal and state governments have pitched in to help. But money pressures mean the system for funding legal aid programs for the poor is headed toward a crisis.

A Legal ER

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Interviews
3:42 am
Fri June 15, 2012

A Single Dad And His Unlikely College Roommate

Wil Smith visited StoryCorps with his daughter, Olivia, in Sheffield, Mass.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 1:33 pm

In 1996, Wil Smith enrolled as a freshman at Maine's Bowdoin College. At 27, he had recently finished serving in the Navy. But he set off for school with his 1-year-old daughter, Olivia, in tow. Now that she's a teenager, Olivia sat down with her dad at StoryCorps to look back on their "college days" together.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
2:03 am
Fri June 15, 2012

Tracing The Trail Of Musical Fathers

Fathers have played an important role in shaping musical history.
Matthew Scherf iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 10:56 am

With Father's Day coming up this weekend, Morning Edition music commentator Miles Hoffman has been thinking about a few musical dads and their children.

Read more
Strange News
7:01 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Study: Shoes Tell A Lot About A Person

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 7:07 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. They say to understand a man, walk a mile in his shoes. Research from the University of Kansas suggests you don't even need to do that. The new study found judgments based on simply looking at someone's shoes, were right 90 percent of the time.

Shoes can reveal age, income, emotional state and political preference. Liberals really do wear shabby shoes and extroverts, flashy ones. Oddly, those in uncomfortable shoes tended to be calm.

Strange News
6:57 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Gym Manager Booby-Traps Locker To Catch Thief

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 7:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Law
5:06 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Michigan Finally Eyeing Changes To Lawyers For Poor

Edward Carter's conviction for a 1974 crime was vacated by a judge after it was shown that Carter was innocent — and after he had spent 35 years in Michigan prisons.
Brakkton Booker NPR

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 12:05 pm

Lawyers on all sides agree the system enshrined nearly 50 years ago that gives all defendants the right to a lawyer is not working. The Justice Department calls it a crisis — such a big problem that it's been doling out grants to improve how its adversaries perform in criminal cases.

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Middle East
5:05 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Iran's Nuclear Fatwa: A Policy Or A Ploy?

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad delivers a speech under a portrait of Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, on June 2. The supreme leader has said repeatedly that nuclear weapons are un-Islamic and Iran will not pursue them. But in the West, many are skeptical.
Atta Kenare AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 8:25 pm

It's been an article of faith for nearly a decade that Iran's supreme leader issued a fatwa — a religious edict — that nuclear weapons are a sin and Iran has no intention of acquiring them.

President Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton recently made references to this religious commitment from Iran's leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

Read more

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