Ann Arbor Crosswalk Law

City of Ann Arbor

Motorists in Ann Arbor still need to stop for pedestrians waiting at the curb at a crosswalk.  Mayor John Hieftje yesterday formally vetoed an ordinance amendment passed by council last week to only require drivers to stop for pedestrians already in the crosswalk. 

Hieftje says Ann Arbor's current law is safer for pedestrians than the state traffic code and laws in other Michigan cities.  Hieftje says he looks forward to other measures to increase pedestrian safety.  These will include increased education, and enforcement of the crosswalk law. 

Council would need eight votes to override the veto, but only six members voted in favor of the ordinance amendment.


morguefile.com

Ann Arbor's crosswalk law won't be changing despite city council approving an ordinance amendment. 

That's because last night immediately after the 6 to 4 vote, Mayor John Hieftje announced he will veto the change.  Ann Arbor's law requires motorists to stop for pedestrians on the curb at a crosswalk as opposed to the state traffic code which requires vehicles to yield to pedestrians in a crosswalk. Opponents of Ann Arbor's law would prefer to use the Michigan Traffic Code instead.

The difference is whether motorists have to stop for pedestrians still on the sidewalk but at a crosswalk as current law requires, or only having to yield for pedestrians in the crosswalk.

City Council member Stephen Kunselman says the veto means the poorly crafted and implemented law remains in place.

However, nearly 40 people spoke in favor of keeping the law during a public hearing.  Community members said more motorists are starting to stop for pedestrians and with better enforcement and education pedestrian safety could be further improved. 

Mayor Hiefjte believes the data doesn't show changing the law will help pedestrians.