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89.1 WEMU presents Morning Edition from NPR.  David Fair, WEMU News Director,  keeps you up to date on all the latest news, traffic and weather in your neighborhood.  

NPR brings you news from around the country and the world.  Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne take you around the globe for the stories you'll be talking about all day.  While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host. 

WEMU features include Green Room, Issues of the Environment and Cinema Chat.  Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:01 am
Tue March 27, 2012

In Haiti, Bureaucratic Delays Stall Mass Cholera Vaccinations

Joseph Francis, 54, says he came to this cholera clinic in Haiti's capital, Port-au-Prince,after becoming so dehydrated he could barely walk. Cholera has killed more than 7,000 Haitians since the first outbreak of the disease in October 2010. At the start of the rainy season, cases are once again beginning to climb.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:56 am

A hundred thousand people in Haiti are ready and waiting to get vaccinated against cholera.

The vaccine is sitting in coolers. Vaccination teams are all trained. Willing recipients are registered and entered into databases.

The impending mass vaccination project aims to show that vaccinating against cholera is feasible in Haiti. It has never been done in the midst of an ongoing cholera epidemic. So far, more than 530,000 Haitians have fallen ill with cholera, and more than 7,000 have died.

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Movies
12:01 am
Tue March 27, 2012

'October Baby' Tells A Story Hollywood Wouldn't

First-year college student Hannah (Rachel Hendrix) goes on a road trip in search of her birth mother after she learns she was adopted following a failed attempt at an abortion.
Lovell/Fairchild Communications

October Baby tells the story of 19-year-old Hannah, a first-year college student, who leaves home on a search for her birth mother. In many ways, it's a Hollywood-style road trip movie dealing with questions of identity, but at the movie's core is also a vigorous message about abortion.

In one scene, Hannah tracks down a nurse who worked at the health clinic where her birth mother had sought an abortion — one that failed when Hannah was born prematurely.

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Europe
7:44 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Fake Movie Anthem Played For Kazakhstan Winner

Kazakhstan's Maria Dmitrienko took gold at the Arab Shooting Championships last week in Kuwait. As she stood to hear her national anthem, out blared the parody anthem from the movie Borat. Organizers apologized. They got Serbia's anthem wrong, too.

Europe
7:35 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Should Big Ben Be Renamed Big Beth?

Britain's Big Ben is technically the giant bell inside St. Stephen's Tower at Parliament. Some members of Parliament want it renamed the Elizabeth tower, in honor of the queen. Jokingly, some suggested the name: Big Beth.

NPR Story
4:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Hospitals Guard Against Smartphones Distracting Doctors

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 6:33 am

Apple's iPads and rival devices are finding a happy home in hospitals and medical practices. But as with driving, distractions are threatening safety — in this case, patient safety.

NPR Story
4:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Business News

Royal Dutch Shell can't pay the $1 billion it owes Iran because of sanctions imposed on the Middle East country by the United States and European Union. The sanctions have made it nearly impossible to transfer the money. Reuters reports that Shell is trying to wrap up its business dealings with Iran.

NPR Story
4:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Businessman Chosen As Hong Kong's Next Leader

A selection committee in Hong Kong has chosen a former Cabinet chief as the southern Chinese financial hubs next leader. The voters were handpicked by Beijing. Leung Chun-ying's term will start in July.

NPR Story
4:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

NCAA Men's Final Four Set To Play Saturday

Only four teams remain in the NCAA men's basketball tournament: Kentucky, Louisville, Ohio State and Kansas. Kentucky already has seven national titles. Kansas has three championships, Louisville has two and Ohio State won its lone title in 1960.

Business
4:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Michigan Furniture Maker Celebrates 100 Years

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 6:45 am

Transcript

DAVID GREEENE, HOST:

Steelcase, the world's largest office furniture maker, is celebrating 100 years in business. But sales of the metal filing cabinets Steelcase is named for are declining - same with cubicles and other large pieces of office furniture.

LINDSEY SMITH, BYLINE: So, as Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith reports, Steelcase says it's changing its identity.

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Asia
4:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Global Nuclear Summit Opens In South Korea

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 5:15 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning to you. I'm David Greene.

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Business
4:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 7:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREEENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is an appetite for "The Hunger Games." Apparently a lot of people spent part of their weekend at the movie theater watching Katniss Everdeen run through the woods. The adventure film collected $155 million at box offices this weekend. That's the most ever for a film that is not a sequel.

Speaking of sequels, "Hunger Games" producers must be liking their odds in the future. They already have a sequel in the works. It is scheduled to start filming this fall.

Law
4:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Employers Monitor Health Care Law Arguments

The Supreme Court won't rule on President Obama's health care case until June. Republicans vow to repeal the law if they win big in November. David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, talks to David Greene about how the ruling could affect doctors, hospitals, employers and consumers.

Judging The Health Care Law
12:01 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Supreme Court Word Search: Health Care

When the U.S. Supreme Court hears challenges to the Obama administration's health care law this week, the arguments will be complex, with questions about states' rights, mandatory insurance, and Medicaid.

To introduce those concepts — and to give the rest of us something to do while the court hears six hours of arguments — we offer a word search game. The grid below features many words you'll likely hear this week, as NPR's Nina Totenberg reports from the court.

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Music Interviews
4:00 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Susan Justice: Sometimes You Just Have To 'Eat Dirt'

To get away from a strict religious family, Susan Justice fled to New York in 2001 to busk on the streets.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 10:21 am

In a busy New York subway station, a man serenades passersby with a beat-up guitar. A few of them look up from their BlackBerrys and toss a little change in his guitar case. It's a scene that plays out in subways and streets around the world.

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U.S.
12:19 pm
Fri March 23, 2012

Obama Announces Pick For World Bank Post

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The White House has made its choice for who should lead the World Bank. Jim Yong Kim is currently the president of Dartmouth University. He's a physician and a global health expert and something of a surprise to people who've been watching this process.

Here is President Obama at the White House this morning.

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Crisis In The Housing Market
5:03 am
Fri March 23, 2012

Fannie, Freddie Press For Mortgage Write-Downs

A Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac mortgage services representative (left) helps a person register for mortgage help in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

The two most powerful entities in the housing market — Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac — could be on the verge of a significant change regarding foreclosures. NPR and ProPublica have learned that both firms have concluded that giving homeowners a big break on their mortgages would make good financial sense in many cases.

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Planet Money
4:58 am
Fri March 23, 2012

How A City Goes Broke

A garbage truck at the Harrisburg incinerator.
MLADEN ANTONOV AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 5:35 pm

This is the first of two stories we're doing on Harrisburg. Read the second story here.

Eric Papenfuse owns a bookstore in Harrisburg, Pa. He used to be on the city agency in charge of basic municipal services — sewer, water, trash.

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Monkey See
12:01 am
Fri March 23, 2012

'Mad Men' Returns On Sunday, To The Delight Of Its Excitable Fans

Jon Hamm plays Don Draper on Mad Men, which returns this Sunday night.
Frank Ockenfels AMC

On Friday's Morning Edition, Elizabeth Blair investigates one of television's pressing questions: Why has Mad Men been off the air so long? It's returning this Sunday night with a two-hour season premiere, but it's still puzzled some viewers that it has been off for such a long time.

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Monkey See
4:00 pm
Thu March 22, 2012

Spiders And Fighting And Trees, Oh My: Filming 'The Hunger Games'

Jennifer Lawrence on the set of The Hunger Games.
Murray Close Lionsgate

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 12:24 pm

There's a movie freshly out this weekend — perhaps you've heard of it.

The Hunger Games?

On Friday's Morning Edition, director Gary Ross and star Jennifer Lawrence talk to NPR's David Greene about the film.

Read more
Planet Money
4:56 am
Thu March 22, 2012

From Abe Lincoln To Donald Duck: History Of The Income Tax

U.S. Treasury Department/Walt Disney

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 9:02 am

The story of how the U.S. wound up with the income tax is the story of two wars, a Supreme Court justice on his death bed, and Donald Duck.

It's also the story of how the government overcame three obstacles.

Obstacle No. 1: Logistics

How do you make sure people pay?

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Author Interviews
3:52 am
Thu March 22, 2012

'Wonder' What It's Like To Have Kids Stare At You?

Random House

Raquel Jaramillo's debut novel, Wonder, written under the pen name R.J. Palacio, was born out of a rather embarrassing incident. The author was out with her two sons, sitting in front of an ice cream store. Her oldest had just finished fifth grade, and her youngest was still in a stroller. They spotted a girl whose face had been deformed by a medical condition.

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Europe
9:52 am
Wed March 21, 2012

French Police Surround Suspect In School Shooting

Originally published on Sun March 25, 2012 9:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

In the southern French city of Toulouse, police are in a stand-off with a man suspected of carrying out a series of shootings. The suspect is described as a 24-year-old French citizen, of North African heritage. He is said to be an al-Qaida sympathizer.

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Food
4:07 am
Wed March 21, 2012

Italian 'Nonnas' Bring Taste Of Home To Staten Island

Several of the "nonnas," or grandmothers, who cook at the Enoteca Maria Italian restaurant in Staten Island, N.Y.
Glen DiCrocco

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 10:23 am

America is dotted with countless restaurants large and small. Many of those are well-loved for their distinct character — and for what they can teach diners about cooking, and about life.

One such establishment is Enoteca Maria, an Italian restaurant on New York's Staten Island.

After losing his mom and sister, owner Joe Scaravella missed sitting down with family for home-cooked meals. So he created something of an oxymoron: a place to go out for a home-cooked meal.

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Monkey See
8:24 am
Tue March 20, 2012

Cheaper Clothes And Shorter Stories: On Soaps, Strange 'Days' Indeed

Peter Reckell as Bo Brady and Kristian Alfonso as Hope Williams Brady: still at it after all these years.
Mitchell Haaseth NBC Universal

It's not easy being one of the last soaps standing, as Neda Ulaby reports on today's Morning Edition. For fans, the shuttering of iconic shows like All My Children and Guiding Light has upended routines that, for some, date back to childhood. When I was in high school, my soap of choice was Days Of Our Lives, which Neda says has changed a lot since that era — well, it's changed and it hasn't.

Read more
NPR Story
4:00 am
Tue March 20, 2012

Last Word In Business

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is a total eclipse of the money.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MONEY")

DAVID GILMOUR: (Singing) Money, get away...

GREENE: Pink Floyd's "Dark Side of the Moon" album that produced the classic rock staple called "Money" has just been bumped from the British charts by pop singer Adele's sophomore effort, "Twenty-One," "Twenty-One" is now the seventh best-selling album in U.K. history, And it's within striking distance of several more classics, including Michael Jackson's "Thriller."

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