Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00am-9:00am

89.1 WEMU presents Morning Edition from NPR.  David Fair, WEMU News Director,  keeps you up to date on all the latest news, traffic and weather in your neighborhood.  

NPR brings you news from around the country and the world.  Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne take you around the globe for the stories you'll be talking about all day.  While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host. 

WEMU features include Green Room, Issues of the Environment and Cinema Chat.  Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

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Monkey See
4:00 pm
Thu March 22, 2012

Spiders And Fighting And Trees, Oh My: Filming 'The Hunger Games'

Jennifer Lawrence on the set of The Hunger Games.
Murray Close Lionsgate

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 12:24 pm

There's a movie freshly out this weekend — perhaps you've heard of it.

The Hunger Games?

On Friday's Morning Edition, director Gary Ross and star Jennifer Lawrence talk to NPR's David Greene about the film.

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Planet Money
4:56 am
Thu March 22, 2012

From Abe Lincoln To Donald Duck: History Of The Income Tax

U.S. Treasury Department/Walt Disney

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 9:02 am

The story of how the U.S. wound up with the income tax is the story of two wars, a Supreme Court justice on his death bed, and Donald Duck.

It's also the story of how the government overcame three obstacles.

Obstacle No. 1: Logistics

How do you make sure people pay?

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Author Interviews
3:52 am
Thu March 22, 2012

'Wonder' What It's Like To Have Kids Stare At You?

Random House

Raquel Jaramillo's debut novel, Wonder, written under the pen name R.J. Palacio, was born out of a rather embarrassing incident. The author was out with her two sons, sitting in front of an ice cream store. Her oldest had just finished fifth grade, and her youngest was still in a stroller. They spotted a girl whose face had been deformed by a medical condition.

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Europe
9:52 am
Wed March 21, 2012

French Police Surround Suspect In School Shooting

Originally published on Sun March 25, 2012 9:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

In the southern French city of Toulouse, police are in a stand-off with a man suspected of carrying out a series of shootings. The suspect is described as a 24-year-old French citizen, of North African heritage. He is said to be an al-Qaida sympathizer.

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Food
4:07 am
Wed March 21, 2012

Italian 'Nonnas' Bring Taste Of Home To Staten Island

Several of the "nonnas," or grandmothers, who cook at the Enoteca Maria Italian restaurant in Staten Island, N.Y.
Glen DiCrocco

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 10:23 am

America is dotted with countless restaurants large and small. Many of those are well-loved for their distinct character — and for what they can teach diners about cooking, and about life.

One such establishment is Enoteca Maria, an Italian restaurant on New York's Staten Island.

After losing his mom and sister, owner Joe Scaravella missed sitting down with family for home-cooked meals. So he created something of an oxymoron: a place to go out for a home-cooked meal.

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Monkey See
8:24 am
Tue March 20, 2012

Cheaper Clothes And Shorter Stories: On Soaps, Strange 'Days' Indeed

Peter Reckell as Bo Brady and Kristian Alfonso as Hope Williams Brady: still at it after all these years.
Mitchell Haaseth NBC Universal

It's not easy being one of the last soaps standing, as Neda Ulaby reports on today's Morning Edition. For fans, the shuttering of iconic shows like All My Children and Guiding Light has upended routines that, for some, date back to childhood. When I was in high school, my soap of choice was Days Of Our Lives, which Neda says has changed a lot since that era — well, it's changed and it hasn't.

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NPR Story
4:00 am
Tue March 20, 2012

Last Word In Business

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is a total eclipse of the money.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MONEY")

DAVID GILMOUR: (Singing) Money, get away...

GREENE: Pink Floyd's "Dark Side of the Moon" album that produced the classic rock staple called "Money" has just been bumped from the British charts by pop singer Adele's sophomore effort, "Twenty-One," "Twenty-One" is now the seventh best-selling album in U.K. history, And it's within striking distance of several more classics, including Michael Jackson's "Thriller."

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NPR Story
4:00 am
Tue March 20, 2012

Fla. Teen's Shooter Faces FBI Scrutiny

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We're following up now on the fatal shooting of a black teenager by an Hispanic neighborhood watch leader. That shooting took place three weeks ago in the central Florida town of Sanford. So far, no charges have been filed against George Zimmerman, who says he was acting in self-defense when he shot 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. The African-American community is frustrated. And yesterday student protestors were out in Sanford demanding the shooter be arrested. Mark Simpson of member station WMFE in Orlando has this report.

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NPR Story
4:00 am
Tue March 20, 2012

U.K. Considering Long-Term Bonds

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 8:31 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, one way governments raise money is by issuing bonds: you or your pension fund lend them the money, and they then pay a set amount of interest for a set amount of time, say 10 or 20 years. Well, Britain's finance minister, George Osborne, is reportedly ready to announce that the UK plans to issue a bond that only your great-grandchildren will be able to cash in. It matures in a hundred years.

Vicki Barker has this report from London.

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Business
4:00 am
Tue March 20, 2012

Settlement Is Latest Blow For Cash-Strapped Mets

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It was two outs, bottom of the ninth for the New York Mets. Facing a civil trial in federal court this week, they managed to pull off a clutch out of court settlement with a price tag of $162 million, the value of a long-term contract for a star player. The team's owners reached that deal with the trustee recovering money for victims of imprisoned financier Bernie Madoff.

But as WNYC's Janet Babin reports, any relief is tempered by the team's long-term financial struggles.

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Author Interviews
3:49 am
Tue March 20, 2012

That's All, Folks: Kevin Smith On Leaving Filmmaking

Courtesy Penguin

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 10:40 am

When 21-year-old Kevin Smith decided he wanted to be a filmmaker, his sister gave him some advice: "Don't say you want to be a filmmaker; just be one." So he did. He made his first film, Clerks, on a shoestring, shooting at the convenience store where he worked.

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Election 2012
3:41 am
Tue March 20, 2012

For A Personal Cause, Casino Owner Bets On Gingrich

Sheldon Adelson speaks at the 2008 "Facing Tomorrow" Presidential Conference in Jerusalem.
David Silverman Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 25, 2012 9:05 am

One of the defining elements of the 2012 presidential campaign is money. Not that the candidates themselves have raised all that much; except for President Obama, they haven't. But two dozen wealthy Americans have put in at least $1 million each.

Mostly, they're a mix of Wall Street financiers and entrepreneurs. One of the biggest donors is Sheldon Adelson, a casino magnate who is worth about $25 billion.

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NPR Story
9:05 am
Mon March 19, 2012

Apple To Buy Back Stock, Pay Dividend

Originally published on Mon March 19, 2012 9:06 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Apple's giant pile of money.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The maker of iPads, iPhones and computers is sitting on almost one hundred billion dollars in cash and securities. And today, Apple announced that it will spend some of that money paying a stock dividend to shareholders and buying back some company stock. NPR's Steve Henn has been following developments, and joins us on the line from Silicon Valley. Steve, good morning.

STEVE HENN, BYLINE: Good morning.

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Music
5:14 am
Mon March 19, 2012

Tanlines: Grown-Up Problems, With A Beat

Jesse Cohen and Eric Emm of Tanlines.
Courtesy of the artist

Four years since they first began making music together, the Brooklyn-based duo Tanlines is finally releasing an album: Mixed Emotions, out tomorrow. The band is Eric Emm, who sings and plays guitar, and Jesse Cohen, who plays drums, keyboards and an assortment of electronic instruments. Cohen is also the chattier of the two.

"We use a lot of different drum kits that are in a computer," Cohen explains. "We also play a lot of stuff live, and a lot of time you can't really tell which is real and which is fake. That's sort of a thing that we like to play with."

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Author Interviews
4:59 am
Mon March 19, 2012

'Damn Good Advice' From One Of The Real 'Mad Men'

George Lois, pictured above in the early 1960s, was a pioneer during the "Creative Revolution" of American advertising.
Courtesy Phaidon Press

Originally published on Mon March 19, 2012 10:20 am

Don Draper, the main character on the hit TV show Mad Men, is said to have been inspired by a real Madison Avenue ad man: George Lois. Lois was a leader in the "Creative Revolution" in advertising during the 1950s, and became one of the most influential art directors in advertising history. His work helped make brands like Xerox, Lean Cuisine and Jiffy Lube famous. Lois is perhaps best known for creating iconic Esquire magazine covers, many of which now reside in the Museum of Modern Art.

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Around the Nation
8:38 am
Fri March 16, 2012

UC Irvine Students Call For Chehabi's Resignation

The student government at the University of California, Irvine voted Thursday night to call for the resignation of Dr. Hazem Chehabi, who is the chairman of its school's foundation. He also serves as the Syrian consul general in California. He is a personal friend of Syria's dictator Bashar Assad.

The Salt
8:12 am
Fri March 16, 2012

Chances Are Pink Slime Is In Grocery Store Beef Too

If you're trying to determine whether the ground chuck you buy in the grocery store contains so-called pink slime, or lean beef trimmings, you won't find it on the ingredient list. "It's not required to be labeled," explains Don Schaffner, a food scientist at Rutgers University.

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Television
7:14 am
Fri March 16, 2012

Hotel Alcatraz Isn't Exactly Like The Prison

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Europe
7:04 am
Fri March 16, 2012

Pope Benedict Has His Own Custom Cologne

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Movies
6:53 am
Fri March 16, 2012

Cameras Follow World's Greatest Sushi Chef

Jiro Ono, 85, owns a small sushi restaurant in a Tokyo subway station. The 10 seats at the sushi bar require reservations months in advance. In the new movie, Jiro Dreams of Sushi, director David Gelb explores the chef's relationships with his sons and the art of sushi-making. Gelb talks to Renee Montagne about Ono's story.

Food
6:46 am
Fri March 16, 2012

Pink Slime Could Be In Grocery Store Beef Too

The Department of Agriculture has announced it would give schools the choice to order ground beef that does not contain Pink Slime — otherwise known as lean beef trimmings. But beef trimmings aren't just found in school lunches.

Sports
6:30 am
Fri March 16, 2012

Iowa State Defeats UConn; VCU Beats Wichita St.

Originally published on Fri March 16, 2012 1:08 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

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Afghanistan
5:58 am
Fri March 16, 2012

Peace Deal Process With Taliban Stalls

Originally published on Fri March 16, 2012 9:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

We're learning more about the American staff sergeant accused of killing 16 villagers in Afghanistan. Last night, his lawyer said the soldier did not want to go to Afghanistan, his fourth deployment for the Army. He had been wounded twice and he didn't think he was healthy enough to deploy. The attorney didn't release the soldier's name, but did say he was the father of two young children and added that the soldier's family was totally shocked by the allegations against him.

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Latin America
4:47 am
Fri March 16, 2012

'Dirty War' Children Returned To Argentine Relatives

Originally published on Fri March 16, 2012 9:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne with Steve Inskeep.

The heirs to one Latin America's biggest media conglomerates, a brother and a sister, spent years with their real identities in question. They've long been thought to be part of a group of children stolen from their birth parents more than 30 years ago. That was during Argentina's Dirty War, the terror campaign waged by the military junta then ruling Argentina against members of the opposition.

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NPR Story
4:00 am
Fri March 16, 2012

'Footnote' Takes On Ambition, Father-Son Rivalry

Originally published on Sun March 18, 2012 11:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Israeli film "Footnote" has racked up a pile of awards - Best Screenplay at Cannes, nine awards at Israel's Oscars, and a nomination for Best Foreign Language film at the Academy Awards.

Film critic Kenneth Turan says it's all deserved.

KENNETH TURAN: "Footnotes"'s subject matter sounds dry, unlikely, even obscure. The film is set in Jerusalem's Hebrew University and deals with the implacable rivalry between two scholars of the Talmud, the complex and sacred text of the Jewish religious tradition.

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