Michigan Roads

Ann Arbor Area Transportation Authority
Andrew Cluley / 89.1 WEMU

As lawmakers in Lansing debate how to fix the state's roads, a casualty could be plans to expand public transit options in Washtenaw County. 

The Ann Arbor Area Transportation Authority plans to increase service by 44 percent over the next five years, thanks largely to the transit millage approved by voters this year. Those plans could be in jeopardy if the road funding plan approved by the house goes forward. It would cost the AAATA nearly $2 million annually.

Semis
Jake Neher / Michigan Public Radio Network

A group of semi-truck drivers made some noise Tuesday outside the state Capitol.

Several 18-wheelers circled the building with horns blaring to protest legislation that would increase fines and fees for overweight vehicles. It’s likely to be part of a compromise plan to increase funding to fix Michigan’s roads.

wikimedia commons

State Senate rejects bill to reduce truck weight limits

The state Senate has rejected a bill that would reduce the amount of weight trucks are allowed to carry on Michigan's roads. The state has the highest truck weight limits in the country.

Democrats say reducing the limits will help keep the roads from crumbling.

Ann Arbor Ypsilanti Regional Chamber
facebook.com

State lawmakers are down to their last nine days of work before the lame duck session ends December 18th.  The Ann Arbor Ypsilanti Regional Chamber is calling for a plan to fix the roads, and an update to the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act.


Andrew Cluley / 89.1 WEMU

An act passed by the Michigan Legislature in 1909 to keep roads safe for Model T's could lead to a smoother ride for motorists in Washtenaw County next year.  It's back to the future for the latest effort to improve the quality of local roads.


Andrew Cluley

Talks over ways to fix Michigan's roads "back at square one"
 

State lawmakers are hitting the reset button on talks over how to fix Michigan's crumbling roads.

A state Senate workgroup met for the first time Thursday to hammer out a solution. Senators and staff involved in the meeting say it consisted of members offering wide ranging ideas for how to address the issue.

Most estimates say the state needs to boost road funding by between $1 billion and $2 billion a year just to keep the roads from getting worse.

Andrew Cluley

The idea of raising the tax on gasoline to help pay for road repairs in Michigan is drawing mixed reviews locally.

WEMU news caught up with Billy Starr walking along Huron Street in downtown Ypsilanti.  He says gas is taxed plenty already.

"I think it's way too high," Starr says. He worries people won't be able to afford to drive.

Others say they'd be willing to pay a little more for gas if it'll help repair Michigan's crumbling roads.